The Hover-1 is a lightweight, portable folding electric scooter meant to add a little bit of fun in your daily transportation. Read our Hover-1 Folding Electric Scooter Review and see if this fun little commuter is for you.A quick glance may trick you into thinking this is a toy for kids, but it’s not. The scooter is designed for use by adults for ...
Had my ebike for nearly 2 months now and covered 500 miles. A lovely bike to ride, and not had a single problem until now. Overall I love this bike and find pleasure in riding it. Get your cadence right and its a great ride. The more effort you put in, the more the battery will help you, everything seems easier on this ebike compared to my old normal bike.
For every post we write we have done hours of research and have had as much hands on experience with the product as possible. Our aim is to get a complete understanding of the item(s) we’re testing, but if we have any doubts or queries we have no hesitation in going straight to the manufacturer for information that might not be readily available to you, the customer.

Having a motor bolted to the bottom of a mountain bike that provides pedal assistance is an amazing leveller. The constant torque it applies to the chain rounds out the squarest of pedalling actions, which in turn helps stabilizes the rear suspension and counter pedal induced bob, seamlessly shifting your focus from pedalling efficiency to battery life.

Tyres: Chayoyang 26in tyres Handlebars: Aluminum Alloy Lithium battery: 36V Charging time: 4-6 hours Motor: 250W high speed brushless gear motors Saddle tube: Aluminum Alloy seat tube Meter: 3-speed smart meter button Pedal: Aluminum Alloy Pedal Headlight: Bright LED headlamp and horn Front and rear wheels: Double layer Aluminum Alloy wheel (Rainbox DX-3000) Wheel Diameter: 26 inch Seat Height: 30.4-39 inch Handlebars length: 26.7 inch Vehicle weight: 20kg Battery weight: 2.2kg Mileage: 15-30 miles Load capacity: 150kg (over 120kg not recommended) Maximum speed of motor: 15.5mph
Weight isn’t anything like a critical as one would assume. Weight distribution however is a different matter and this is where geometry, specifically the ratio of the front centre measurement to the chain stay length really comes into play. Battery placement is important too, and smaller batteries give an edge in the handling stakes while robbing the bike of range.
As I said before, going up hills might require some pedaling, but it is SO MUCH EASIER with the motor running. I feel like a higher voltage is used on level 3 pedal assist than can be gotten just using the hand turn, though. It takes a few pedals for the pedal assist to kick in which can be annoying, but it does save some battery on initial acceleration. You also have to be careful pedaling around to park the bike or at a street corner waiting for traffic because you DO NOT want the motor to kick in and send you into a workbench or worse ... oncoming traffic.
Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.
Why We Like It: Razor is a name to be reckoned with in the industry, and the Razor EcoSmart Metro is highly rated online, like a lot of their products. This model gets a spot on our rankings thanks to its great build quality and nice top speed. It doesn’t hurt that it’s affordable and from a trusted brand as well. It has a max speed of 18 miles per hour, a powerful 500 W motor and it delivers 40 minutes of continuous use.
For Canyon’s first e-mtb the Spectal:ON 8.0 hasn’t simply hit the trail running, it’s power up it in Boost mode. The geometry, sizing and handling are all on point, and details like the adjustable geometry, odd wheel sizes, tyre specific rim widths and short cranks make Canyon a market leader rather than a brand that’s simply playing catch up. With a Fox 36 Fit4 fork the Spectral:ON 8.0 would probably have won the test, the more basic Grip damper never having the measure of Canyon’s superb rear suspension.
I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.
We think that the Ancheer Folding Electric Mountain Bike looks (mostly) great. The frame is finished very well and the wheel are striking. The only complaint we have with the looks and the overall design is how they decided to implement the battery pack. The little pouch at the front looks out of place and can feel a bit cumbersome. We would have liked if they could have potentially attached it, or better yet integrated it into the horizontal part of the main frame. I understand the difficulties of doing this as the bike has the folding mechanism but it would have been nice if they’d have managed it.


My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.


Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).
Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.
Having a motor bolted to the bottom of a mountain bike that provides pedal assistance is an amazing leveller. The constant torque it applies to the chain rounds out the squarest of pedalling actions, which in turn helps stabilizes the rear suspension and counter pedal induced bob, seamlessly shifting your focus from pedalling efficiency to battery life.
Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.
What i’d really like is the ability to custom tune the standard speed settings with regard to the torque curve/output and perhaps have a top speed of 18mph or thereabouts, back when i could ride a normal bike under my own steam there were some sections of my local trails where i could easily maintain 20mph+ through the single track (allowing for acceleration out of the corners) as it was on a slight fall line. It’s all brain-farts at the moment so the tuning kit is still in my toolbox and it may stay in there.
Not sure if there’s any in Southampton but there’s a couple of specialist electric bike shops in the Brighton area that sell them and they seem happy to let people do test rides. Probably the best way to decide if they’re the right thing for you and what you want to do. Would happily accompany you for a ride round Stanmer if you came over this way for a test.
Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike SERVICE AVAILABLE --- With one-year warranty for the electric motor, battery and other parts except for frame, no worry about using it. This bicycle arrives 85% assembled. It's not hard to finish aseembly by yourself. The assembly service on this page is provided and charged by Amazon’s third-party company, if you can't finish by yourself, click on the “Select Assembly ” button above; choose "Ship to store for assembly and pick up".
E-enduro bikes aren’t as different to regular bikes as one might imagine. All of the fundamentals are the same and by nailing the geometry and sizing Vitus has produced an amazing e-bike with the E-Sommet VR.Sure there are a couple of little things we’d probably change, like the STEPS Di2 mode shifter and rear tyre, but that’s about it. And given how much cheaper the Vitus is compared to the competition, you can easily afford to make these changes and even buy a spare battery. The E-Sommet VR is no golf buggy, but Vitus has it’s certainly hit a hole in one with this bike. 

It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
Overall, you’re not going to get a foldable electric mountain bike that’s better than this at the price that Ancheer are selling it for. It’s well built and designed, it’s easy to use and put together and it makes mountain biking so much more fun whilst opening it up to more people. If you’re looking for a versatile e-bike that is just at home on the mountain as it is on the morning commute, all for waaay less than $1000 then this might just be the bike for you.
The Hover-1 is a lightweight, portable folding electric scooter meant to add a little bit of fun in your daily transportation. Read our Hover-1 Folding Electric Scooter Review and see if this fun little commuter is for you.A quick glance may trick you into thinking this is a toy for kids, but it’s not. The scooter is designed for use by adults for ...
I haven't quite figured the brakes out yet. The back brake has a lot of rubbing on one brake pad (outboard). I've gone through YouTube and have done everything short of taking the brake pads out and adjusting the springs. Not sure what I'm going to do about it yet. Disk brakes work great though. I do have some annoying squealing but it is probably on me for not having it adjusted right.

Weight isn’t anything like a critical as one would assume. Weight distribution however is a different matter and this is where geometry, specifically the ratio of the front centre measurement to the chain stay length really comes into play. Battery placement is important too, and smaller batteries give an edge in the handling stakes while robbing the bike of range.
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.

Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).
Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position.
As I said before, going up hills might require some pedaling, but it is SO MUCH EASIER with the motor running. I feel like a higher voltage is used on level 3 pedal assist than can be gotten just using the hand turn, though. It takes a few pedals for the pedal assist to kick in which can be annoying, but it does save some battery on initial acceleration. You also have to be careful pedaling around to park the bike or at a street corner waiting for traffic because you DO NOT want the motor to kick in and send you into a workbench or worse ... oncoming traffic.
It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
This Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike is absolutely great. I will gladly give it a 10 star if possible. However, one piece of advice for any intending buyer; make sure you dry the battery terminals after washing your bike. The bike will not power up once there is moisture at those interface.I have experienced this a few times over the last two months I've had my e-bike. It is annoying when you only find out, at the time you are rushing off to work.

We may receive a small fee if you purchase any items through our product links. This in no way affects the price you pay, the price remains the same whether you order through our links or direct (though prices can go up or down without notice). Any fees we earn enable us to continue to spend our time researching, reviewing, writing and generally keeping this site up-to-date for the benefit of readers like you. Thank you.
If you really want to see the future take a look at the Fazua Evation, with a battery and motor this system weighs an incredible 4.7kg! The battery only has 250wh, but at 1.3kg you could easily carry a spare in a pack. The really interesting thing about this system though, is the motor and the battery can be removed from the frame, so you really do have two bikes in one.
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
I haven't quite figured the brakes out yet. The back brake has a lot of rubbing on one brake pad (outboard). I've gone through YouTube and have done everything short of taking the brake pads out and adjusting the springs. Not sure what I'm going to do about it yet. Disk brakes work great though. I do have some annoying squealing but it is probably on me for not having it adjusted right.
The extra grip a 50lb e-bike normally helps to prevent overshooting corners when on the brakes, and bring pure DH-bike-like fun factor on the steepest trails. This electric Orange, however, rides more like a ‘standard’ enduro bike with a motor, which could be good or bad, depending on your expectations and riding style. It’s built tough and delivers stacks of fun in less time than any regular bike can. Adding a motor hasn’t upset Orange’s superb geometry.
Disclaimer: By bidding on any item, you expressly agree that use of the website and the services is at your sole risk and subject to the user agreement. The website, the services and any goods or services purchased or obtained through the website, the services or any transactions entered into through the website or services are provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis. PropertyRoom disclaims, on its own behalf and, when acting as an agent, on behalf of its principal, all warranties of any kind, whether express or implied, and specifically disclaims any implied warranties of title, merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose and non-infringement. No advice, opinions or information, whether oral or written, obtained from PropertyRoom or through the website or services shall create any warranty. Some jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion of certain warranties, so the some of the foregoing exclusions may not apply to you. This warranty gives you specific legal rights and you may also have other legal rights which vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.
What i’d really like is the ability to custom tune the standard speed settings with regard to the torque curve/output and perhaps have a top speed of 18mph or thereabouts, back when i could ride a normal bike under my own steam there were some sections of my local trails where i could easily maintain 20mph+ through the single track (allowing for acceleration out of the corners) as it was on a slight fall line. It’s all brain-farts at the moment so the tuning kit is still in my toolbox and it may stay in there.


yep ..they’re fantastic …one of my best ever buys … stopped biking 3 yrs ago due to suddenly developing pain in both knees ..diagnosed as arthritis . recently bought an ebike to try and make a comeback and believe it or not i’ve lost 10kg and knees are getting better all the time so much so i normally only use the lowest assist setting . Try one ..it’ll put a smile on your face guaranteed!
Last year, the Trek Powerfly 9 LT was one of the only ebikes with geometry and handling that came close to a modern enduro bike. For 2018, Trek has built on that winning formula with new frame. It’s lowered the battery in the downtube, while adding a stiffer Fox 36 fork, more powerful SRAM RE brakes and a stronger Bontrager wheelset. All welcome improvements to a really capable bike. The price has also crept up to reflect the changes. The biggest transformation however, is that Rocky Mountain has raised the ebike bar to a new high with the Altitude Powerplay.

Maintenance is relatively easy if you can get past the bad instructions and perform regular service on your bike. The Ancheer Power Plus has as numerous safety features, a long battery range and enough speed to get you there fast. Running cost is literally pennies a day with the charge anywhere battery and if you run out of power you can still peddle your way home.

×