Fly Rides is back with the top 10 electric for commuting in 2018! Why top ten instead of eight? Because there are too many good choices this year! Electric commuting bikes are primed for more popularity this year than ever. With major cities across the country improving their biking infrastructure (finally), and electric bikes now having the capability to take you 60 miles and further, commuting by ebike grows all the time. Let us help you figure out the best option for your commute with our blog on the top 10 electric bikes for commuting in 2018! Read on for our full list.
Both land management regulators and mountain bike trail access advocates have argued for bans of electric bicycles on outdoor trails that are accessible to mountain bikes, citing potential safety hazards as well as the potential for electric bikes to damage trails. A study conducted by the International Mountain Bicycling Association, however, found that the physical impacts of low-powered pedal-assist electric mountain bikes may be similar to traditional mountain bikes.[68]
Another type of electric assist motor, often referred to as the mid-drive system, is increasing in popularity. With this system, the electric motor is not built into the wheel but is usually mounted near (often under) the bottom bracket shell. In more typical configurations, a cog or wheel on the motor drives a belt or chain that engages with a pulley or sprocket fixed to one of the arms of the bicycle's crankset. Thus the propulsion is provided at the pedals rather than at the wheel, being eventually applied to the wheel via the bicycle's standard drive train.
Using an electric bike for long-distance touring has its pros and cons. The motor will help carry the extra weight of your kit, particularly on the hills, but you have the added hassle of having to charge the battery every night. You’ll want a powerful motor and a good battery, though if you’re fully loaded, don’t expect to achieve the maximum advertised range.
Shell Eco-Marathon Americas Competition 2015 1st and 2nd Place Winners Both Used an Electric Bike Technologies Hub Motor! The Mater Dei Supermileage 3 Team of Mater Dei High School, in Evansville, Ind., took the top spot in the Battery-Electric Prototype category. The team built a vehicle using an electric bike motor from Electric Bike Technologies USA and won the electric plug in class at the 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 Shell Eco-Marathon Americas. They...
This is the Freway Buffalo. It’s an ebike. I couldn’t say no to a free ebike to play around on, so we’re gonna have some fun with this thing for sure. It’s not a high end ebike like the Specialized Turbo Levo, but it only costs 1700 bucks whereas the Turbo Levo costs as much as a car. Although it’s marketed as a mountain bike, I’d put it in the commuter category. It’s got a big cushy seat, a really long stem, and those antler things on the handlebars. I’m not obligated to give you guys anything but the truth, so let’s put this thing together and take an objective look at it. First, let’s cruise on over to Freway’s website.
You should also think about how much gear you are going to need to carry. The reason this will affect your decision is because some electric bikes don’t have the capability to mount a front rack while others do. Plan on doing a 3-day trip? You could probably get away with just a rear rack. My advice though would to be to purchase an electric bike with the capability to mount a front rack as well. This way, if you decide to plan a longer trip in the future, you can simply buy a rack and be on your way instead of potentially having to buy a new bike.

The high quality Drive Units from Bosch eBike Systems are the power behind your eBike – and are designed to be both functional and attractive. The gearing layout ensures optimal integration of the Drive Unit design and increased ground clearance. Light and compact: The reduced volume achieves reduced weight and a small distance between pedals, enhancing the ergonomics of your pedelec. The eBike Systems ActiveLine and Active Line Plus both received the Red Dot Award 2017 for product design.


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The first regularly produced device resembling the modern bicycle was unveiled in 1818. It was called the Dandy Horse. The two-wheeled ride-on Dandy Horse was the brainchild of German inventor Baron Karl Drais, and it featured a handle bar, a padded seat, and two inline wheels of nearly equal size. What it did not feature were pedals; this was a "running machine," thus its name in German, Laufmachine. The Dandy Horse saw only a flicker of popularity, and was largely an historical footnote within a handful of years, though its design is nearly mimicked in the child's balance bike of today.
Riding a pedal-assisted road bike may seem counterintuitive but during longer training sessions, the minimal addition of power helps prevent overall muscle fatigue and injury. Similarly, those looking to enjoy longer scenic routes will appreciate the general boost an electric drive provides. With a top speed of 28 mph, the Road E+1 uses three power modes to give you ultimate control over your ride and assistance level. A four-point sensory system monitors the pedaling force allowing the motor to amplify your movements seamlessly.
Electric bikes are a green alternative to driving a vehicle. Studies carried out in several towns and cities show that the average car speed in rush hour traffic can dip as low as 18 to 20 mph. Electric bike speed can be as high as 15 mph. With an electric bike, you can reduce pollution, improve fitness, and still arrive at the same time as your car-bound colleagues.

From the tropics to the polar caps, Stark Drive is designed to handle a broad range of temperature conditions with a ruggedized frame and high quality battery pack as well as all terrain tires (standard) or even our fat tire model. Take Stark Drive with you wherever you go. When Designing Stark Drive in Stockholm Sweden we were very conscious of the fact that weather effects battery life on your electric bike so we designed our electric bike with this in mind.
E-bike usage worldwide has experienced rapid growth since 1998. In 2016 there were 210 million electric bikes worldwide used daily.[33] It is estimated that there were roughly 120 million e-bikes in China in early 2010, and sales are expanding rapidly in India, the United States of America, Germany, the Netherlands,[2] and Switzerland.[34] A total of 700,000 e-bikes were sold in Europe in 2010, up from 200,000 in 2007 and 500,000 units in 2009.[35]

Forward-thinking parents are giving up thier SUVs and opting for electric cargo bikes for getting the family around. Cargo bikes are seeing a resurgence in popularity with the rise of electric conversion systems that convert these awesome people movers into family toting electric vehicles. One year ago the Wall Street Journal ran a full page article in their weekend edition entitled The New Station Wagon. Since then the trend for...
Featuring a Bosch Performance CX motor, a Suntour Aion air suspension fork, X-Fusion O2 air-sprung element rear shock, and 27.5-inch Schwalbe Almotion tires, the Delite nuvinci is the perfect commuter slash “town and country” ebike. But at more than $6,000, the price is sure to stop people in their tracks. However, Riese and Muller make every one of those dollars count as it’s included a slew of accessories which make the bike that much more appealing. From an included Abus bike lock and integrated lighting to water bottles (and holders) and built-in luggage rack, little to no after-market additions are necessary.
EcoBike offers a state of the art battery and frame design, and artfully combines the highest quality parts from the most competitive manufacturers – Shimano, SRAM, and Cionlli, to name a few. The result is a masterpiece in convenience, reliability, and style. Combining style with functionality, EcoBike is a world-renowned designer of quality electric bicycles, sold all over Europe and North America.
Controllers for brushless motors: E-bikes require high initial torque and therefore models that use brushless motors typically have Hall sensor commutation for speed and angle measurement. An electronic controller provides assistance as a function of the sensor inputs, the vehicle speed and the required force. The controllers generally allow input by means of potentiometer or Hall Effect twist grip (or thumb-operated lever throttle), closed-loop speed control for precise speed regulation, protection logic for over-voltage, over-current and thermal protection. Bikes with a pedal assist function typically have a disc on the crank shaft featuring a ring of magnets coupled with a Hall sensor giving rise to a series of pulses, the frequency of which is proportional to pedaling speed. The controller uses pulse width modulation to regulate the power to the motor. Sometimes support is provided for regenerative braking but infrequent braking and the low mass of bicycles limits recovered energy. An implementation is described in an application note for a 200 W, 24 V Brushless DC (BLDC) motor.[43]
But with increased demand and production, as well as technology improvements thanks to advances in the electric car industry, the cost of components like lithium-ion batteries comes down, Weinert explains. Now, e-bikes are on the market as low as around $1,200 (like the Monroe 250 from Schwinn, available in November 2017). Plus, the competition is stiff. “There are more brands producing than there were five years ago, and they all have to be competitive," LaLonde says.
The Patriot DreamE results from the combination of the popular Day 6 bicycle with the Kinetic8-Fun mid-drive motor kit. The unique Day 6 styling eliminates leaning forward, so you sit perfectly upright. That means there is no more stress on wrists, neck, back, and crotch. It also means a superior breathing position and a better way to enjoy the scenery. The step-through design makes for easy mounts and dismounts, while the low seat allows the rider to reach the ground with both feet for stability and safety.
What a treat to do business with the folks at Hill Topper. I now have two commuter units one in Idaho and one in Denver my average ride is 25 to 35 miles. I have been riding for about 15 years but being the age of 80 I needed a little help the past few years. I researched electric bikes a few years ago even rode a couple here in Denver but I wanted my own personal look and feel. So about five years ago I found Hill Toppers. What a treat first the units are the best but that is part of the good part the people at Hill Toppers are the very best to work with and enjoy. I had to have a knee replacement last July well thank god for my bike it was the best therapy I could ask for. When in Idaho I get to ride along the Snake river what a treat knowing that I have this unit to help if the wind or rain shows up. When in Denver I cover a lot of area as they have wonderful bike trails all over the area. I ride all of the downtown area and the Cherry Creek dam up and over it takes some effort to get that done but with the help of Hill topper it is a beautiful ride up and overlooking the whole of Colorado. Thank you Andrew,Charles,Sam,Mark.
The first regularly produced device resembling the modern bicycle was unveiled in 1818. It was called the Dandy Horse. The two-wheeled ride-on Dandy Horse was the brainchild of German inventor Baron Karl Drais, and it featured a handle bar, a padded seat, and two inline wheels of nearly equal size. What it did not feature were pedals; this was a "running machine," thus its name in German, Laufmachine. The Dandy Horse saw only a flicker of popularity, and was largely an historical footnote within a handful of years, though its design is nearly mimicked in the child's balance bike of today.
Though aside from the extra battery and abundance of included accessories, Riese and Muller’s use of a Gate’s belt drive means no shifting of gears, no greasy maintenance, and much higher durability. If you have the money to spend, Riese and Muller’s Delite nuvinci is one of the best on the market and an ebike we just couldn’t get enough of during our own tests.
More powerful pedelecs which are not legally classed as bicycles are dubbed S-Pedelecs (short for Schnell-Pedelecs, i.e. Speedy-Pedelecs) in Germany. These have a motor more powerful than 250 watts and less limited, or unlimited, pedal-assist, i.e. the motor does not stop assisting the rider once 25 km/h has been reached. S-Pedelec class e-bikes are therefore usually classified as mopeds or motorcycles rather than as bicycles and therefore may (depending on the jurisdiction) need to be registered and insured, the rider may need some sort of driver's license (either car or motorcycle) and motorcycle helmets may have to be worn.[14] In the United States, many states have adopted S-Pedelecs into the Class 3 category. Class 3 ebikes are limited to <=750 watts of power and 28 mph.[15]
This bike is named the GSD because with it you can Get Stuff Done. Twenty-inch wheels keep the center of gravity low so heavy payloads—it's rated up to 400lbs—are easy to balance and a short (for a cargo bike) 70-inch wheelbase, similar to a standard single bike, make the GSD easy to maneuver. Designed with the urban commuter in mind, the bike can easily break down to 60 percent of its original size to fit into the back of a car and the rear rack doubles as a stand that allows it to stand upright to minimize space inside tight apartments. Put two child seats on the back and take the family along, or drop the seat and let you kid take the bike out himself—anyone from 4'10" to 6'5" can ride this bike. Last but not least, the GSD gives you the option of adding a second battery to extend your range up to about 150 miles on a single charge.
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