Rachel L. Davis is an avid bicyclist. But as a working mother of two, with a third child on the way, she doesn’t have time for long bike rides. “In my world, getting my exercise has to be part of my daily life,” says Davis, 36, who owns a marketing strategy company based in Washington. “I live in a hilly part of D.C., and as I’ve become more pregnant, more tired with more children, I don’t have as much energy to be biking 40 miles or biking to Alexandria.”

DRIVE MOTOR  The EcoBike is powered by an innovative hub-mounted, brushless permanent magnet motor with a triple planetary gear drive system and proprietary heat resistant materials.  The propulsion system delivers the highest torque and is the quietest in its class.  The drive motor is nominally rated for continuous output at 360 watts (Elegance & Adventure) and 290 watts (Vatavio).

Stark Drive has always included a front head light by default at no charge for safety with the rear brake light being optional for those who needed this. Now we have reconfigured the homepage so that the rear headlight options i clearly visible and availble without needing to compllicate matters by adding it from our accessories page. We highly recommend a rear brake light no matter what motor you choose for Stark Drive.
Durability. You’re paying a lot of money and a costly investment that lasts for a short time is not worthwhile. The electric bike has more components than the common bike, adding the electric motor and the battery; more attention should be put in selection of the bike because of this. You don’t want your electric bike to turn into a regular bike in a short period.

EcoBike offers a state of the art battery and frame design, and artfully combines the highest quality parts from the most competitive manufacturers – Shimano, SRAM, and Cionlli, to name a few. The result is a masterpiece in convenience, reliability, and style. Combining style with functionality, EcoBike is a world-renowned designer of quality electric bicycles, sold all over Europe and North America.

The Gazelle was made for city commutes - the riding position is relaxed yet so upright, you can look around, over car roofs and feel confident even in heavy traffic. The Orange is no fly-weight, though. With its rudimentary suspension fork, Post Moderne suspension seat-post, rack-mounted battery and "built for comfort" wheels, it’s 24.4kg weight (plus battery) excludes it from being regularly carried up-stairs or into flats for commuters who don’t have street-level entry or a bike store.
Simplicity powers the Gtech model, available in either a 20-inch “sports” crossbar frame or a 17-inch “city” step-through option. From using a carbon belt drive to a gearless system that allows a computer to adjust speed while pedaling, not only has Gtech streamlined the e-bike process, but they’ve also dropped the price to just north of $1,000. At a range of about 30 miles, this 35-pound bike offers a humble introduction to e-bikes.
E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque and others are quieter. But generally all four make good options. Look for motor output (in watts) which will give you an idea of total power. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a better figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a truer reflection of power.
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