Cost: Good e-bikes are not cheap, and unlike most bikes, the costs associated with owning an e-bike don’t end when you hand over your credit card in exchange for a shiny new steed. The average cost of operating an electric bike is around $390 a year, including maintenance and charging. You’re also likely to need to change the batteries every 3-5 years so factor that into your costs.
Cape Fear Community College students are utilizing the E-BikeKit™ electric bike kit in the designing and building of their own electric bicycles!   ORIGINAL ARTICLE POSTED by the Port City Daily staff "CFCC student-built electric bikes to be in Azalea Fest parade Some innovative designs by Cape Fear Community College students will be featured in this year’s N.C. Azalea Festival. For the past year, students in CFCC’s mechanical engineering program have been hard...
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Written by Gaston Daigle. Gaston is an admin and key contributor at the popular Endless Sphere Technology Forum Batteries and battery packs, the lifeblood of your electric bicycle Plug and play?... not always that easy and certainly not very simple for most of us.. or is it? A good Lithium battery pack can cost as much, and often even more than the rest of your electric bike kit. Picking the right...
Patriot DreamE has motor cut-off brake levers and lighted battery indicator on the throttle. Some electric bikes have small tires which perform best on smooth streets. The DreamE has full size, 26" wheels for a safe and comfortable ride. Patriot customers have a choice of color, frame size (standard or small), seat style (contour or velo), motor power (350 / 500 / 750 watts), and battery chemistry (LFP).
E-bikes use rechargeable batteries, electric motors and some form of control. Battery systems in use include sealed lead-acid (SLA), nickel-cadmium (NiCad), nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) or lithium-ion polymer (Li-ion). Batteries vary according to the voltage, total charge capacity (amp hours), weight, the number of charging cycles before performance degrades, and ability to handle over-voltage charging conditions. The energy costs of operating e-bikes are small, but there can be considerable battery replacement costs. The lifespan of a battery pack varies depending on the type of usage. Shallow discharge/recharge cycles will help extend the overall battery life.
Riding position: You also may wish to check out an e-bike’s riding position before investing in it. For short trips, the riding position might not make much difference, but for long journeys, the upright "Dutch" style with pulled-back handlebars is very comfortable – particularly for tall riders. The same goes for mountain bike styles, though these bikes are not often designed to actually go off-road.
After you decide which style of e-bike you want, consider the class. In the US, there are three classes defined by the type of assist and how fast the motor will propel you. Most electric bikes sold are class 1 or 3. Class 1 bikes have a motor (max 750w) that assists while you're pedaling, up to 20 mph. Class 3, also known as “speed pedelec” can also have up to a 750w motor, but it can assist you up to 28mph. Both of those are allowed in most states and cities without license. Class 2 have throttles that don't require you to pedal to get a boost. They're allowed on most streets, bike lanes, and paths, but less popular than the other classes and not covered much here (because we still love to pedal and the greater distances pedal assist bikes can cover).
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