With most ebikes the choice of motor defines aspects of the frame geometry and to a lesser degree the suspension characteristics of the bike. Not with new Rock Mountain Altitude Powerplay. With its bespoke motor Rocky has been able to design an ebike that reflects the ride quality of a highly evolved 150mm trail bike. With instant power pickup, extended battery life and streamline proportions it’s not just the handling of the Rocky that will get you charged up for riding. It’s the best bike in this test by some margin, but we had an issue with the motor momentarily cutting and raising questions over it’s reliability.


Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
Moreover, the E-bike has an LCD display panel for easy and quick control of the bike. With the LED headlight, you will find it excellent for cycling even at night hours. It also features the 160 disc brakes system that provides the best all-weather stopping power. It is a great bike that features the 21- speed gear to boost the hill climbing power. The electric bike also has two working modes that include the pedal assistant mode and E-bike mode.
Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).

Nearly anyone can ride them any time, anywhere: Most states allow an electric bike of 750w’s or below to be ridden without a license, whereas most areas won’t allow riders below 18 and/or without a motorcycle license to ride dirt bikes on trails. The fewer riders in your group the more work it is for you, so the ability for any hunter of nearly any age and license to use an electric-bike comes in handy.

Other than your battery indicator all other info is shown on your display. In terms of position of display it looks ok. You can scroll around using +/- buttons on left side of your handlebar. It isn’t super ergonomic but still better than Haibike in terms of ease of use. The display can be removed so you won’t need to worry about it when you park your e-bike outside.
The ALLMTN 6.0 comes with quality name-branded components in all the most important places and some in-house parts that complete a well-rounded build. But we're a bit disappointed by to see just a 500 Wh battery on a $6,700 bike. A SRAM GX Eagle cassette is paired with the Bosch Performance CX motor so the wide gear range and excellent E-MTB mode enabled motor give you everything you need to get up and down rocky trails. Maxxis DHF and DHRII 2.8" tires offer plenty of grip no matter the conditions and the TRP G-Spec brakes can handle fast and steep trails. The ALLMTN 6.0 has a short 433m reach (M) so is a little less forgiving on the steep stuff but feels more responsive on flatter, slower trails and the 1204mm wheelbase feels stable on most trails. Although it is capable on enduro trails, it is better suited to flowing trails.
The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.

E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque, and others, like Bosch’s Active Line, are nearly silent. But, generally, all four make good options. Look for motor output (in torque), which will give you an idea of total power. Just like car engines, more torque equals more power off the line and more boost to your pedaling. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a more important figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a more accurate reflection of power (higher Wh equals bigger range).
What's The Best Electric Mountain Bike?

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