The Ancheer Folding Electric Bike is a great product at a great price. It’s pretty good looking, despite the slightly cumbersome battery pack attached to the frame. It has a wide range of features, is very easy to use and comes mostly assembled. The ability to fold it down for easy transport and storage just adds to the versatility and practicality that the bike already has. Ancheer are also said to have a great customer service team if there are any problems. Best of all you get all of this for way less than a $1000. Most quality e-bikes now a days will easily set you back $1000, sometimes several times more.
To start off with I love using the bike for work every day, I always used a racing bike for work previous over the last 7 yrs or so, I have had my bike for 4 months now, clocked up 600 miles, in that time it has lost power about 2 times, not a real problem as you reopen the meter, you can be on your way again. I changed the tyres and seat like others did !! I would definitely recommend to friends & Family it's built like a tank very good Quality !!
Ancheer specialise in a range of electrical and non electrical products, from simple trampolines to some high tech electric mountain bikes. All their products follow a theme of being reasonably well made and being on the lower end of the price range. Today we’ll look at and review the Ancheer Folding Electric Mountain bike. We’ve gathered all the information you need to help you decide whether it’s the right e-bike for you.

my thoughts on Hucksauce's question (electric bike or electric motorcycle? How is it defined?). I own a Honda ruckus, its 50cc its max speed cant exceed 45mph and i don't need a motorcycle license. therefore no motorcycle. If the motor on a E-bike can carry you past 45mph i would consider it a motorcycle. made street legal a E-bike that Exceeds 45mph possible would need a motorcycle license.
In our view, e-bikes are approaching a crossroads in concept and design. Heading off in one direction are longer travel, enduro-style e-bikes, which are largely designed for cruising up and then blasting back down. Plotting a slightly different course is the idea of a lightweight model that rides much more like a normal mountain bike, but requires more work from the rider. Of the two approaches, both have their benefits, but it’s the latter that gets us the most excited. Once the overall weight falls into the 16-17kg range (the lightest bikes are currently19-20kg) it’s going to be really hard to tell the difference between an e-bike and a regular trail bike on the descents and the flat, but you get the benefit of a gentle push up the climbs.
Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.

My wife has a Scott, essentially a Contessa with a Bosch crank motor. Very heavy thing, bloody hard work with no assistance, but even with assist on progress surely depends on your effort. We don’t do a lot of trail centres, but it’s been fine round Rothie, up to Einich, in Inshriach and up the Corbett behind Kingussie, as well as onroad. Lets us ride together, which would be harder without assist, and is heling her recover from skiing injuries.


I should have bought one a few years ago but i dithered as i placed my faith in the Spinal team to repair me, or at least offer a solution that i could work with to enable me to continue riding off-road but i finally had to face the fact that i will never be able to ride like i used to on my Soulcraft SS, no more lapping Kirroughtree or climbing Heatrbreak Hill over n’ over just because i could which if i’m honest with myself was partly why i refused to entertain the idea of an electric assist bike – i kinda took the huff n’ sat in the corner with a petted lip due to my lack of leg muscle strength – I refused to admit i needed any help.
The frame is solid. In fact too solid for me. The frame is thick with such a girth that my rear wheel bike rack doesn't fit (around the frame or into the pre-drilled holes because the disk brake is in the way). Shocks seem to work fine. I do enjoy having the kick stand further back, provides a lot more stabilization to the bike vice being closer to the pedals.
The Ancheer is powered by a 36V 8Ah battery system that is mounted on the front of the handlebars. This powers a 250 W brushless motor. How much power you want the bike to exert is dependant on which mode you set it to. It has 2 modes: assistive and e-bike. E-bike will power the entire thing for you so you don’t have to pedal at all, whereas assistive will give you a bit of power to help you out. This is all controlled by a small panel on the handlebars. The assistive mode has 3 settings so you can have as much control over the amount of work you do as you desire.
Having a motor bolted to the bottom of a mountain bike that provides pedal assistance is an amazing leveller. The constant torque it applies to the chain rounds out the squarest of pedalling actions, which in turn helps stabilizes the rear suspension and counter pedal induced bob, seamlessly shifting your focus from pedalling efficiency to battery life.
With three levels of assistance, the the ANCHEER Power Plus lets you enjoy a fun and easy ride every time . If you want to reach your destination without breaking a sweat, the Pure Electric Mode or full throttle mode will give you the full power you want. But, if you want a light cardio workout but with a little assistance, use the Pedal Assist Mode. Want the feel of a traditional bike? Use the Regular Bike mode. 

Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.
Why We Like It: SwagTron is a company known for producing quality electric personal transportation device. I can confidently say that the SwagCycle EB-5 Pro lives up to their quality standards. This is a great little bike for tooling back and forth around your campus or any other situation where you have to go to and fro a lot. With a comfortable speed of 15 MPH and a weight limit of 265 pounds, this is a reliable bike for beginners of almost any size. It has a range of 15.5 miles. Not the furthest, but a great range for new riders.
We think that the Ancheer Folding Electric Mountain Bike looks (mostly) great. The frame is finished very well and the wheel are striking. The only complaint we have with the looks and the overall design is how they decided to implement the battery pack. The little pouch at the front looks out of place and can feel a bit cumbersome. We would have liked if they could have potentially attached it, or better yet integrated it into the horizontal part of the main frame. I understand the difficulties of doing this as the bike has the folding mechanism but it would have been nice if they’d have managed it.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs.
×