Amazing bike, quick. On the flat average 21mph full power, after 3-4 miles average 18mph. A lot of hills in SoCal so this 1/3 hp motor does it’s job well with pedal assist on very steep grades. With electric only mode and heavy, steep, long hills this bike does its job pushing through a 16 mile commute with some energy to spare with a 190lb load of me and my gear. This bike could do much more with flat and pedal assist modes maybe twice as far. Recommend you use smaller tires 1.75 vs the standard 1.95 to achieve my results. Continental contact travels work great!
Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).
It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
I was up at Aviemore last September and borrowed the Scott E-Spark from Bothy Bikes and within an hr i returned to the shop with a stupid goofy grin on my face and ordered the Scott E-Genuis 710+, i had to wait 4 months till they were released but David got me one of the first to arrive and i drove up to collect it the following week, i’ve not regretted buying it for one second 😀 .

We think that the Ancheer Folding Electric Mountain Bike looks (mostly) great. The frame is finished very well and the wheel are striking. The only complaint we have with the looks and the overall design is how they decided to implement the battery pack. The little pouch at the front looks out of place and can feel a bit cumbersome. We would have liked if they could have potentially attached it, or better yet integrated it into the horizontal part of the main frame. I understand the difficulties of doing this as the bike has the folding mechanism but it would have been nice if they’d have managed it.
Rented a pretty decent Scott. Did some nice mixed terrain but only for a day. Firstly it was great fun. Hard to get away from that. The pedalling felt good. It was like everything was a slight downhill. You can pootle or give it a few hard pedals and fly along at any time. On the flat, uphill, on bumpy grass, all felt like downs once you pedaled a lttle. Good connection between the pedalling and the movement. Smooth delivery. It just took the terrain and slope out of the equation. Could’ve easily got away with less power. It would be an expensive buy. This one was 3.5k but kitted out like a £500 halfords special. Once the price comes down they will be everywhere.
My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.
Mountain biking is all about having fun, right? About getting out there, enjoying the great outdoors, exercising your body and freeing your mind. So what if we told you there was a type of bike that lets you ride further, faster, and have even more fun? One that even made you LOL on the climbs? You’d still have to work for your rewards, but by assisting your efforts, it allowed you to wring every little drop of enjoyment out of your rides.
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