Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.
As I said before, going up hills might require some pedaling, but it is SO MUCH EASIER with the motor running. I feel like a higher voltage is used on level 3 pedal assist than can be gotten just using the hand turn, though. It takes a few pedals for the pedal assist to kick in which can be annoying, but it does save some battery on initial acceleration. You also have to be careful pedaling around to park the bike or at a street corner waiting for traffic because you DO NOT want the motor to kick in and send you into a workbench or worse ... oncoming traffic.
Now that we have learned all about the amazing eBikes that are perfect for hunting, we will take a look at some handy bike trailers.  As a hunter, you know all too well that you probably can’t fit all your gear on your eBike so having a bike trailer to help bring your gear up the trail is vital.  Additionally, these trailers made by QuietKat and Rambo are great for bringing back big game such as deer. 

Wide tyres are an absolute must on an eMTB. They offer more traction, provide extra comfort, increase stability, and they simply look cooler. Tyres with a width of 2.5″ – 2.8″ have proven to be the ideal size. The performance of the MAXXIS Minion tyres is particularly impressive; they provide the best grip and stability. To get the best performance, tyres should be ridden at approx. 1.2 – 1.6 bar air pressure.
Electric bikes are here in a big way. Liberated from some of the normal constraints of standard bike design like weight and gearing, e-bike design has exploded; if you can imagine it, someone has built it. From cargo bikes to city bikes, messenger bikes to mountain bikes, road bikes, folding bikes, and even beach cruisers, there is something for everyone. The beauty of e-bikes is that they make the joy of cycling accessible to so many people in so many ways. See at-a-glance reviews below of five of our top-rated e-bikes, or scroll deeper for full reviews of these and other high-ranking options, plus more buying info.

Seven batteries keep you powered without adding much bulk to the bike. These state-of-the-art lithium batteries are built to last up to 10 years. A single charge provides a range of 20 to 25 miles. It takes just 4 hours to reach full charge. The battery pack mounts to the frame and sits directly beneath the seat making it less noticeable. 300W motor with variable speed throttle provides powerful propulsion to achieve a speed of up to 20 mph.
Despite it's prodigious descending talents the short (426mm) chainstays make tight corners and lifting the front end easy. That also makes flying through flow trails and popping off rocks a staple of the Altitude's arsenal. With uncompromised suspension and geometry, a powerful motor and big battery, and excellent trail manners, the Rocky offers a compellingly unique e-package that performs well in all situations.

The ECOTRIC Fat Tire electric bike ticks all the boxes for potential and pro mountain bikers alike. It is designed for and therefore equipped to deal with any number of different terrains including the beach and dirt roads also. Consequently, you can take the bike with you anywhere with ease and the comfort of knowing it won’t let you down as it goes, not just on your mountain biking adventures!
The bike looks a no different than a regular mountain bike. The 36 V, 8Ah Li-Ion battery is very cleverly designed and disguised as a thermos, so you will not be able to tell whether this is an e-bicycle or a regular one unless you get really close. It is very nicely build, and pretty sturdy; the frame is 100% alloy and the front fork is made with high-grade carbon steel. The bike itself weighs about 45 lbs.
Scott's Genius eRIDE 920 is another bike with Shimano's excellent Steps E8000 motor. The narrow width of this motor—same as a standard Shimano mountain bike crank—is a nice feature, as is the support and customization offered by Shimano's e-Tube apps. Boost mode lets you cruise comfortably at up to 20 miles per hour on pavement, while Trail mode doles out torque more smoothly and increases range. But compared to the Bosch in e-mtb mode (comparable to Shimano's Trail mode), Shimano's faster and harder hitting torque is less desirable for navigating technical terrain. The 29-inch wheels and 150mm of travel provide the ability to straight-line some really gnarly stuff. This bike is meant for riding big and riding hard. The big travel, long trail, and slack head angle give you a bike that loves to go straight and gobble up rowdy trails. And despite being such a long bike, it still handles technical terrain well.
Scott’s Genius eRIDE 920 is another bike with Shimano’s excellent Steps E8000 motor. The narrow width of this motor—same as a standard Shimano mountain bike crank—is a nice feature, as is the support and customization offered by Shimano’s e-Tube apps. Boost mode lets you cruise comfortably at up to 20 miles per hour on pavement, while Trail mode doles out torque more smoothly and increases range. But compared to the Bosch in e-mtb mode (comparable to Shimano's Trail mode), Shimano’s faster and harder-hitting torque is less desirable for navigating technical terrain. The 29-inch wheels and 150mm of travel provide the ability to straight-line some really gnarly stuff. This bike is meant for riding big and riding hard. The big travel, long trail, and slack head angle give you a bike that loves to go straight and gobble up rowdy trails. And despite being such a long bike, it still handles technical terrain well.
This is a compact bike that can be assembled and reassembled quickly and easily, though it might take a few attempts to practice. It has a range when fully charged of just under 30 miles, which is at the higher end of standard when it comes to electric bikes. It has quite a powerful motor at 250W which only adds to how smooth the ride is when using this bike. 

As someone who owns both a Quest and Rift S I think this article misses the mark in a few areas: While the Quest technically has a higher resolution, it is a pentile display and as such is is more prone to godrays, glare and SDE. The overall resolution of the Rift S is lower but it has an RGB stripe display with more subpixels so side by side it actually looks sharper. Quest has 4 tracking cameras, Rift S has 5 so the overall area it can scan is greater and this makes a difference, especially in games where you lift your arms up and above your head. In order to move the data over the USB C wire the image will be compressed at the sides so it won't be as sharp or well defined as what you will see in the Rift S. In my experience, the Rift S refresh rate of 80hz is really the bottom end for comfortable VR experiences. When playing games that support cross buy or watching videos, I still experience discomfort on the Quest (especially during fast movement) whereas the same content feels perfect comfortable on my Rift S and even PSVR. This is more of a personal preference thing but I find the Rift S halo design far, far more comfortable to extended sessions that the Quest scuba mask design. So while it's impressive that the Quest will soon become a hybrid VR headset, let's not get carried away and just ignore its shortcomings and limitations. For the best PCVR experience a dedicated PCVR headset is still the way to go.

Rambo and Felt offer bikes with electric assist motors. The lithium ion batteries give you speeds of up to 20 mph and will travel 19 miles between charges on motor use alone. You can use the motor as a pedal assist if you like, which will give you even more distance on a battery. Sweating up a steep hill? Just switch on the motor for some assistance. There is some question about using the electric power on properties where no motorized vehicles are allowed, but a representative from Rambo told me the bike has been okayed by several state wildlife agencies.
The adjustable front shock offers smooth cushioning and buffers the jerks when cycling on uneven surfaces. However, the rear shock is rigid and hard to move. The Shimano 21-gear shifters will allow you to enjoy great speed with a maximum of 20mph. But, it would be better to have at least 24 gears at that speed, because you will feel almost no resistance when cycling at the max speed in the highest gear.

You can explore the pleasure of mountain biking with the three levels of pedal assistance – High, Medium, and Low – and you can select them from the handlebar controls. The 21-speed Shimano shifters will help you to dominate various trails but it would be better to have 24 gears because it’s hard to keep up with the pedaling at the 15mph maximum speed.


The Espin is powered by a 350-watt motor that’s rated for trips up to 50 miles (depending on the terrain and assist level). Once depleted, the battery fully charges in roughly five hours. Thankfully, Espin makes it easy to remove the battery, allowing you to quickly recharge it at home or in the office between trips. A backlit LCD control hub displays your basic metrics and battery life while in transit and LED headlights add a touch of light when needed.
Basically, there is no reason to ride an eMTB with less than 130 mm of travel. With classic bikes, more travel usually means both less efficiency and poorer climbing characteristics, but this is not true with eMTBs – at least not up to a certain point. The best example is the Specialized Turbo Levo, which with its 135 mm of travel at the rear handles much better than most of the other, longer travel bikes in the group test. Also, eMTBs with suspension travel of 180 mm or more are often noticeably less efficient, as clearly exemplified in this test by the Haibike XDURO Nduro. It climbs a lot slower than other bikes using the same motor and the same level of assistance, an experience you will find with almost all other long-travel bikes from other manufacturers. The exception is the BULLS E-CORE EVO EN Di2: in direct comparison, it climbs a lot more efficiently, even though it also offers 180 mm of travel. The ideal compromise between uphill and downhill performance usually lies somewhere between 130 and 160 mm of travel.
To enjoy a great ride for long hours, this durable E-bike is one to try out. This is because the electric bike is powered by the 250W high-speed motor that aids in boosting the speed. Besides this, it has the 21-speed transmission system; hence you can easily shift the speeds to attain a higher speed. In addition to this, has the ideal brakes system that makes it very safe.

It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.

I continued to have issues with the rear brakes. The rear disc brake was bending when I braked and I could not figure out how to get it from rubbing on the pads. I eventually took the bike over to REI and paid for a tune-up. Fantastic work by them, the bike has a better top speed by a couple mph now and shifting/braking are much smoother. I was also having issues with the chain jumping off the front derailleur on high torque (high gear from standstill). Looks like I just needed the experts to give it the tune.
I’ve been wanting to get an electric hunting bike for a while but I’m curious about charging the batteries while out hunting. How long would I need to run a generator for to top off a battery? Would a solar panel even get the job done? Seems like extra batteries might make the most sense. How long would one of these batteries take to charge from empty?
Now that we have learned all about the amazing eBikes that are perfect for hunting, we will take a look at some handy bike trailers.  As a hunter, you know all too well that you probably can’t fit all your gear on your eBike so having a bike trailer to help bring your gear up the trail is vital.  Additionally, these trailers made by QuietKat and Rambo are great for bringing back big game such as deer. 
We’re an e-bike retailer based in Brooklyn, serving NYC, the rest of the US, and several other countries. Propel grew out of the recognition that e-bikes hold the potential to transform transportation as we know it. We’ve dedicated ourselves to bringing that transformation about since our founding in 2011. We’re pioneering a new industry standard that all the electric bikes we sell must meet, educating legislators so e-bike riders will be treated fairly under the law, and guiding consumers away from expensive pitfalls towards their perfect e-bike match.

With so many new electric bicycles on the market, choosing the best while staying on budget can be difficult. Designed for commuting and off-road biking, the ANCHEER Power Plus Electric Mountain Bike is easily one of the most affordable electric bikes out there. In this review, let’s go through its important features and the reasons you might want or might not want to use it.


The newest electric mountain bike from Ancheer provides the joy of mountain biking with some advanced features that make it more enjoyable and let the riders to have the control of their rides. At less than $800 price and with mid-range features, it may not compete with the XF800 or BAFAG models, but it provides good value for the money, nonetheless.
Equipped with a high performance motor, this Ancheer Power Plus electric mountain bike has won accolades for its superior performance and unmatched reliability. It is built with a solid Aluminum alloy frame to keep it strong yet lightweight enough to maneuver with easily. It is everything one would want to get through any terrain and is excellent in every way imaginable.

The above electric mountain bikes are the best selections on the market today. They are safe and durable bikes that will guarantee safe rides. They are also built from strong and sturdy metallic frames to offer long-term service. In addition to this, the electric bikes are ideal for riding on different terrains. This is due to large wheels, which provide smooth rides. They are also user-friendly electric bikes that are
The CIVI Bikes 500w Predator Electric Mountain bike is what your next fishing trip in the woods needs. This bike’s got 4” wide tires for tons of stability, front suspension to take those bumpier parts of the ride, and disc brakes with plenty of safety and stopping power. The 7 speed Shimano hub pairs well with the pedal-assist system to help make your ride easier and last longer.
I continued to have issues with the rear brakes. The rear disc brake was bending when I braked and I could not figure out how to get it from rubbing on the pads. I eventually took the bike over to REI and paid for a tune-up. Fantastic work by them, the bike has a better top speed by a couple mph now and shifting/braking are much smoother. I was also having issues with the chain jumping off the front derailleur on high torque (high gear from standstill). Looks like I just needed the experts to give it the tune.
Nearly anyone can ride them any time, anywhere: Most states allow an electric bike of 750w’s or below to be ridden without a license, whereas most areas won’t allow riders below 18 and/or without a motorcycle license to ride dirt bikes on trails. The fewer riders in your group the more work it is for you, so the ability for any hunter of nearly any age and license to use an electric-bike comes in handy.
This bike comes in black, white or tan and is the only compact folding hunting eBike of the list.  It’s lightweight and compact folding size makes extremely easy to take with you, stick it in the boot of the car and pull it out when you’re ready to enter woods to reach your blind or stand.  It has 20” wheels compared to the standard 26” that the other full size eBikes use.
The newest electric mountain bike from Ancheer provides the joy of mountain biking with some advanced features that make it more enjoyable and let the riders to have the control of their rides. At less than $800 price and with mid-range features, it may not compete with the XF800 or BAFAG models, but it provides good value for the money, nonetheless.
The bike has three speed modes: low, medium and high. The top speed is about 18 miles with motor only and 25 mph with pedaling. The range you can get out of the motor is about 30 miles, but since you can pedal it just like the traditional bike after the battery dies, there is really no limit to how far you can go.  21-speed gear shift system allows you to be in full control of your ride, and front and rear disc brakes protect your safety. The Ancheer electric mountain bike is also equipped with LED headlight and horn.
The class 3 Aventon Pace 500 urban e-bike has five levels of pedal assist and tops out at 28 mph. But the Pace has something not found on a lot of modern e-bikes. In addition to pedal power, it also has a throttle—in the case of the Pace, a small thumb paddle on the left side of the handlebar next to the control unit that holds at a steady 20 mph, no pedaling required. The bike itself has an aluminum frame, a swept-back handlebar, ergo grips, a sturdy kickstand, hydraulic disc brakes, 8-speed Shimano Altus shifting and gearing, 27.5x2.2-inch Kenda e-bike-rated tires, a saddle the size of Texas, and good ol’ classic city/commuter-bike geometry. It doesn’t come equipped with fenders or a rear rack, but you can add them. Power comes in the form of a 500-watt rear-hub motor, a semi-integrated battery on the down tube (with a range of up to 50 miles), and a backlit display unit mounted on the stem.
The charts below show our recommended sizes based on height, but there are some other factors, like arm and leg length, that determine a great fit. That’s why you’ll see some overlap in our recommendations. Not every rider who’s 5´8˝, for example, will fit on the same size bike. The best way to find your perfect fit is to consult the experts at your local Trek retailer.
×