Meeting at University whilst studying Electronic and Electrical Engineering, we realised that we were both active individuals with a shared interest in outdoor sports and anything with two wheels. Combining our engineering knowledge and our years of experience with skateboards, scooters, bikes and more, we feel that we’re in a great position to test and understand these products and provide you with an unbiased, accurate source of information. 
Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one. 


For every post we write we have done hours of research and have had as much hands on experience with the product as possible. Our aim is to get a complete understanding of the item(s) we’re testing, but if we have any doubts or queries we have no hesitation in going straight to the manufacturer for information that might not be readily available to you, the customer.
It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
Rented a pretty decent Scott. Did some nice mixed terrain but only for a day. Firstly it was great fun. Hard to get away from that. The pedalling felt good. It was like everything was a slight downhill. You can pootle or give it a few hard pedals and fly along at any time. On the flat, uphill, on bumpy grass, all felt like downs once you pedaled a lttle. Good connection between the pedalling and the movement. Smooth delivery. It just took the terrain and slope out of the equation. Could’ve easily got away with less power. It would be an expensive buy. This one was 3.5k but kitted out like a £500 halfords special. Once the price comes down they will be everywhere.

Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.


My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.
The fit is a little rough for me. I'm tall, about 73 inches, and I feel like the bike is small. I've ridden a few dozen miles to include a trip with a kids trailer towed behind, and it hasn't been really uncomfortable, but a little cramped compared to my Schwinn Trailway 28"/700c hybrid bike. Seat adjusts up but feels tilted back a little more than I would like. I have ridden in shorts and tshirt to the beach as well as khakis and a button up with backpack to work, ok comfort both ways. Perhaps it will just take some time to get used to.

With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs.


We think that the Ancheer Folding Electric Mountain Bike looks (mostly) great. The frame is finished very well and the wheel are striking. The only complaint we have with the looks and the overall design is how they decided to implement the battery pack. The little pouch at the front looks out of place and can feel a bit cumbersome. We would have liked if they could have potentially attached it, or better yet integrated it into the horizontal part of the main frame. I understand the difficulties of doing this as the bike has the folding mechanism but it would have been nice if they’d have managed it. 

Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.

If you're looking to explore some new trails, expand your weekly ride routes, and have some fun doing it, the ancheer electric mountain bicycle has the perfect blend of trail performance and power to give you the ride of your life. The frame was constructed from Aviation Grade Aluminum Alloy, which is equal parts, strong, lightweight, and incredibly responsive. The design of the frame is designed according to the human body mechanics. Together with the dual disc brakes and high strength steel fork, you will enjoy a comfortable riding experience.
Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.

A couple of weeks in, I had a wreck (brakes were mounted reverse of what I'm used to; front wheel locked up during a turn). The half-throttle/light/horn assembly was damaged beyond repair. Emailed the official company account and the supposed owners' account several times; no response. I had to buy a near-identical part from a Chinese company and re-wire it myself.
With 170mm travel, aggressive angles and Shimano’s superbly calibrated STEPS motor, the Focus Sam2 is an enduro bike with a built-in shuttle. With the bolt on TEC pack you really can climb to new heights, but without it the smaller capacity internal battery means you need to be ultra economical with your energy use. It’s also frustrating that the internal battery can’t be removed easily for charging. By far the biggest frustration with the Jam2 though is that the sizing isn’t very generous and standover clearance is limited. It’s still a great e-bike, but when you’re spending this much money, you can afford to be fussy.
I should have bought one a few years ago but i dithered as i placed my faith in the Spinal team to repair me, or at least offer a solution that i could work with to enable me to continue riding off-road but i finally had to face the fact that i will never be able to ride like i used to on my Soulcraft SS, no more lapping Kirroughtree or climbing Heatrbreak Hill over n’ over just because i could which if i’m honest with myself was partly why i refused to entertain the idea of an electric assist bike – i kinda took the huff n’ sat in the corner with a petted lip due to my lack of leg muscle strength – I refused to admit i needed any help.

Weight isn’t anything like a critical as one would assume. Weight distribution however is a different matter and this is where geometry, specifically the ratio of the front centre measurement to the chain stay length really comes into play. Battery placement is important too, and smaller batteries give an edge in the handling stakes while robbing the bike of range.


Tyres: Chayoyang 26in tyres Handlebars: Aluminum Alloy Lithium battery: 36V Charging time: 4-6 hours Motor: 250W high speed brushless gear motors Saddle tube: Aluminum Alloy seat tube Meter: 3-speed smart meter button Pedal: Aluminum Alloy Pedal Headlight: Bright LED headlamp and horn Front and rear wheels: Double layer Aluminum Alloy wheel (Rainbox DX-3000) Wheel Diameter: 26 inch Seat Height: 30.4-39 inch Handlebars length: 26.7 inch Vehicle weight: 20kg Battery weight: 2.2kg Mileage: 15-30 miles Load capacity: 150kg (over 120kg not recommended) Maximum speed of motor: 15.5mph
Why We Like It: This is the best electric folding bike for 2019. It has great features along with portability. The ANCHEER Folding Electric Bike is the bike that we tested. We love that the bikes battery can be removed. It performs great, has a comfortable speed, decent range and is light and durable. The only minor issues we had are that the headlight is made cheaply and for the speed/range we felt that it should charge just a bit faster.
I haven't quite figured the brakes out yet. The back brake has a lot of rubbing on one brake pad (outboard). I've gone through YouTube and have done everything short of taking the brake pads out and adjusting the springs. Not sure what I'm going to do about it yet. Disk brakes work great though. I do have some annoying squealing but it is probably on me for not having it adjusted right. 

“The Ancheer Power Plus is a really nice e-bike.  It rides well and has lots of goodies including LED lights and a nice electric horn.  I like that it is pedal assist – all you have to do is set it to how much pedal assist you want and it does the rest without having to turn the throttle.  The only thing I found and maybe I’m missing something is that when the bike is folded there doesn’t appear to be a clasp which makes it difficult to carry.” 

Why We Like It: This is a very capable mountain bike that just about anyone can ride and enjoy. It has great suspension, a smooth ride, and amazing tires that grip everything. The charge time and the battery’s odd position on the frame are our only gripes, but those things aside, you can’t argue with the power and quality of this fat electric bike. It makes a heck of a beach cruiser. You’ll love everything from the front hub to the back hub.
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