As these fat tire bikes have showed up at hunting shows over the last year, I have viewed them more with curiosity than anything, but I as I considered how they might fit into my bowhunting, I am about to take the plunge. I bowhunt whitetails on public land in several states each year, and that often involves getting way back into a property to get away from the crowds. For example, I have found a location where I have killed a couple of mature bucks on public land in Kansas, but it’s a walk of more than 1.5 miles. That’s a long haul before daylight and after dark. Once I shoot a big buck back in there, the distance seems to become even longer.

I received my ALL TERRAIN 750 right before my month long Colorado archery deer and elk hunt. I was able to quietly get in to places in 15 minutes that used to take me over an hour to hike in! If you are a serious hunter that wants to get away from the crowds to hunt then you NEED one of these bikes. I did a ton of research and comparing and M2S hands down has the best bike / customer service for the price, period!
Electric bikes are generally heavier than normal bikes. This is due to the battery packs and additional motors which usually makes them about 20 pounds heavier. The weight of the bike can mean better traction in downhill and better stability to the ground, while on the other end, they can make them hard to maneuver with on flat grounds. Therefore, the weight of the bike you get should be based on how and where you intend to use it. The best one to get should be one that is heavy yet have a motor that is powerful enough to support the weight.
Do you like the fat-tire type of bikes? This is a classy electric bike with the fat tires to move smoothly on all terrains. Second, to this, the bike has been built to suit both kids and adults. This is because it can support up to 360 lbs of weight. In addition to this, the elegant E-bike has durable and sturdy aluminum frames for longer services.
Nakto electric bike comes with two styles of frame, both for man and a step-though frame for women. Equipped with Shimano 6 speed derailleur, the 6-speed gear system allows you to reach up to a 25mph top speed. Nakto City E-Bike is affordable, but it’s got a lot of features that are found on more expensive models. You can switch between pedal assist and twist-and-go settings and engage the motor with just a flip of a switch when you need an extra push.
The Surly Big Easy is the Cadillac of the bike lane. The company’s new longtail e-cargo bike exudes a “they don’t make ’em like this anymore” stature, thanks to a beefed-up chromoly steel frame rolling on tough 26x2.5-inch tires. And because it’s a class 1 e-bike, you can actually ride it in the bike lane, too. The 7-foot-long, 67-pound bike won’t play well with your third-floor walk-up, so it’s best to think of it as a car supplement or replacement—that’s what Surly intended, anyway, as evidenced by the $5,000 price tag. However, if you’re ready to commit to the cargo bike life, you’ll struggle to find a stronger platform for achieving bike commuter nirvana.
Fast and fun on the trail, the SDURO HardNine handles rough terrain with ease, while its large tires roll over most obstacles without missing a beat. The pedal assist makes for quick, energy-saving climbing and the bike descends surprisingly well, too. Its front suspension provides a nice level of cushion on bumpy trails and while we missed having a full-suspension on this model, that would have added additional weight and costs. 

Mountain biking is all about having fun, right? About getting out there, enjoying the great outdoors, exercising your body and freeing your mind. So what if we told you there was a type of bike that lets you ride further, faster, and have even more fun? One that even made you LOL on the climbs? You’d still have to work for your rewards, but by assisting your efforts, it allowed you to wring every little drop of enjoyment out of your rides. Are electric mountain bikes allowed on trails?

Vitus’ E-Sommet VR is a great introduction to the industry’s leading electric mountain platforms, offering riders an all-encompassing Enduro bike that’s a fraction of the cost of other high-end options. On top of the bike’s great-looking hydroformed aluminum silhouette, seamless battery integration, and aggressive frame geometry, riders are treated to a robust Shimano XT and SLX groupset, DT Swiss wheels, and a selection of Nukeproof peripherals. At its core, a SHIMANO STEPS E8000 eMTB motor system provides effortless ascent capabilities, thanks to three different riding modes, a fast-charging battery architecture, and a low, centralized position that makes navigating even the harshest trails a lackadaisical affair.


It wasn't all gold stars for the Bulls, however, as the larger battery storage of this bike makes it the heaviest in our test. This heavyweight rig is far from nimble or agile, giving it a more one-dimensional performance on the descents, and hampering its climbing abilities in technical sections or tight corners. Its charging port is also recessed into the frame making it one of the least user-friendly, and while we did like their e-bike controls, they couldn't quite match the ergonomics or display of some of the competition. Overall, we had a blast riding the E-Stream EVO AM 4, read on to find out how it compares.
Unlike the manual mountain bikes where you would have to fully rely on pedaling, electric mountain bikes depend on an electric charge. As expected, the bike has a battery, which often determines how far one can go on a single charge. A good electric mountain bike should have a good storage capacity. Although most mountain bikes have nearly the same battery storage capacity, it is not uncommon to find one that falls below par. It is also good to know how it performs and uses the battery under different weather conditions terrain and depending on the rider’s weight.
E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque, and others, like Bosch’s Active Line, are nearly silent. But, generally, all four make good options. Look for motor output (in torque), which will give you an idea of total power. Just like car engines, more torque equals more power off the line and more boost to your pedaling. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a more important figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a more accurate reflection of power (higher Wh equals bigger range).
Ancheer has become an icon in electric bikes and this mountain bike has earned itself a spot as the best electric mountain bike to ever grace the market. The electric bike comes equipped with a 250 Wat motor and a 36-Volt removable battery that pushes this bike to the extreme. It has an amazing pedal assist functionality which makes it an excellent bike for outdoor and leisure riding.
With its steep seat tube angle and powerful motor, the Rotwild E+ Ultra masters even the steepest climbs. Its high centre of gravity, however, negatively effects downhill handling. The GIANT FULL E+ 0 is a very solid eMTB where what you see is what you get, although the rather slack seat tube and bulbous-belly isn’t exactly pretty. Not so with the FOCUS SAM²: With its clean silhouette it is a bike for design lovers. But only if you get by with the small integrated battery. As soon as you mount an additional battery, not only the appearance suffers, but also the handling. The BMC Trailfox AMP has minor weaknesses in the componentry, finish and downhill handling – at a price of € 12,000 we expected considerably more. The Thömus Lightrider E1 fares better, it’s no bargain either, but the handling is outstanding. It’s a pity that the bike isn’t available outside of Switzerland. Another exotic specimen is the FANTIC XF1 Integra Enduro 160. The bike from the Italian motorcycle brand can’t deny its roots, tremendously composed and capable on the descents, though it cannot keep up with the competition when going back up – the 180 mm version of the Fantic is significantly better overall.
The gears don't seem to keep up on this bike. There are 21 gears, same as my other bike, but there is much more resistance at the highest gear on my other bike going 20mph than there is on this bike. The reason that is an issue is that during pedal assist, the bike goes pretty quick and I don't want to be pedaling air, I want some, just a little, resistance. I don't know the mechanics of it or how this would be the case, perhaps because this bike has smaller wheels than my other bike? The bike came pretty well adjusted on the derailleurs. I haven't touched the back but the front I've had to mess with a little. The chain fell off outboard once, so had to adjust. Chain guard did its job well. The chain got stuck pretty good, but once I loosed the chain guard everything was easily moved.
While it was agile and quicker handling, the Specialized Turbo Levo Comp didn't run away from the competition in this rating metric due to the somewhat abrupt pedal assist cutoff that occurred the moment you stop pedaling. This power cutoff caused awkward moves in slower technical uphill sections when jockeying pedals to avoid rock strikes. The Bulls E-Stream had power for days and could mash its way up just about anything, but its overall weight and size made it a little more awkward in slower or more technical sections of climbing. The Trek Powerfly had a long wheelbase, reach, and chainstay length, giving the bike a long rear end that kept impressive traction while climbing as long as you kept your momentum, the overall length of the bike, however, made it a little tougher to negotiate in the tighter stuff.

I haven't quite figured the brakes out yet. The back brake has a lot of rubbing on one brake pad (outboard). I've gone through YouTube and have done everything short of taking the brake pads out and adjusting the springs. Not sure what I'm going to do about it yet. Disk brakes work great though. I do have some annoying squealing but it is probably on me for not having it adjusted right.
This is a list of the best performing, best value electric bikes for 2018 / 2019. For each category I list two models, the first recommendation is based on performance and the second is based on affordability. As you explore the list and get to know EBR, check out the ebike community forum for more personalized feedback. Share your height, weight, budget and intended use (along with bikes you like) to get advice from actual owners and moderators.
The newest electric mountain bike from Ancheer provides the joy of mountain biking with some advanced features that make it more enjoyable and let the riders to have the control of their rides. At less than $800 price and with mid-range features, it may not compete with the XF800 or BAFAG models, but it provides good value for the money, nonetheless. What is the best electric mountain bike?
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