Big Bird, you make some great points. One. Where is the line drawn between electric bike and motorcycle. Two. It would allow those who might not be able to enjoy the outdoors mobility. In my opinion I feel electric bikes lean more to the motorcycle side of things. Don't get me wrong, I ride and share certain trails with motos, however not all trails are open to them. Here is where I see the potential for conflict among other user groups with electric bikes. That being said your idea for stickers for the disabled seems to make sense. So now the question is, electric bike or electric motorcycle? How is it defined?
It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
This Foldable bike has super cool style, so you'll feel proud displaying it around town. Some assembly is required. The ANCHEER 26inch 36V Foldable Bike can Speed up to 25km/h,High speed brushless shock.This folding bike is easy to transport, saving space in the reserve compartment.The mountain bike is Shimano 7th gear transmission Disc Suspension Fork.
The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.
Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.
What i’d really like is the ability to custom tune the standard speed settings with regard to the torque curve/output and perhaps have a top speed of 18mph or thereabouts, back when i could ride a normal bike under my own steam there were some sections of my local trails where i could easily maintain 20mph+ through the single track (allowing for acceleration out of the corners) as it was on a slight fall line. It’s all brain-farts at the moment so the tuning kit is still in my toolbox and it may stay in there.
The Ancheer is powered by a 36V 8Ah battery system that is mounted on the front of the handlebars. This powers a 250 W brushless motor. How much power you want the bike to exert is dependant on which mode you set it to. It has 2 modes: assistive and e-bike. E-bike will power the entire thing for you so you don’t have to pedal at all, whereas assistive will give you a bit of power to help you out. This is all controlled by a small panel on the handlebars. The assistive mode has 3 settings so you can have as much control over the amount of work you do as you desire.

Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.


With most ebikes the choice of motor defines aspects of the frame geometry and to a lesser degree the suspension characteristics of the bike. Not with new Rock Mountain Altitude Powerplay. With its bespoke motor Rocky has been able to design an ebike that reflects the ride quality of a highly evolved 150mm trail bike. With instant power pickup, extended battery life and streamline proportions it’s not just the handling of the Rocky that will get you charged up for riding. It’s the best bike in this test by some margin, but we had an issue with the motor momentarily cutting and raising questions over it’s reliability.
Amazing bike, quick. On the flat average 21mph full power, after 3-4 miles average 18mph. A lot of hills in SoCal so this 1/3 hp motor does it’s job well with pedal assist on very steep grades. With electric only mode and heavy, steep, long hills this bike does its job pushing through a 16 mile commute with some energy to spare with a 190lb load of me and my gear. This bike could do much more with flat and pedal assist modes maybe twice as far. Recommend you use smaller tires 1.75 vs the standard 1.95 to achieve my results. Continental contact travels work great!
Ancheer specialise in a range of electrical and non electrical products, from simple trampolines to some high tech electric mountain bikes. All their products follow a theme of being reasonably well made and being on the lower end of the price range. Today we’ll look at and review the Ancheer Folding Electric Mountain bike. We’ve gathered all the information you need to help you decide whether it’s the right e-bike for you.

Having a motor bolted to the bottom of a mountain bike that provides pedal assistance is an amazing leveller. The constant torque it applies to the chain rounds out the squarest of pedalling actions, which in turn helps stabilizes the rear suspension and counter pedal induced bob, seamlessly shifting your focus from pedalling efficiency to battery life.
When it comes to the distance it can cover at a single charge, it really depends. For instance, if you live 13 miles from work and ride on a smooth, flat pavement, the bike has enough power to get you home. The battery level does decrease when the motor is under increased stress—like when you’re riding up a hilly terrain—but it quickly levels itself when you go back riding on a flat road surface.
Mountain biking is all about having fun, right? About getting out there, enjoying the great outdoors, exercising your body and freeing your mind. So what if we told you there was a type of bike that lets you ride further, faster, and have even more fun? One that even made you LOL on the climbs? You’d still have to work for your rewards, but by assisting your efforts, it allowed you to wring every little drop of enjoyment out of your rides. 

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