A couple of issues I see with the use of the bikes: First of all, once I arrive at my treestand, I need to find a place to hide it so it doesn’t attract the attention of deer. Secondly, when I have a lot of gear to haul in and out, will the bike and trailer be able to handle it all? Will I be able to pull a deer out with the bike, or will it mean one more trip back and forth to my truck?
Ride1Ups Ghost Model is one of the top electric bikes for under $1000, and is a new take on the classic 1932 Roadster Bike. This electric bike is a simple and practical electric city bike that is perfect for carrying out your daily chores and trips around town. Compared to other models from Ride1Up this model was designed as a top quality budget electric bike with the design and quality of the bike on par with more expensive electric bikes. The bike features includes the rack and fenders, integrated LED taillight and headlight and it also has a 500W battery that allows the bike to reach a speed of 26MPH

The Blix Vika+ is a folding e-bike with a utilitarian execution: At nearly 50 pounds, it’s heavy for its size, and the folding mechanism isn’t as slick as other folding bikes we’ve tested. That said, it does fold into a small package and feels sturdy enough for riding between errands. The geared hub motor is adequately powerful and an included throttle makes it easier to get off the line. A rear rack, front and rear lights, and a kickstand come with the bike—it’s everything you need for zippy urban commuting.


With an electric mountain bike (or e-MTB) that gives you assistance up to 25kph, it’s possible to pack twice as much riding into the same amount of time. Those five great trails that you normally ride after work can now be ridden twice. That boring singletrack climb on your lunchtime loop suddenly becomes the highlight of your day. With the extra push from the motor it’s easy to double the distance covered, or do the same ride in half the time.
You can take it to anywhere you like as the bike is perfect for exploring wild trails, discovering the nooks of city streets, and daily commute. The motor produces no noise, so there is no way to disrupt the tranquility of natural trails. The more than 4-inch wide fat tires will roll over even on snowy and sandy tracks. The width of the tires and the full-suspension design will cushion the paths for you and help to cruise through the climbs and bomb down the descents.
In our head to head range test, the Rocky Mountain took the win by traveling 20 miles and 4,297 vertical feet. It is worth mentioning that our tester felt that he worked a little harder while range testing the Rocky Mountain than the other bikes we tested. The Giant wasn't far behind at 19.02 miles and 4,000 vertical feet, and the YT Decoy almost tied that with 19.01 miles and 4,039 vertical feet. The Specialized was nipping at their heels with 18.71 miles and 3,949 feet. The Ghost Hybride SL AMR was the least impressive with a range of just 16.75 miles and 3,559 vertical feet. The outlier in this comparison is the Bulls E-Stream with a 650Wh battery. We were not able to test the Bulls directly against these other competitors, but we did notice that you can ride it significantly farther than any of these other contenders. During one of our test rides, we rode the Bulls 24 miles and 4,500 vertical feet, and the battery still wasn't depleted. More battery storage equals longer rides; it's just that simple.
The Ghost is a sleek, quiet and practical bike with everything you need to carry out your daily chores and trips around town. It’s a simple and refined electric city bike – no gears, no shifter. No front suspension either, but there is the 500W motor that will get you to speeds up to 26mph. The design, the build quality and the specs are on par with much more expensive bikes. Features include the rack and fenders, an integrated LED tail light as well as a headlight. Because of the flat top tube frame style that is 28″ off the ground this bike is fits best to riders 5’4″-6’1″ tall.
You can take it to anywhere you like as the bike is perfect for exploring wild trails, discovering the nooks of city streets, and daily commute. The motor produces no noise, so there is no way to disrupt the tranquility of natural trails. The more than 4-inch wide fat tires will roll over even on snowy and sandy tracks. The width of the tires and the full-suspension design will cushion the paths for you and help to cruise through the climbs and bomb down the descents.
The original Power Plus model was one of the most popular in its class, introducing the joy and practicalities of e-bikes to a huge audience around the world.  The CX1 builds on that success, adding a NEW more powerful brushless motor, a NEW upgraded battery, a 21-speed gear system, and improved reliability.  The steel frame, strong brakes, suspension and quick-shift gears offer all the qualities of a premium mountain bike with the added feature of three pedal assist modes. 

The Felt Redemption-E 50 is a 140/150mm travel all-mountain bike. At 53.5 pounds, it is the second heaviest in this group, but bike rockets up non-technical climbs, which makes it awesome for shuttle runs, but it can’t disguise its heft when navigating tricky switchbacks and rock gardens. Rather than moving the bike around with your body, you learn to mash the pedals and let the motor bludgeon the trail, trusting the e-mtb-tuned suspension to handle the hits. The Shimano motor's “trail” mode has all the power you’ll need, and quick surge of torque from stop means you have to be ready for the bike to take off before you get on the pedals. Everything on the Redemption-E 50 works well—the Shimano Deore brakes are powerful and the shifting is crisp—but the Redemption E-50 doesn’t work well everywhere. Buy it if you’ve got smooth and open trails to rip; skip it if you’re fond of crafting the perfect line through rough and technical singletrack.
The least-expensive bike in this roundup and, at 48.6 pounds, our size large Haro Shift Plus i/O 5 is the second-lightest in this group as well. Only the $8,250 Specialized was lighter. The Shift Plus i/O 5 was nimble enough to traverse the most technical trails we could find, and it was much easier to manage on rocky climbs than heavier, longer-travel e-MTBs. The Shimano Steps motor has loads of torque. However, in Trail mode, the bike still lurches forward as soon as you get on the pedals, so you've got to point it where you're willing to go before clipping in. Haro has done well to keep the price down, but we'd pay a slight premium if the bike were to come with a dropper post, which makes it a little less scary to sling a nearly 50-pound bike down a mountain.
You've gotta get up to get down, and one of the purposes of e-bikes is to make it much easier to do so. Since we spend significantly more time climbing than descending, we felt it was important to rate how well these bikes perform when pointed uphill. Climbing on an e-MTB with pedal assist support is somewhat different than climbing on a bike without a motor. These bikes are capable of carrying some serious speed uphill, changing the climbing dynamic with a much faster pace, often tossing finesse out the window in favor of power and momentum. The heavy weight of these bikes and plus-sized tires gives them incredible traction, keeping them planted on the ground, and dampening switches can be left wide open to enjoy the added traction benefits of active rear suspension. Each bike's geometry, handling, and power output all played a role in how well these bikes performed on the ascents, and we had plenty of time to test them while rallying back uphill for more downhill laps.
The Bulls E-Stream EVO AM 4 is a new addition to our electric mountain bike test and it didn't take long for our testers to fall in love with this new contender. This bike comes ready to rumble with a beefy enduro ready build with 150mm of front and rear wheel travel controlled by a stout RockShox Lyrik fork up front. Testers found this bike to come alive at speed with stable and confidence-inspiring trail manners that preferred to go fast, and big 2.8-inch wide Schwalbe tires that provided heaps of traction. Bulls has done a good job designing this beast, with a powerful and smooth Brose drive unit cleanly integrated into the frame along with a large 650Wh battery. The motor lays down very smooth power in all of its output settings and is one of the quietest models we tested. The large battery storage capacity provides the longest distance range of all the models in the test so you can stay out longer and ride farther than on models with smaller batteries. The e-bike controls have relatively good ergonomics and an easy to read display.
In our view, e-bikes are approaching a crossroads in concept and design. Heading off in one direction are longer travel, enduro-style e-bikes, which are largely designed for cruising up and then blasting back down. Plotting a slightly different course is the idea of a lightweight model that rides much more like a normal mountain bike, but requires more work from the rider. Of the two approaches, both have their benefits, but it’s the latter that gets us the most excited. Once the overall weight falls into the 16-17kg range (the lightest bikes are currently19-20kg) it’s going to be really hard to tell the difference between an e-bike and a regular trail bike on the descents and the flat, but you get the benefit of a gentle push up the climbs.
Amazing bike, quick. On the flat average 21mph full power, after 3-4 miles average 18mph. A lot of hills in SoCal so this 1/3 hp motor does it’s job well with pedal assist on very steep grades. With electric only mode and heavy, steep, long hills this bike does its job pushing through a 16 mile commute with some energy to spare with a 190lb load of me and my gear. This bike could do much more with flat and pedal assist modes maybe twice as far. Recommend you use smaller tires 1.75 vs the standard 1.95 to achieve my results. Continental contact travels work great!
A: Electric bikes are designed with compact electric motors which are usually attached to the back of the front wheel and housed in a hub. There are a number of controls with a user interface which is where all the motor operation is done by the rider. Here one can control the speed, braking and other things such as battery management. Some e-bikes have other electric components such as a sensor which also help in geometry and stabilization.

Pros versatile, fits water bottle, least e-bike looking, good battery life, low center of gravity Good controls, huge distance range, confidence inspiring at speed, good component spec Very nice build, stealthy looks, hard-charging downhill performance Reasonably priced, good distance range, well rounded performance, solid component spec Smooth and consistent power output, modern geometry,

Keeping track of speed and battery life will be easy because this bike comes with a Bafang LCD color display.  This eBike can stop on a dime by utilizing a set of powerful hydraulic disc brakes.  Built to last, this model comes with a strong aluminum alloy frame.  Driving the Storm down hard to reach trails and other backwoods locations will be a smooth ride thanks to the Shimano Altus 8-speed gearing system. 


After that, changes mostly come down to purpose. Moterra riders have 160mm of travel, 29-inch wheels and "beefier" components, with the descent-focused Moterra SE packs a 180mm fork, a Super Deluxe Piggyback Shock and stickier Maxxis Assegai tires. You won't have quite as rough a ride down the hill, then. The Habit NEO shares the same wheel size, but switches to 140mm front and 130mm rear suspension to make it nimbler. All of the new bikes tout carbon fiber frames and a "proportional response" suspension that changes with the size of the frame.
As with most bikes on this list, the Norco Sight takes it's design cues from a non-motorized sibling. The regular Sight is an aggressive, all-mountain ride with a 160mm fork and 150mm of rear travel. The VLT electric version adds a Shimano STEPS E8000 motor and downtube integrated 630 Wh battery. The geometry is not the same as the unplugged Sight—due to the motor and battery—but still goes low and slack with a longer wheelbase for added stability. The 66 degree head tube angle, 440mm reach (size medium), and and 75 degree seat tube angle are what you would expect from such an aggressive bike. The SRAM GX Eagle drivetrain gives a wide gear range so you can shift down into a comfortable low gear before needing to move up to the next assistance level. The Code R brakes are powerful enough to handle the speeds that come from the forces of braking a 50 pound bike at high speed and they can be used lightly to maximize your control over the bike through turns. The Sight VLT is for hard-charging, technical riders who are looking for the fastest route down the mountain and want to turn around and ride back up to do it again.

Scott’s Genius eRIDE 920 is another bike with Shimano’s excellent Steps E8000 motor. The narrow width of this motor—same as a standard Shimano mountain bike crank—is a nice feature, as is the support and customization offered by Shimano’s e-Tube apps. Boost mode lets you cruise comfortably at up to 20 miles per hour on pavement, while Trail mode doles out torque more smoothly and increases range. But compared to the Bosch in e-mtb mode (comparable to Shimano's Trail mode), Shimano’s faster and harder-hitting torque is less desirable for navigating technical terrain. The 29-inch wheels and 150mm of travel provide the ability to straight-line some really gnarly stuff. This bike is meant for riding big and riding hard. The big travel, long trail, and slack head angle give you a bike that loves to go straight and gobble up rowdy trails. And despite being such a long bike, it still handles technical terrain well.
Mountain biking is all about having fun, right? About getting out there, enjoying the great outdoors, exercising your body and freeing your mind. So what if we told you there was a type of bike that lets you ride further, faster, and have even more fun? One that even made you LOL on the climbs? You’d still have to work for your rewards, but by assisting your efforts, it allowed you to wring every little drop of enjoyment out of your rides. Are electric mountain bikes allowed on trails?
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