When it comes to the distance it can cover at a single charge, it really depends. For instance, if you live 13 miles from work and ride on a smooth, flat pavement, the bike has enough power to get you home. The battery level does decrease when the motor is under increased stress—like when you’re riding up a hilly terrain—but it quickly levels itself when you go back riding on a flat road surface.
With 170mm travel, aggressive angles and Shimano’s superbly calibrated STEPS motor, the Focus Sam2 is an enduro bike with a built-in shuttle. With the bolt on TEC pack you really can climb to new heights, but without it the smaller capacity internal battery means you need to be ultra economical with your energy use. It’s also frustrating that the internal battery can’t be removed easily for charging. By far the biggest frustration with the Jam2 though is that the sizing isn’t very generous and standover clearance is limited. It’s still a great e-bike, but when you’re spending this much money, you can afford to be fussy.
Chip them, & your asking for a world of potential legal trouble if your evolved in an accident & giving fuel to those ppl frothing at the mouth for (all) MTB’s to be banned from share trails. That said if it’s chipped it shouldn’t be on legal MTB trails, as there classed as basically motorbikes (very simple overview), so suggesting you only use the ‘dongle’ off-road argument falls flat on its face
I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs.
Amazing bike, quick. On the flat average 21mph full power, after 3-4 miles average 18mph. A lot of hills in SoCal so this 1/3 hp motor does it’s job well with pedal assist on very steep grades. With electric only mode and heavy, steep, long hills this bike does its job pushing through a 16 mile commute with some energy to spare with a 190lb load of me and my gear. This bike could do much more with flat and pedal assist modes maybe twice as far. Recommend you use smaller tires 1.75 vs the standard 1.95 to achieve my results. Continental contact travels work great!
The build quality, however, is generally fantastic. It feels sturdy and strong, the clip to hold the fold in place never feels like it’s coming loose and the wheels feel like they can conquer anything. Also the suspension system is quite impressive and isn’t even included on the non-folding Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike. This suspension system and the strong frame help give the Ancheer the ability to comfortably hold riders who weigh up to 150kg (330 lbs).
Why We Like It: This is a very capable mountain bike that just about anyone can ride and enjoy. It has great suspension, a smooth ride, and amazing tires that grip everything. The charge time and the battery’s odd position on the frame are our only gripes, but those things aside, you can’t argue with the power and quality of this fat electric bike. It makes a heck of a beach cruiser. You’ll love everything from the front hub to the back hub.
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yep ..they’re fantastic …one of my best ever buys … stopped biking 3 yrs ago due to suddenly developing pain in both knees ..diagnosed as arthritis . recently bought an ebike to try and make a comeback and believe it or not i’ve lost 10kg and knees are getting better all the time so much so i normally only use the lowest assist setting . Try one ..it’ll put a smile on your face guaranteed!
Meter with 3-speed smart buttons: The speed button helps you to choose how first you want to go. The bike is by default at ‘’low’’ level. To increase the peddle assist level, press the ‘’+’’ and you will switch from low, to mid or high. “High” is the maximum level that will provide fast speed while pedaling, and to decrease speed level you need to press the ‘’-” button. The ’-” can also be used to eliminate the three pedal assist levels and switch into pure E-bike where you are only required twist the throttle as you cruise all the way. 

Weight isn’t anything like a critical as one would assume. Weight distribution however is a different matter and this is where geometry, specifically the ratio of the front centre measurement to the chain stay length really comes into play. Battery placement is important too, and smaller batteries give an edge in the handling stakes while robbing the bike of range.
The suspension works, but there isn’t any true dampening. That means you’re just riding around on springs. On a real full suspension e-bike (i.e. a few thousand dollars) you get actual oil-dampened shocks. Those absorb bumps and dampen the shock. With springs, the bike bounces a few times after bumps, with the energy dissipating through the spring stretching and compressing.
I've now had this Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike for 6 months and have over 2,400 miles on the odometer. That said, considering what I know about this bike now, I'd buy it again today, in a heartbeat. It's an excellent bike and suites my needs exactly. Before finding this bike on Amazon I tried several bikes in local shops to understand the fundamental features. I got this bike for exercise and for my short commute to work. I needed a bike that could accommodate my bad knees, ruined by athletics and years of running on hard pavement. I am unable to effectively ride a regular bike in the area where I live, which is very hilly (Seattle area). On a normal bike (my 15-year old mountain bike) I can't transfer enough energy to the pedals to get up the final street to my house, my knees don't allow it. This bike takes the edge off the hills but still allows me to minimize or turn off the assist when I don't really need it. I don't use this bike off-road as a mountain bike. I use it for riding on paved roads and urban biking/walking trails.
I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.
When it comes to the distance it can cover at a single charge, it really depends. For instance, if you live 13 miles from work and ride on a smooth, flat pavement, the bike has enough power to get you home. The battery level does decrease when the motor is under increased stress—like when you’re riding up a hilly terrain—but it quickly levels itself when you go back riding on a flat road surface.
With an electric mountain bike (or e-MTB) that gives you assistance up to 25kph, it’s possible to pack twice as much riding into the same amount of time. Those five great trails that you normally ride after work can now be ridden twice. That boring singletrack climb on your lunchtime loop suddenly becomes the highlight of your day. With the extra push from the motor it’s easy to double the distance covered, or do the same ride in half the time.
Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.
It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
The Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike frame is solid. In fact too solid for me. The frame is thick with such a girth that my rear wheel bike rack doesn't fit (around the frame or into the pre-drilled holes because the disk brake is in the way). Shocks seem to work fine. I do enjoy having the kick stand further back, provides a lot more stabilization to the bike vice being closer to the pedals.
Why We Like It: Razor is a name to be reckoned with in the industry, and the Razor EcoSmart Metro is highly rated online, like a lot of their products. This model gets a spot on our rankings thanks to its great build quality and nice top speed. It doesn’t hurt that it’s affordable and from a trusted brand as well. It has a max speed of 18 miles per hour, a powerful 500 W motor and it delivers 40 minutes of continuous use.
As I said before, going up hills might require some pedaling, but it is SO MUCH EASIER with the motor running. I feel like a higher voltage is used on level 3 pedal assist than can be gotten just using the hand turn, though. It takes a few pedals for the pedal assist to kick in which can be annoying, but it does save some battery on initial acceleration. You also have to be careful pedaling around to park the bike or at a street corner waiting for traffic because you DO NOT want the motor to kick in and send you into a workbench or worse ... oncoming traffic.
I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.
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