I tested the Sduro 8.0 towards the end of last year (there's a new range out for 2018) and was surprised by its nimbleness. You expect e-bikes to be less maneuverable than their acoustic predecessors, but, pelting down some bespoke forest paths near Pedal & Spoke in the Surrey hills, I found I completely forgot that there was a box of electronic EPO on my frame. Partly, that's because the battery is cleverly integrated into the frame to decrease drag; mostly, it's because the suspension is soft and the steering nimble, much like a normal mountain bike.
Another reason I chose the Lacuba Evo E8 is because of its overall geometry. First, check out the upright position you’ll be riding in. This positioning is ideal for bike touring because you’ll be traveling long distances. You’ll be much more comfortable in this position than you probably would be hunched over a road or hybrid bike. I also love how the Brose battery integrates completely into the downtube. Not only does this hide the fact that you’re getting a little extra help (if you’re self-conscious about that), but it also leaves you space to mount water bottle cages, a frame pump, or even a frame-mounted bag. These are sometimes crucial items during a bicycle tour, and many electric bikes cannot accommodate these due to the protrusion caused by a battery.
E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque and others are quieter. But generally all four make good options. Look for motor output (in watts) which will give you an idea of total power. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a better figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a truer reflection of power.
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