The distance range of an electric mountain bike refers to the distance you can travel on a single battery charge given a specific set of circumstances. All of the e-bikes we tested have roughly the same battery storage capacity, except for the Bulls E-Stream, but external variables like rider weight, pedaling input, terrain, trail conditions, and weather conditions may all affect the length of time or distance that a battery charge will last. To compare the distance range of the models in our test we had the same tester take each of the bikes out in their highest support setting and do laps on a very steep paved hill until the batteries ran down from fully charged to completely dead. When we finished, we recorded the distance and vertical gain that each model was able to complete and easily, and objectively determined our winner.
Powerfly FS 7 is a full suspension mid-fat electric mountain bike with a fully integrated battery and a performance suspension package for incredible capability on more rugged trails. A Bosch Performance CX motor for speeds up to 20 mph, 27.5+ mid-fat tires for extra stability and traction, RockShox suspension, and the latest in e-MTB frame design will bring your off-road adventures to entirely new places.
The 2019 Specialized Turbo Levo Comp returns to our electric mountain bike test and claims our Editor's Choice Award for the second year in a row. The new model has several notable changes over the previous version we tested including a new frame design, 29-inch wheels, 150mm of front and rear wheel travel, a new motor, and an updated battery charge and power output display. All these new changes have only helped to solidify the Turbo Levo Comp's position at the top of the podium. It still has the same well-rounded performance on the trail that makes it "feel the most like a mountain bike." It is more playful and agile than the competition, yet it still manages to charge the fall-line just as hard. Like previous Turbo Levo models, Specialized has very stealthily integrated the battery and motor into the frame giving it a low center of gravity and a very non-e-bike look. The new Specialized 2.1 motor is very quiet, plus it weighs less and has reduced the overall weight of the bike by more than 2 lbs.
Electric mountain bikes are here, growing in popularity, and despite some access concerns—and perhaps because of them—continue to get better, more enjoyable to ride. Their small motors help you ride faster, farther, and can making challenging climbs less daunting. We tested 10 of the most exciting new models to help you find the right one for you. Read quick reviews of top five options below, or scroll deeper for helpful buying advice and longer reviews of every option.  

Mountain biking is fun and full of adventures. When riding on rough terrains, it is important to use the best and cheap electric mountain bikes for your riding needs, as they offer full suspension and make mountain terrains easier for the rider. If you are a bike enthusiast, you have likely of electric mountain bikes, which are gaining lots of popularity in the market today. These electric mountain bikes are great for providing extra assistance to the rider on steeper and more challenging terrains.
The motor is powerful enough to allow you to hit up to 35kmh on a 10.4ah battery that stays alive for 50km. With the fat Kenda tires and suspension fork, the bike does not need any pedal assistance to smoothly roll on even surfaces. The PAS provides five levels of assistance and even the first level is quite powerful. The fifth level will just blow you away with speed and torque and there is no way that you can pedal fast enough to meet any resistance.
With an electric mountain bike (or e-MTB) that gives you assistance up to 25kph, it’s possible to pack twice as much riding into the same amount of time. Those five great trails that you normally ride after work can now be ridden twice. That boring singletrack climb on your lunchtime loop suddenly becomes the highlight of your day. With the extra push from the motor it’s easy to double the distance covered, or do the same ride in half the time.

Over several months, our team of four professional mountain bike testers rode each of the electric mountain bikes in our test selection on a variety of trails and terrain in a range of weather conditions. We had each tester ride each of the bikes numerous times, often riding the different models back to back for the sake of comparison. We didn't go easy on them. Instead, we treated them all as if they were our own, putting them all through the wringer to identify their strengths and weaknesses. We scrutinized every aspect of each e-bike's performance and scored them all on several rating metrics, e-bike controls, downhill performance, uphill performance, power output, and distance range. Each of these metrics is described in greater detail below. It is important to note that during our testing, our impressions of these e-bikes changed dramatically. Our first impressions didn't exactly stick. It was essential for us to test the different models head-to-head and make direct comparisons to flush out the differences.
For the electric mountain bikes, it is vital to check out the battery type. This powerful electric bike comes with a powerful 10.4Ah lithium-ion battery to ensure that it delivers excellent services. Besides this, the bike is also driven by a powerful electric 350W brushless motor for great speed. You can always shift the speed since it uses the 7-speed Shimano system, which makes it great for all users.
Our All Terrain electric fat bike is the ideal electric bike for hunting thanks to it’s whisper-quiet operation, 20+ mile range on throttle only and 28 mph top speed. The 4″ tires are ready to roll smoothly over all types of terrain from soft mud to deep snow. See how we’re quickly changing the game for hunters all across America with our affordable and high quality electric fat bike.
This is a compact bike that can be assembled and reassembled quickly and easily, though it might take a few attempts to practice. It has a range when fully charged of just under 30 miles, which is at the higher end of standard when it comes to electric bikes. It has quite a powerful motor at 250W which only adds to how smooth the ride is when using this bike.
The ECOTRIC Fat Tire electric bike ticks all the boxes for potential and pro mountain bikers alike. It is designed for and therefore equipped to deal with any number of different terrains including the beach and dirt roads also. Consequently, you can take the bike with you anywhere with ease and the comfort of knowing it won’t let you down as it goes, not just on your mountain biking adventures!
Seven batteries keep you powered without adding much bulk to the bike. These state-of-the-art lithium batteries are built to last up to 10 years. A single charge provides a range of 20 to 25 miles. It takes just 4 hours to reach full charge. The battery pack mounts to the frame and sits directly beneath the seat making it less noticeable. 300W motor with variable speed throttle provides powerful propulsion to achieve a speed of up to 20 mph.
The class 3 Aventon Pace 500 urban e-bike has five levels of pedal assist and tops out at 28 mph. But the Pace has something not found on a lot of modern e-bikes. In addition to pedal power, it also has a throttle—in the case of the Pace, a small thumb paddle on the left side of the handlebar next to the control unit that holds at a steady 20 mph, no pedaling required. The bike itself has an aluminum frame, a swept-back handlebar, ergo grips, a sturdy kickstand, hydraulic disc brakes, 8-speed Shimano Altus shifting and gearing, 27.5x2.2-inch Kenda e-bike-rated tires, a saddle the size of Texas, and good ol’ classic city/commuter-bike geometry. It doesn’t come equipped with fenders or a rear rack, but you can add them. Power comes in the form of a 500-watt rear-hub motor, a semi-integrated battery on the down tube (with a range of up to 50 miles), and a backlit display unit mounted on the stem.

The Kemanner electric mountain bike is one of the more environmentally friendly bikes on the review list. It has an environmentally friendly battery that has a low charging time (4 hours) and a large capacity for range (25 KM). This mountain bike also has incredibly strong and thick tires to make the bike more durable and ensure extra protection when riding on rougher terrain.
Riding a pedal-assisted road bike may seem counterintuitive but during longer training sessions, the minimal addition of power helps prevent overall muscle fatigue and injury. Similarly, those looking to enjoy longer scenic routes will appreciate the general boost an electric drive provides. With a top speed of 28 mph, the Road E+1 uses three power modes to give you ultimate control over your ride and assistance level. A four-point sensory system monitors the pedaling force allowing the motor to amplify your movements seamlessly.
Every e-bike here uses a hub motor rather than a mid-drive motor. Hub motors (the original industry standard and the lower-cost of the two) can be located on either the front or, more commonly, the rear wheel. Hub motors typically don’t offer the same natural maneuverability as today’s increasingly more common mid-drive motors because their weight is concentrated in the front or rear of the bike. In contrast, a mid-drive motor’s weight is low and centered over the bottom bracket, resulting in better control and a more balanced ride feel, much like a traditional bike. A hub motor’s top speed typically maxes out at 20 mph.
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With its steep seat tube angle and powerful motor, the Rotwild E+ Ultra masters even the steepest climbs. Its high centre of gravity, however, negatively effects downhill handling. The GIANT FULL E+ 0 is a very solid eMTB where what you see is what you get, although the rather slack seat tube and bulbous-belly isn’t exactly pretty. Not so with the FOCUS SAM²: With its clean silhouette it is a bike for design lovers. But only if you get by with the small integrated battery. As soon as you mount an additional battery, not only the appearance suffers, but also the handling. The BMC Trailfox AMP has minor weaknesses in the componentry, finish and downhill handling – at a price of € 12,000 we expected considerably more. The Thömus Lightrider E1 fares better, it’s no bargain either, but the handling is outstanding. It’s a pity that the bike isn’t available outside of Switzerland. Another exotic specimen is the FANTIC XF1 Integra Enduro 160. The bike from the Italian motorcycle brand can’t deny its roots, tremendously composed and capable on the descents, though it cannot keep up with the competition when going back up – the 180 mm version of the Fantic is significantly better overall.
While we liked the value, component specification, and versatile all-around performance of the Trance E+ 2, it wasn't all gold stars. E-bikes are heavy, that is a given, but the Trance is a little heavier than most at 52 lbs 3 oz. This weight is one of the reasons this bike feels somewhat sluggish at times, especially in low-speed sections of trail. It also has mediocre e-bike controls. Sure, they are functional, but the all-in-one control's display in the form of small LED lights is difficult to see by the left grip and near impossible to read when riding in bright light conditions. Beyond that, we feel the Trance E+ 2 is a quality e-bike offered at a reasonable price.
Yes, there are less expensive ebikes on the market but most come with a few serious caveats. The Espin Sport delivers on the full promise of an electric bike, but in a more affordable fashion. This bike isn’t going to tow you around for a 60-mile round-trip endeavor but those seeking their first ebike will get plenty of return on their investment with this model.
"It's nice to have a dropper post, fully-adjustable suspension, and a frame that is well-balanced. The drive system is positioned well and performs incredibly. Trek really dialed in their rear suspension and ABP reduces skipping so the rear wheel track the ground. The removable battery pack with a handle makes this an easy bike to lift, transport, service on the trail, and park securely."
On the road, it takes only a few turns of the pedals to activate the Vado’s motor and get it up to speed. In Turbo mode — the bike’s highest level of pedal-assist — the Vado reaches speeds of up to 28 miles per hour, after which the electric drive system automatically shuts off to conserve power (and abide by local law). A built-in LED readout on the handlebars allows riders to monitor battery life, check current speed, and track calories burned while also being able to glance at distance traveled. The Turbo Vado Mission Control app (iOS/Android) also connects to the bike via Bluetooth and allows riders to further tune their ride and adjust the bike’s settings.
The Electric Juggernaut is truly an all terrain vehicle.  It has 2 massive fat tires up front, each one with it’s own front suspension and one wheel at the bike.  Originally designed for riding the soft sand dunes of California hunters quickly saw the potentials for taking it offroad.  With 2 wheels upfront it can tackle even soft snow and no risk of the front wheel washing out.
This is a question the designers and engineers of the FOCUS and BULLS bikes of this group test asked themselves. Instead of speccing them with the standard 500 Wh batteries, both have developed a sophisticated alternative. The idea: instead of riding around with unnecessarily large batteries and unnecessary weight on short tours, they integrated a smaller 375 Wh or 378 Wh battery into the bike. If you don’t have enough power for long loops, you can double the range of both bikes with an additional battery for up to a full 750 Wh. While the second battery is mounted in the front triangle of the FOCUS, it disappears sideways in the downtube of the BULLS. In practice, you’ll need the second battery relatively often with both bikes, and in either case, you should consider the additional € 499 investment in a second battery pack when you buy the bike. 

The Remote CTRL is a playful ride that’s great for varied trails with rock gardens and flow sections, and that excels on fast trails with steep, punchy climbs and tight, twisty descents. It isn’t just for riders who may need a little assistance; the E-MTB mode creates an organic riding experience that allows you to take the skills you already have and ride faster and harder. It has a 150mm RockShox Yari fork and a 132mm RockShox Monarch Plus R shock with good mid-stroke support and a progressive finish to help prevent bottoming out on big hits. The 27.5x2.8-inch Maxxis Recon tires offer plenty of traction and also help to absorb smaller hits. The Remote CTRL's excellent Bosch motor accelerates smoothly to be more manageable when pedaling through rocky sections and has more oomph at low cadence than other motors, so you can more easily ride out of tough situations if you get bogged down.
Every e-bike here uses a hub motor rather than a mid-drive motor. Hub motors (the original industry standard and the lower-cost of the two) can be located on either the front or, more commonly, the rear wheel. Hub motors typically don’t offer the same natural maneuverability as today’s increasingly more common mid-drive motors because their weight is concentrated in the front or rear of the bike. In contrast, a mid-drive motor’s weight is low and centered over the bottom bracket, resulting in better control and a more balanced ride feel, much like a traditional bike. A hub motor’s top speed typically maxes out at 20 mph.
A durable Alpha Platinum Aluminum frame that fully encases a long-range 500Wh battery for great aesthetics and ride quality on the trail, a Bosch Performance CX motor and an ergonomic Purion controller. Plus, 130mm front and rear travel with a RockShox Revelation RL fork, grippy 27.5+ mid-fat tires, Tubeless Ready Bontrager Line Comp wheels with a 54-tooth Rapid Drive hub, a dropper post, and an 11-speed Shimano SLX/XT drivetrain.
If you have a lot of hunting gear or you need an easy way to bring that trophy home, then the FatKat cargo trailer will help you get the job done.  This trailer has a 14”x 24” carrying space which can hold a lot of items.  It quickly attaches to the rear axle and has a single wheel design that adds stability and maneuverability.  Purposely built to be no wider than the eBike itself so this single wheeled trailer with rear suspension and quick attachment/release only adds to the hunt.
This utilitarian Class 3 (28 mph) road e-bike is smooth and torquey thanks to its Bosch Performance Speed motor. With a drop bar and traditional road-bike position and handling, the CrossRip+ is more suited to long rides on mixed terrain than navigating congested city streets. It comes with a rear rack—for mounting bags, not for attaching cargo directly—full fenders, a kickstand, and integrated front and rear lights (which are powered by the Bosch 500Wh battery). It features a SRAM Force 1x11 drivetrain, hydraulic disc brakes, and wide 700x38mm tires.
Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).
Update: I've had the bike about 4 months now and ride it almost everyday, it is my primary form of transportation, and I have been pleased with it's overall performance, the battery is holding up pretty well and I've never not made it home without juice to spare, the only issue I've had is with flat tires so I wanted to highly recommend putting green slime in the tires, you do not want to have to deal with getting the back tire off for a flat, but other than that the bike is running great, as others have said it is a little less powerful than you may expect but I am very satisfied with the build quality and quality of components. For saddle bags I got the type of bracket that wraps around the seat post and saddle bags meant for that kind of bracket and they have worked well for me, so I can carry my shopping and groceries easily on the bike now . http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0030RS5CA?redirect=true&ref_=cm_cr_ryp_prd_ttl_sol_18 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00K6CEPGM?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s01

The Blix Vika+ is a folding e-bike with a utilitarian execution: At nearly 50 pounds, it’s heavy for its size, and the folding mechanism isn’t as slick as other folding bikes we’ve tested. That said, it does fold into a small package and feels sturdy enough for riding between errands. The geared hub motor is adequately powerful and an included throttle makes it easier to get off the line. A rear rack, front and rear lights, and a kickstand come with the bike—it’s everything you need for zippy urban commuting.
So let's take a look at the fat tire electric hunting bikes on the list.  And this review has been updated to name a clear winner from the pack.  You can't go wrong with any of these three electric hunting bike brands but after the the last 12 months or so a clear winner has stood out so at the bottom of this review we name our favorite.  So first off we have.....
The majority of electric bikes will be fitted and made with front and rear brakes, which provide extra safety and extra stopping power. Fewer of these bikes will be equipped with brakes that are quick stopping. This is an additional safety feature, on some bikes but not all, that is highly recommended for you to look for in your electric mountain bike purchase.
Mountain biking is all about having fun, right? About getting out there, enjoying the great outdoors, exercising your body and freeing your mind. So what if we told you there was a type of bike that lets you ride further, faster, and have even more fun? One that even made you LOL on the climbs? You’d still have to work for your rewards, but by assisting your efforts, it allowed you to wring every little drop of enjoyment out of your rides.
There are various kinds and classifications of electric bikes on the market, but the most common type is the Class 1, or pedal assist, bikes which have motor units that are activated by pedaling and are limited to lower speeds. In the US, Class 1 electric bikes, the type tested and reviewed here, are limited to a top speed of 20 mph, and their motors are designed with a speed governor to regulate this. These types of e-bikes resemble modern mountain bikes, but they have significant battery packs, and small motor units integrated onto and into the frame design. The e-MTB pedal-assist motor is typically built around the bottom bracket and provides varying levels of pedaling "support" directly into the drivetrain while the cranks are turning. Most drive unit systems offer several support settings that provide pedal assistance between 25% and 100% of the user's pedaling input.

Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.


“I’d like a Bosch bike!” This is what bicycle dealers hear several times a day from new customers – and it’s the biggest mistake you can make when buying an ebike. Sure, the motor is important. However, you don’t buy a car just because of its engine. If you want to be happy with your eMTB in the long term, you have to consider a bike as an overall concept. This group test will help you to find out which bike is best for which type of rider, terrain, and riding style. The motors of the big names in the industry all work extremely well, but differ in their purpose and functionality.


E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque, and others, like Bosch’s Active Line, are nearly silent. But, generally, all four make good options. Look for motor output (in torque), which will give you an idea of total power. Just like car engines, more torque equals more power off the line and more boost to your pedaling. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a more important figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a more accurate reflection of power (higher Wh equals bigger range).
As someone who owns both a Quest and Rift S I think this article misses the mark in a few areas: While the Quest technically has a higher resolution, it is a pentile display and as such is is more prone to godrays, glare and SDE. The overall resolution of the Rift S is lower but it has an RGB stripe display with more subpixels so side by side it actually looks sharper. Quest has 4 tracking cameras, Rift S has 5 so the overall area it can scan is greater and this makes a difference, especially in games where you lift your arms up and above your head. In order to move the data over the USB C wire the image will be compressed at the sides so it won't be as sharp or well defined as what you will see in the Rift S. In my experience, the Rift S refresh rate of 80hz is really the bottom end for comfortable VR experiences. When playing games that support cross buy or watching videos, I still experience discomfort on the Quest (especially during fast movement) whereas the same content feels perfect comfortable on my Rift S and even PSVR. This is more of a personal preference thing but I find the Rift S halo design far, far more comfortable to extended sessions that the Quest scuba mask design. So while it's impressive that the Quest will soon become a hybrid VR headset, let's not get carried away and just ignore its shortcomings and limitations. For the best PCVR experience a dedicated PCVR headset is still the way to go.

The MULE is the absolute BEST hunting ebike on the market! The "torque sensing" Bafang Ultra mid-drive motor certainly sets it apart from it's competition but the air suspension, hill climbing, small front chain ring and large rear cassette gearing, wide handlebars, locking grips, aggressive wide pedals, large 203 rotors and hydraulic brakes, Maxxis Minion tires with puncture proof lining placed between the tube and tire is what makes it so comfortable, safe, functional, and fun to ride.   Stand over height of 26 inches.
E-enduro bikes aren’t as different to regular bikes as one might imagine. All of the fundamentals are the same and by nailing the geometry and sizing Vitus has produced an amazing e-bike with the E-Sommet VR.Sure there are a couple of little things we’d probably change, like the STEPS Di2 mode shifter and rear tyre, but that’s about it. And given how much cheaper the Vitus is compared to the competition, you can easily afford to make these changes and even buy a spare battery. The E-Sommet VR is no golf buggy, but Vitus has it’s certainly hit a hole in one with this bike.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs. How do you ride an electric mountain bike?
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