After losing my licence due to poor decisions, I decided that I was going to have to get a mountain bike. After weeks of research and checking state laws, I decided to buy this Ancheer bike. After all, I would be paying the same amount for a decent mountain without a motor. And I must say that I dont regret my purchase. When I got it out of the box and put it together, I was surprised at the quality. Then I took it to the gas station and filled the tires with air and got on and pulled back the throttle. I couldnt stop smiling and laughing . The power was not what i expected. I weigh 235 and it pulled me rather quickly. So me being me, I had to test this thing out to see what it got. That first week iI bet I did at least 150 mi untill I got a flat back tire. I discovered that can go almost 20 mi on a charge in pedal assist mode. And there were some pretty steep hills on some of my treks. Thats the beauty of this bike, you can go full speed on flat to semi hilly roads. And then when you hit those steep hills you have plenty of energy to tackle them,and the pedal assist helps all along the way. For me its the perfect marriage of exercise and being able to go where i want to go without being exhausted. Since then I added a cargo rack and bag, lights for night riding and speedometer. I would definitely recommend buying this bike just because its fun.
The extra grip a 50lb e-bike normally helps to prevent overshooting corners when on the brakes, and bring pure DH-bike-like fun factor on the steepest trails. This electric Orange, however, rides more like a ‘standard’ enduro bike with a motor, which could be good or bad, depending on your expectations and riding style. It’s built tough and delivers stacks of fun in less time than any regular bike can. Adding a motor hasn’t upset Orange’s superb geometry.
Having a motor bolted to the bottom of a mountain bike that provides pedal assistance is an amazing leveller. The constant torque it applies to the chain rounds out the squarest of pedalling actions, which in turn helps stabilizes the rear suspension and counter pedal induced bob, seamlessly shifting your focus from pedalling efficiency to battery life.
Last year, the Trek Powerfly 9 LT was one of the only ebikes with geometry and handling that came close to a modern enduro bike. For 2018, Trek has built on that winning formula with new frame. It’s lowered the battery in the downtube, while adding a stiffer Fox 36 fork, more powerful SRAM RE brakes and a stronger Bontrager wheelset. All welcome improvements to a really capable bike. The price has also crept up to reflect the changes. The biggest transformation however, is that Rocky Mountain has raised the ebike bar to a new high with the Altitude Powerplay.
The bike comes partly disassembled for shipping, so you'll have to attach the handlebars, pedals, front light, quick-release saddle and front wheel. In all, it'll take you around 30 minutes including removing all the cable ties and packaging. The tools to do this are included, but you might prefer you use your own screwdriver and spanners as the supplied tools are poor quality.
It's a basically a complete redesign so this is a 29er it's got a 500 watt hour internal battery it's based on the Shimano platform the really good Shimano motor the 8,000 motor which is not brand new but it's been out and it's tried and tested a lot of manufacturers are using that one what comments are saying is that they've been able to distribute the weight over a wider portion of the frame they've kept the center of gravity low they use in a long shock with a really large stroke so they can vary the progressiveness of the suspension and they're saying the bike feels dynamic easy to move it's got a really good feeling and really great suspension platform
Amazing bike, quick. On the flat average 21mph full power, after 3-4 miles average 18mph. A lot of hills in SoCal so this 1/3 hp motor does it’s job well with pedal assist on very steep grades. With electric only mode and heavy, steep, long hills this bike does its job pushing through a 16 mile commute with some energy to spare with a 190lb load of me and my gear. This bike could do much more with flat and pedal assist modes maybe twice as far. Recommend you use smaller tires 1.75 vs the standard 1.95 to achieve my results. Continental contact travels work great!
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
I continued to have issues with the rear brakes. The rear disc brake was bending when I braked and I could not figure out how to get it from rubbing on the pads. I eventually took the bike over to REI and paid for a tune-up. Fantastic work by them, the bike has a better top speed by a couple mph now and shifting/braking are much smoother. I was also having issues with the chain jumping off the front derailleur on high torque (high gear from standstill). Looks like I just needed the experts to give it the tune.
For every post we write we have done hours of research and have had as much hands on experience with the product as possible. Our aim is to get a complete understanding of the item(s) we’re testing, but if we have any doubts or queries we have no hesitation in going straight to the manufacturer for information that might not be readily available to you, the customer.
My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.
Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.
It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position.
Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).
I was up at Aviemore last September and borrowed the Scott E-Spark from Bothy Bikes and within an hr i returned to the shop with a stupid goofy grin on my face and ordered the Scott E-Genuis 710+, i had to wait 4 months till they were released but David got me one of the first to arrive and i drove up to collect it the following week, i’ve not regretted buying it for one second 😀 .
So whether you want to achieve physical fitness or just want to avoid daily traffic to work or school, the Ancheer Power Plus has got you covered. But of course, if you want to achieve maximum benefit out it as a workout tool, you will have to do more of the peddling than cruising. It also offers a convenient alternative when you want to hit the rough terrain or long distances where peddling all the way is not an option.

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