The Pivot Shuttle breaks the e-mountain bike mold. It’s Shimano Di2-equipped and features a carbon fiber frame with 140mm of rear travel, a 150mm fork, and a 150mm dropper post. A Shimano STePS e8000 drive unit, paired with a 500Wh battery, provides 20 mph of pedal assist, so you can skip the lift line when you hit the bike park and zip right to the good stuff. The 27.5-inch wheels are nimble and eat up nearly anything in their path, and the massive 2.8-inch tires have huge knobs that grip the trail like Velcro.
Other than your battery indicator all other info is shown on your display. In terms of position of display it looks ok. You can scroll around using +/- buttons on left side of your handlebar. It isn’t super ergonomic but still better than Haibike in terms of ease of use. The display can be removed so you won’t need to worry about it when you park your e-bike outside.
So I think that we can agree that e-bikes are definitely not cheap. Why not just go for an electric scooter then? Well electric bikes do have a lot of advantages. First, most of the people have been familiar with the concept of riding a bicycle since they were kids. So there is basically no learning curve with electric bikes. And you don’t have to worry about looking stupid, or getting pulled over just so the policeman could see what the heck you are riding. Second, you can ride electric bike just like a regular bike, just turn off the electric motor/assistance. Third, unlike many electric scooters that are designed for flat surfaces, quality electric bicycles are often created with tires that can withstand a higher amount of roughness, for example electric dirt bikes.
While it was agile and quicker handling, the Specialized Turbo Levo Comp didn't run away from the competition in this rating metric due to the somewhat abrupt pedal assist cutoff that occurred the moment you stop pedaling. This power cutoff caused awkward moves in slower technical uphill sections when jockeying pedals to avoid rock strikes. The Bulls E-Stream had power for days and could mash its way up just about anything, but its overall weight and size made it a little more awkward in slower or more technical sections of climbing. The Trek Powerfly had a long wheelbase, reach, and chainstay length, giving the bike a long rear end that kept impressive traction while climbing as long as you kept your momentum, the overall length of the bike, however, made it a little tougher to negotiate in the tighter stuff.
The Altitude Powerplay is one of three bikes on this list (Specialized Turbo Levo and Liv Intrigue E+ are the others) to use a custom motor. The Dyname 3.0 motor offers 100Nm of torque and is also compact enough that Rocky can use the same geometry and suspension-pivot placement as an unplugged Altitude, so the Powerplay feels more like an unplugged bike than most e-bikes. With the motor off it rides like a standard, albeit heavy, trail bike. The motor responds more quickly than some of the more popular systems and the increased torque offers increased acceleration, which, depending on the trail situation, can be welcome or a hindrance.
The bike shows greater terrain adaptability with the 300W brushless motor and 36V Li-ion battery. The 6-speed Shimano gears provide further range variation. You can select any one from the five levels of PAS but the level one or two assist is perfect for cycling on most tracks. Be careful that there will be little pedal resistance at higher levels. You can also twist the variable speed throttle instead of selecting the pedal assistance.
I bought this bike with intended use on my hunting farms. I’ve ridden it now off road several times, and to say I’m blown away, is an understatement. This bike simply blew me away on all fronts. The motor is super strong and pulls me around great. I’m 6’2 210 so I’m not a small guy either. Like others have said, if this thing doesn’t make you smile the first time you ride it, you’re just not a happy person!!!!
The frame is constructed of 6061 aluminum that’s more responsive with some bit of flex to it. A step-thru design makes getting on and off a breeze. The frame supports a more upright posture for improved comfort and visibility. A front fork suspension and rear spring suspension make for a smooth ride on uneven surfaces. It actually adds an aggressive look to the overall design.
When you need a great electric mountain bike that will assure you of a longer runtime, you need to get this. The Cyclamatic Power Plus Electric bike comes with a powerful 36V lithium-ion battery. This works for up to 28 miles range; hence very convenient. Besides this, the e-bike also has a stylish design, which makes it ideal for riders. It can be used by 14 years and above. The bike also has large wheels, which makes it move with a lot of ease. It can maneuver easily on all terrains to assure you of an excellent and smooth ride.
Looking for a ride that’ll have you hauling a$# in and out of the woods virtually without making a sound? You want the QuietKat 750W Ranger FatKat Hub Motor Fat Tire bike. It’s got a powerful 750w rear hub motor that can get up to 19MPH unassisted, and even quicker if you help by pedaling. Its mid-drive system is sealed for a quiet ride and to protect the motor from rainy, snowy, or muddy conditions.
Electric bicycles offer the same great benefits as traditional bicycles and remove many of the roadblocks and challenges that people face with traditional pedal-powered bikes. With help of an electric motor you can get where you need to be faster, climb hills effortlessly and significantly reduce your carbon footprint. Also e-bikes don’t require registration, license plates, or insurance. So how come the electric bikes are have not taken over the world by now? The real problem—even now that e-bikes have been available for years—is cost.

As I said before, going up hills might require some pedaling, but it is SO MUCH EASIER with the motor running. I feel like a higher voltage is used on level 3 pedal assist than can be gotten just using the hand turn, though. It takes a few pedals for the pedal assist to kick in which can be annoying, but it does save some battery on initial acceleration. You also have to be careful pedaling around to park the bike or at a street corner waiting for traffic because you DO NOT want the motor to kick in and send you into a workbench or worse ... oncoming traffic.


Carry Extra Gear - They are built to carry 300lbs and if that’s not enough the trailers can carry an additional 100lbs so you can make it one quick effortless trip in and out instead of a tiring back and forth lugging heavy gear on your back.  Plus the bunch of other accessories available like rear racks and waterproof saddle bags for extra storage on the bike and not on your back.
The aluminum, step-through eJoy is the happy medium between traditional-looking townies that don’t transport much more than the rider and often-cumbersome cargo models that are challenging to store. With 26-inch wheels, full fenders, a Shimano Alivio nine-speed drivetrain and disc brakes, a wheelbase similar to the average townie, and a big, comfy seat, it has the appearance of a practical everyday cruiser. But its oversize rear rack, silent Bosch Active Line motor, heavy-duty head tube with front-tray mounts (the tray is an add-on), integrated Supernova E3 lights, and roll-over-anything balloon tires hurtle it into hmm-this-could-actually-replace-my-car status. It’s one of the quietest, most convenient, most stylish, and easiest-to-operate e-bikes available.

The motor is powerful enough to allow you to hit up to 35kmh on a 10.4ah battery that stays alive for 50km. With the fat Kenda tires and suspension fork, the bike does not need any pedal assistance to smoothly roll on even surfaces. The PAS provides five levels of assistance and even the first level is quite powerful. The fifth level will just blow you away with speed and torque and there is no way that you can pedal fast enough to meet any resistance.


With its steep seat tube angle and powerful motor, the Rotwild E+ Ultra masters even the steepest climbs. Its high centre of gravity, however, negatively effects downhill handling. The GIANT FULL E+ 0 is a very solid eMTB where what you see is what you get, although the rather slack seat tube and bulbous-belly isn’t exactly pretty. Not so with the FOCUS SAM²: With its clean silhouette it is a bike for design lovers. But only if you get by with the small integrated battery. As soon as you mount an additional battery, not only the appearance suffers, but also the handling. The BMC Trailfox AMP has minor weaknesses in the componentry, finish and downhill handling – at a price of € 12,000 we expected considerably more. The Thömus Lightrider E1 fares better, it’s no bargain either, but the handling is outstanding. It’s a pity that the bike isn’t available outside of Switzerland. Another exotic specimen is the FANTIC XF1 Integra Enduro 160. The bike from the Italian motorcycle brand can’t deny its roots, tremendously composed and capable on the descents, though it cannot keep up with the competition when going back up – the 180 mm version of the Fantic is significantly better overall.
I bought this bike with intended use on my hunting farms. I’ve ridden it now off road several times, and to say I’m blown away, is an understatement. This bike simply blew me away on all fronts. The motor is super strong and pulls me around great. I’m 6’2 210 so I’m not a small guy either. Like others have said, if this thing doesn’t make you smile the first time you ride it, you’re just not a happy person!!!!
Despite it's prodigious descending talents the short (426mm) chainstays make tight corners and lifting the front end easy. That also makes flying through flow trails and popping off rocks a staple of the Altitude's arsenal. With uncompromised suspension and geometry, a powerful motor and big battery, and excellent trail manners, the Rocky offers a compellingly unique e-package that performs well in all situations.
Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position. 

It's finally here: The 2019 E-MOUNTAINBIKE Print Edition, our timeless annual issue! Consisting of around 240 (!) pages, the 2019 E-MOUNTAINBIKE Print Editon offers a ton of inspiration, buyers advice, and eMTB know-how as well as reviews of the hottest bikes of the year. Our premium magazine is aimed at experienced eMTBers and beginners alike. Click here for more information (new window) or order it directly in our shop or on Amazon.de!
The Pivot Shuttle breaks the e-mountain bike mold. It’s Shimano Di2-equipped and features a carbon fiber frame with 140mm of rear travel, a 150mm fork, and a 150mm dropper post. A Shimano STePS e8000 drive unit, paired with a 500Wh battery, provides 20 mph of pedal assist, so you can skip the lift line when you hit the bike park and zip right to the good stuff. The 27.5-inch wheels are nimble and eat up nearly anything in their path, and the massive 2.8-inch tires have huge knobs that grip the trail like Velcro.
On the road, it takes only a few turns of the pedals to activate the Vado’s motor and get it up to speed. In Turbo mode — the bike’s highest level of pedal-assist — the Vado reaches speeds of up to 28 miles per hour, after which the electric drive system automatically shuts off to conserve power (and abide by local law). A built-in LED readout on the handlebars allows riders to monitor battery life, check current speed, and track calories burned while also being able to glance at distance traveled. The Turbo Vado Mission Control app (iOS/Android) also connects to the bike via Bluetooth and allows riders to further tune their ride and adjust the bike’s settings.
Merax Aluminum electric mountain bike is an excellent option if you are looking for a lightweight frame bike and a good suspension for smooth riding. This mountain ebike has standard Shimano 7 speed gears. Merax Aluminum electric mountain bike can develop the speed of maximum 32 km/h. The electric bike has a 350W high-speed motor and removable 36V 8.8Ah Lithium Battery. The battery allows you to ride a bike for up to 28 miles with a single charge of it. This electric mountain bike is also an excellent choice for those who are looking for an ergonomic design.
Firstly this is not a motorcycle. I bought this to use as a daily commuter.I now have 1000 + miles on it. The pedal assist works fine and may be ok for leisurely riding but I just use the throttle and pedal. This is a great bike. Strong frame and wheels. Been in two crashes and no damage. The tires are nice off road tires and now live on my daughters mountain bike. I switched them out for high pressure road tires. Forget about the horn and light. They don't work. I am 6'1" 32" inseam and had to buy a longer seatpost($30) to fit this frame. 13miles each way commute. Battery life is fine. After the 26 mile round trip it has a little juice left but not enough for another ride to work. I would buy again. 

This electric tricycle features an all electric mode which allows you to ride the trike without the need to pedal, this trike will zip along and get you home in no time, or if you want to pedal it like a traditional tricycle you can switch off the power or select between the 5 progressive power assist modes which add electric power to your pedal power.
E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque, and others, like Bosch’s Active Line, are nearly silent. But, generally, all four make good options. Look for motor output (in torque), which will give you an idea of total power. Just like car engines, more torque equals more power off the line and more boost to your pedaling. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a more important figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a more accurate reflection of power (higher Wh equals bigger range).
What's The Best Electric Mountain Bike?
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