My wife has a Scott, essentially a Contessa with a Bosch crank motor. Very heavy thing, bloody hard work with no assistance, but even with assist on progress surely depends on your effort. We don’t do a lot of trail centres, but it’s been fine round Rothie, up to Einich, in Inshriach and up the Corbett behind Kingussie, as well as onroad. Lets us ride together, which would be harder without assist, and is heling her recover from skiing injuries.
As I said before, going up hills might require some pedaling, but it is SO MUCH EASIER with the motor running. I feel like a higher voltage is used on level 3 pedal assist than can be gotten just using the hand turn, though. It takes a few pedals for the pedal assist to kick in which can be annoying, but it does save some battery on initial acceleration. You also have to be careful pedaling around to park the bike or at a street corner waiting for traffic because you DO NOT want the motor to kick in and send you into a workbench or worse ... oncoming traffic.

I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.


I was up at Aviemore last September and borrowed the Scott E-Spark from Bothy Bikes and within an hr i returned to the shop with a stupid goofy grin on my face and ordered the Scott E-Genuis 710+, i had to wait 4 months till they were released but David got me one of the first to arrive and i drove up to collect it the following week, i’ve not regretted buying it for one second 😀 .
My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.
I have done a video check that out if you want more details on the new bosch system but these use the 625 watt hour Bosch into battery so you get around 25% extra on top of the 500 watt hour batteries in terms of range or battery life and personally to me that makes quite a big difference because if you're out for all-day adventures.
Last year, the Trek Powerfly 9 LT was one of the only ebikes with geometry and handling that came close to a modern enduro bike. For 2018, Trek has built on that winning formula with new frame. It’s lowered the battery in the downtube, while adding a stiffer Fox 36 fork, more powerful SRAM RE brakes and a stronger Bontrager wheelset. All welcome improvements to a really capable bike. The price has also crept up to reflect the changes. The biggest transformation however, is that Rocky Mountain has raised the ebike bar to a new high with the Altitude Powerplay.
My wife has a Scott, essentially a Contessa with a Bosch crank motor. Very heavy thing, bloody hard work with no assistance, but even with assist on progress surely depends on your effort. We don’t do a lot of trail centres, but it’s been fine round Rothie, up to Einich, in Inshriach and up the Corbett behind Kingussie, as well as onroad. Lets us ride together, which would be harder without assist, and is heling her recover from skiing injuries.
As I said before, going up hills might require some pedaling, but it is SO MUCH EASIER with the motor running. I feel like a higher voltage is used on level 3 pedal assist than can be gotten just using the hand turn, though. It takes a few pedals for the pedal assist to kick in which can be annoying, but it does save some battery on initial acceleration. You also have to be careful pedaling around to park the bike or at a street corner waiting for traffic because you DO NOT want the motor to kick in and send you into a workbench or worse ... oncoming traffic.
So it’s time to get yourself one of those fancy new electric bikes that are passing you by. You came to the right place. Whether you want a reliable electric bike to commute to work, an electric mountain bike for adventure, or a fat tire bike for trips to grandma’s house, our Best Electric Bikes For 2019 buyer’s guide will keep you in the right lane.
This Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike is absolutely great. I will gladly give it a 10 star if possible. However, one piece of advice for any intending buyer; make sure you dry the battery terminals after washing your bike. The bike will not power up once there is moisture at those interface.I have experienced this a few times over the last two months I've had my e-bike. It is annoying when you only find out, at the time you are rushing off to work.

So it’s time to get yourself one of those fancy new electric bikes that are passing you by. You came to the right place. Whether you want a reliable electric bike to commute to work, an electric mountain bike for adventure, or a fat tire bike for trips to grandma’s house, our Best Electric Bikes For 2019 buyer’s guide will keep you in the right lane.
The Ancheer is powered by a 36V 8Ah battery system that is mounted on the front of the handlebars. This powers a 250 W brushless motor. How much power you want the bike to exert is dependant on which mode you set it to. It has 2 modes: assistive and e-bike. E-bike will power the entire thing for you so you don’t have to pedal at all, whereas assistive will give you a bit of power to help you out. This is all controlled by a small panel on the handlebars. The assistive mode has 3 settings so you can have as much control over the amount of work you do as you desire.

If you're looking to explore some new trails, expand your weekly ride routes, and have some fun doing it, the ancheer electric mountain bicycle has the perfect blend of trail performance and power to give you the ride of your life. The frame was constructed from Aviation Grade Aluminum Alloy, which is equal parts, strong, lightweight, and incredibly responsive. The design of the frame is designed according to the human body mechanics. Together with the dual disc brakes and high strength steel fork, you will enjoy a comfortable riding experience.

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