Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.

The Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike comes partly disassembled for shipping, so you'll have to attach the handlebars, pedals, front light, quick-release saddle and front wheel. In all, it'll take you around 30 minutes including removing all the cable ties and packaging. The tools to do this are included, but you might prefer you use your own screwdriver and spanners as the supplied tools are poor quality.


I’m sat here absolutely knackered after being out this morning for a 3hr session round my local trails, including some much needed trail work which is quite amusing as i tend to stumble and fall on my arse quite a lot but over the past month i have managed to clear pretty much all of my old trails with the aid of a flask of tea, quality tunes on my jambox speaker along with my rake, mini shovel and Silky Zubat saw – I’ve managed to regain that totally exhausted feeling you get at the end of a days riding n” trail grooming so i’m a very happy bunny indeed! – albeit sitting here with aches n’ pains that make me wince if i reach for anything but i wouldn’t have it any other way.
Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).

“The Ancheer Power Plus is a really nice e-bike.  It rides well and has lots of goodies including LED lights and a nice electric horn.  I like that it is pedal assist – all you have to do is set it to how much pedal assist you want and it does the rest without having to turn the throttle.  The only thing I found and maybe I’m missing something is that when the bike is folded there doesn’t appear to be a clasp which makes it difficult to carry.”
So it’s time to get yourself one of those fancy new electric bikes that are passing you by. You came to the right place. Whether you want a reliable electric bike to commute to work, an electric mountain bike for adventure, or a fat tire bike for trips to grandma’s house, our Best Electric Bikes For 2019 buyer’s guide will keep you in the right lane.
With most ebikes the choice of motor defines aspects of the frame geometry and to a lesser degree the suspension characteristics of the bike. Not with new Rock Mountain Altitude Powerplay. With its bespoke motor Rocky has been able to design an ebike that reflects the ride quality of a highly evolved 150mm trail bike. With instant power pickup, extended battery life and streamline proportions it’s not just the handling of the Rocky that will get you charged up for riding. It’s the best bike in this test by some margin, but we had an issue with the motor momentarily cutting and raising questions over it’s reliability.
Weight isn’t anything like a critical as one would assume. Weight distribution however is a different matter and this is where geometry, specifically the ratio of the front centre measurement to the chain stay length really comes into play. Battery placement is important too, and smaller batteries give an edge in the handling stakes while robbing the bike of range.
Big Bird, you make some great points. One. Where is the line drawn between electric bike and motorcycle. Two. It would allow those who might not be able to enjoy the outdoors mobility. In my opinion I feel electric bikes lean more to the motorcycle side of things. Don't get me wrong, I ride and share certain trails with motos, however not all trails are open to them. Here is where I see the potential for conflict among other user groups with electric bikes. That being said your idea for stickers for the disabled seems to make sense. So now the question is, electric bike or electric motorcycle? How is it defined?
With 170mm travel, aggressive angles and Shimano’s superbly calibrated STEPS motor, the Focus Sam2 is an enduro bike with a built-in shuttle. With the bolt on TEC pack you really can climb to new heights, but without it the smaller capacity internal battery means you need to be ultra economical with your energy use. It’s also frustrating that the internal battery can’t be removed easily for charging. By far the biggest frustration with the Jam2 though is that the sizing isn’t very generous and standover clearance is limited. It’s still a great e-bike, but when you’re spending this much money, you can afford to be fussy.
Meeting at University whilst studying Electronic and Electrical Engineering, we realised that we were both active individuals with a shared interest in outdoor sports and anything with two wheels. Combining our engineering knowledge and our years of experience with skateboards, scooters, bikes and more, we feel that we’re in a great position to test and understand these products and provide you with an unbiased, accurate source of information. 

Ancheer specialise in a range of electrical and non electrical products, from simple trampolines to some high tech electric mountain bikes. All their products follow a theme of being reasonably well made and being on the lower end of the price range. Today we’ll look at and review the Ancheer Folding Electric Mountain bike. We’ve gathered all the information you need to help you decide whether it’s the right e-bike for you.

I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.


A couple of weeks in, I had a wreck (brakes were mounted reverse of what I'm used to; front wheel locked up during a turn). The half-throttle/light/horn assembly was damaged beyond repair. Emailed the official company account and the supposed owners' account several times; no response. I had to buy a near-identical part from a Chinese company and re-wire it myself.
Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.
Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike - Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.

The fit is a little rough for me. I'm tall, about 73 inches, and I feel like the bike is small. I've ridden a few dozen miles to include a trip with a kids trailer towed behind, and it hasn't been really uncomfortable, but a little cramped compared to my Schwinn Trailway 28"/700c hybrid bike. Seat adjusts up but feels tilted back a little more than I would like. I have ridden in shorts and tshirt to the beach as well as khakis and a button up with backpack to work, ok comfort both ways. Perhaps it will just take some time to get used to.

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