The Ancheer folding electric mountain bike does have a few weird quirks. The first is the handlebar mounted battery. It saves space for the folding mechanism, but looks odd. Fortunately it has very little effect on handling because it is mounted so close the head tube’s pivot point. It does raise the center of gravity of the bike a bit, but the difference is small compared to how much you raise the bike’s center of gravity.
What i’d really like is the ability to custom tune the standard speed settings with regard to the torque curve/output and perhaps have a top speed of 18mph or thereabouts, back when i could ride a normal bike under my own steam there were some sections of my local trails where i could easily maintain 20mph+ through the single track (allowing for acceleration out of the corners) as it was on a slight fall line. It’s all brain-farts at the moment so the tuning kit is still in my toolbox and it may stay in there.
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.
With 170mm travel, aggressive angles and Shimano’s superbly calibrated STEPS motor, the Focus Sam2 is an enduro bike with a built-in shuttle. With the bolt on TEC pack you really can climb to new heights, but without it the smaller capacity internal battery means you need to be ultra economical with your energy use. It’s also frustrating that the internal battery can’t be removed easily for charging. By far the biggest frustration with the Jam2 though is that the sizing isn’t very generous and standover clearance is limited. It’s still a great e-bike, but when you’re spending this much money, you can afford to be fussy.
Why We Like It: This is the best electric folding bike for 2019. It has great features along with portability. The ANCHEER Folding Electric Bike is the bike that we tested. We love that the bikes battery can be removed. It performs great, has a comfortable speed, decent range and is light and durable. The only minor issues we had are that the headlight is made cheaply and for the speed/range we felt that it should charge just a bit faster.
The extra grip a 50lb e-bike normally helps to prevent overshooting corners when on the brakes, and bring pure DH-bike-like fun factor on the steepest trails. This electric Orange, however, rides more like a ‘standard’ enduro bike with a motor, which could be good or bad, depending on your expectations and riding style. It’s built tough and delivers stacks of fun in less time than any regular bike can. Adding a motor hasn’t upset Orange’s superb geometry.
The build quality, however, is generally fantastic. It feels sturdy and strong, the clip to hold the fold in place never feels like it’s coming loose and the wheels feel like they can conquer anything. Also the suspension system is quite impressive and isn’t even included on the non-folding Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike. This suspension system and the strong frame help give the Ancheer the ability to comfortably hold riders who weigh up to 150kg (330 lbs).
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