In fact, the manufacturers have already proven that what makes an e-MTB outstanding is not that much different to a regular MTB. Sure, there are slight differences in performance due to e-MTB’s heavier frame but both types share almost similar basics covering geometry, sizing, and balance. Also, the power-supplying motor comes into the forefront instead of the suspension in these bikes.

When it comes to the distance it can cover at a single charge, it really depends. For instance, if you live 13 miles from work and ride on a smooth, flat pavement, the bike has enough power to get you home. The battery level does decrease when the motor is under increased stress—like when you’re riding up a hilly terrain—but it quickly levels itself when you go back riding on a flat road surface.


You can take it to anywhere you like as the bike is perfect for exploring wild trails, discovering the nooks of city streets, and daily commute. The motor produces no noise, so there is no way to disrupt the tranquility of natural trails. The more than 4-inch wide fat tires will roll over even on snowy and sandy tracks. The width of the tires and the full-suspension design will cushion the paths for you and help to cruise through the climbs and bomb down the descents.
Scott's Genius eRIDE 920 is another bike with Shimano's excellent Steps E8000 motor. The narrow width of this motor—same as a standard Shimano mountain bike crank—is a nice feature, as is the support and customization offered by Shimano's e-Tube apps. Boost mode lets you cruise comfortably at up to 20 miles per hour on pavement, while Trail mode doles out torque more smoothly and increases range. But compared to the Bosch in e-mtb mode (comparable to Shimano's Trail mode), Shimano's faster and harder hitting torque is less desirable for navigating technical terrain. The 29-inch wheels and 150mm of travel provide the ability to straight-line some really gnarly stuff. This bike is meant for riding big and riding hard. The big travel, long trail, and slack head angle give you a bike that loves to go straight and gobble up rowdy trails. And despite being such a long bike, it still handles technical terrain well.
While we liked the value, component specification, and versatile all-around performance of the Trance E+ 2, it wasn't all gold stars. E-bikes are heavy, that is a given, but the Trance is a little heavier than most at 52 lbs 3 oz. This weight is one of the reasons this bike feels somewhat sluggish at times, especially in low-speed sections of trail. It also has mediocre e-bike controls. Sure, they are functional, but the all-in-one control's display in the form of small LED lights is difficult to see by the left grip and near impossible to read when riding in bright light conditions. Beyond that, we feel the Trance E+ 2 is a quality e-bike offered at a reasonable price.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs.

The bike is powered by a Bafang 750-watt hub drive motor that is rather impressive for its size.  A large digital display will give you all the vital readouts that you need while blazing down the trail.  A 300-pound carrying capacity will let you bring home big game without slowing you down.  This eBike comes in two different colors that includes charcoal or camo.  This model has a rigid front fork.
Scott’s Genius eRIDE 920 is another bike with Shimano’s excellent Steps E8000 motor. The narrow width of this motor—same as a standard Shimano mountain bike crank—is a nice feature, as is the support and customization offered by Shimano’s e-Tube apps. Boost mode lets you cruise comfortably at up to 20 miles per hour on pavement, while Trail mode doles out torque more smoothly and increases range. But compared to the Bosch in e-mtb mode (comparable to Shimano's Trail mode), Shimano’s faster and harder-hitting torque is less desirable for navigating technical terrain. The 29-inch wheels and 150mm of travel provide the ability to straight-line some really gnarly stuff. This bike is meant for riding big and riding hard. The big travel, long trail, and slack head angle give you a bike that loves to go straight and gobble up rowdy trails. And despite being such a long bike, it still handles technical terrain well.
Anybody can work on electric bikes, even you: No need to learn about compression or carburetor turning, replacing parts of an engine or even mixing fuel. Anyone who can work on pedal bikes can maintain an electric hunting bike- no special licensing or degree required. If you don’t know how to work on bikes, you can learn how to pretty quickly. Moreover, replacing parts like a controller or motor on an e-bike is much easier than changing the crank or cylinder on a gas-powered engine, so long-term maintenance is much easier, too.
Over the last few years, I’ve taken my love of the outdoors, hiking, skiing, trekking and exploring to the next level by starting this site. I started a bike shop in Denver, CO, and have seen amazing growth over the last few years. Getting paid to do what I love has been a dream come true for me. That’s also what led me to start BikesReviewed.com. In my shop, I spend a large amount of time helping people find the perfect bike for them and the style of biking they’re going to be doing. It only made sense that I expanded my reach and got online, making it possible for me to help people all over the world. If biking and staying fit is your priority, too, you’ve come to the right place.
Despite it's prodigious descending talents the short (426mm) chainstays make tight corners and lifting the front end easy. That also makes flying through flow trails and popping off rocks a staple of the Altitude's arsenal. With uncompromised suspension and geometry, a powerful motor and big battery, and excellent trail manners, the Rocky offers a compellingly unique e-package that performs well in all situations.

Mountain bikes have occupied a small niche in bowhunting for many years, but they have never gone mainstream. These bikes are not made for hunting and therefore must be modified, and their use is limited to certain terrains. That said, the growth in popularity of fat tire bikes has been quite remarkable, and I suppose it was only a matter of time before they made a serious move at the hunting market.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs. How do you ride an electric mountain bike?
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