Not sure if there’s any in Southampton but there’s a couple of specialist electric bike shops in the Brighton area that sell them and they seem happy to let people do test rides. Probably the best way to decide if they’re the right thing for you and what you want to do. Would happily accompany you for a ride round Stanmer if you came over this way for a test.
I’m sat here absolutely knackered after being out this morning for a 3hr session round my local trails, including some much needed trail work which is quite amusing as i tend to stumble and fall on my arse quite a lot but over the past month i have managed to clear pretty much all of my old trails with the aid of a flask of tea, quality tunes on my jambox speaker along with my rake, mini shovel and Silky Zubat saw – I’ve managed to regain that totally exhausted feeling you get at the end of a days riding n” trail grooming so i’m a very happy bunny indeed! – albeit sitting here with aches n’ pains that make me wince if i reach for anything but i wouldn’t have it any other way.

To start off with I love using the bike for work every day, I always used a racing bike for work previous over the last 7 yrs or so, I have had my bike for 4 months now, clocked up 600 miles, in that time it has lost power about 2 times, not a real problem as you reopen the meter, you can be on your way again. I changed the tyres and seat like others did !! I would definitely recommend to friends & Family it's built like a tank very good Quality !!


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We think that the Ancheer Folding Electric Mountain Bike looks (mostly) great. The frame is finished very well and the wheel are striking. The only complaint we have with the looks and the overall design is how they decided to implement the battery pack. The little pouch at the front looks out of place and can feel a bit cumbersome. We would have liked if they could have potentially attached it, or better yet integrated it into the horizontal part of the main frame. I understand the difficulties of doing this as the bike has the folding mechanism but it would have been nice if they’d have managed it.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs.
My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.
yep ..they’re fantastic …one of my best ever buys … stopped biking 3 yrs ago due to suddenly developing pain in both knees ..diagnosed as arthritis . recently bought an ebike to try and make a comeback and believe it or not i’ve lost 10kg and knees are getting better all the time so much so i normally only use the lowest assist setting . Try one ..it’ll put a smile on your face guaranteed!
Yep, there’s no getting away from the fact that i’m peddling a 21kg bike when the assist is switched off but with the massive battery & range there is no real need to switch it off, I can barely turn the pedals on a normal bike when i hit a hill so if i’m on the road and wanting as much range as possible to explore a few of the surrounding trails in my area of Galloway i’m quite happy using the eco mode to get myself around, the tour mode gives a bit more assist and is enough to tackle the majority of single track climbs with effort from myself, the sport mode is enough for all but the steepest of singletrack use and the turbo mode is just batshit mental for all out super steep climbs and so much fun.
Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).
With most ebikes the choice of motor defines aspects of the frame geometry and to a lesser degree the suspension characteristics of the bike. Not with new Rock Mountain Altitude Powerplay. With its bespoke motor Rocky has been able to design an ebike that reflects the ride quality of a highly evolved 150mm trail bike. With instant power pickup, extended battery life and streamline proportions it’s not just the handling of the Rocky that will get you charged up for riding. It’s the best bike in this test by some margin, but we had an issue with the motor momentarily cutting and raising questions over it’s reliability.
I have had my new e bike for about 5 weeks now and covered over 500 miles, it has been an absolute joy - you still get plenty of exercise but in a much more pleasant way than with an ordinary bike, it takes hills in its stride and the ride is very stable and inspires confidence even over rough country roads, the front suspension helps a lot in this respect also the bike is equipped with dual disk brakes. I have fitted mudguards back and front - I had to modify the stays on the front ones by making a right angle bend in them so that they could be attached to the forks, it has proved well worthwhile fitting the mudguards. I have used all assist levels and you can always step to a higher level if the need arises. I can highly recommend this bike and it is my opinion that it would be difficult to find a better e bike for the money - many more expensive machines offer less specification! 

Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position. 

When it comes to the distance it can cover at a single charge, it really depends. For instance, if you live 13 miles from work and ride on a smooth, flat pavement, the bike has enough power to get you home. The battery level does decrease when the motor is under increased stress—like when you’re riding up a hilly terrain—but it quickly levels itself when you go back riding on a flat road surface.
The Hover-1 is a lightweight, portable folding electric scooter meant to add a little bit of fun in your daily transportation. Read our Hover-1 Folding Electric Scooter Review and see if this fun little commuter is for you.A quick glance may trick you into thinking this is a toy for kids, but it’s not. The scooter is designed for use by adults for ...
I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.
Big Bird, you make some great points. One. Where is the line drawn between electric bike and motorcycle. Two. It would allow those who might not be able to enjoy the outdoors mobility. In my opinion I feel electric bikes lean more to the motorcycle side of things. Don't get me wrong, I ride and share certain trails with motos, however not all trails are open to them. Here is where I see the potential for conflict among other user groups with electric bikes. That being said your idea for stickers for the disabled seems to make sense. So now the question is, electric bike or electric motorcycle? How is it defined?

Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
In our view, e-bikes are approaching a crossroads in concept and design. Heading off in one direction are longer travel, enduro-style e-bikes, which are largely designed for cruising up and then blasting back down. Plotting a slightly different course is the idea of a lightweight model that rides much more like a normal mountain bike, but requires more work from the rider. Of the two approaches, both have their benefits, but it’s the latter that gets us the most excited. Once the overall weight falls into the 16-17kg range (the lightest bikes are currently19-20kg) it’s going to be really hard to tell the difference between an e-bike and a regular trail bike on the descents and the flat, but you get the benefit of a gentle push up the climbs.
I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.

Chip them, & your asking for a world of potential legal trouble if your evolved in an accident & giving fuel to those ppl frothing at the mouth for (all) MTB’s to be banned from share trails. That said if it’s chipped it shouldn’t be on legal MTB trails, as there classed as basically motorbikes (very simple overview), so suggesting you only use the ‘dongle’ off-road argument falls flat on its face
My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding. 

With 170mm travel, aggressive angles and Shimano’s superbly calibrated STEPS motor, the Focus Sam2 is an enduro bike with a built-in shuttle. With the bolt on TEC pack you really can climb to new heights, but without it the smaller capacity internal battery means you need to be ultra economical with your energy use. It’s also frustrating that the internal battery can’t be removed easily for charging. By far the biggest frustration with the Jam2 though is that the sizing isn’t very generous and standover clearance is limited. It’s still a great e-bike, but when you’re spending this much money, you can afford to be fussy.
Meeting at University whilst studying Electronic and Electrical Engineering, we realised that we were both active individuals with a shared interest in outdoor sports and anything with two wheels. Combining our engineering knowledge and our years of experience with skateboards, scooters, bikes and more, we feel that we’re in a great position to test and understand these products and provide you with an unbiased, accurate source of information.  

With 170mm travel, aggressive angles and Shimano’s superbly calibrated STEPS motor, the Focus Sam2 is an enduro bike with a built-in shuttle. With the bolt on TEC pack you really can climb to new heights, but without it the smaller capacity internal battery means you need to be ultra economical with your energy use. It’s also frustrating that the internal battery can’t be removed easily for charging. By far the biggest frustration with the Jam2 though is that the sizing isn’t very generous and standover clearance is limited. It’s still a great e-bike, but when you’re spending this much money, you can afford to be fussy. 

E-bike & Assisted bicycle & Normal bike. With the LED 3-speed smart meter button, you can choose the electric assist power according to your needs. You can add a burst of speed with the throttle, which is ideal for pulling away from traffic lights. Combining three modes would be a better choice. ANCHEER Power Plus Electric Mountain Bike is the best option to improve your riding bike experience.
My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.
Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).
Yep, there’s no getting away from the fact that i’m peddling a 21kg bike when the assist is switched off but with the massive battery & range there is no real need to switch it off, I can barely turn the pedals on a normal bike when i hit a hill so if i’m on the road and wanting as much range as possible to explore a few of the surrounding trails in my area of Galloway i’m quite happy using the eco mode to get myself around, the tour mode gives a bit more assist and is enough to tackle the majority of single track climbs with effort from myself, the sport mode is enough for all but the steepest of singletrack use and the turbo mode is just batshit mental for all out super steep climbs and so much fun.
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