I’m sure the can of worms has already been opened on this subject… Oh it’s motor bike blah blah they should be banned, is this whining mostly from strava whippets who’s times might be beaten? I raced motocross for 12 years & they are motorcycles with a internal combustion engine and yes they do make a mess of the country side but on land that has been allowed & nowadays has planning permission to be used for such events.
Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike - The build quality, however, is generally fantastic. It feels sturdy and strong, the clip to hold the fold in place never feels like it’s coming loose and the wheels feel like they can conquer anything. Also the suspension system is quite impressive and isn’t even included on the non-folding Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike. This suspension system and the strong frame help give the Ancheer the ability to comfortably hold riders who weigh up to 150kg (330 lbs).
A couple of weeks in, I had a wreck (brakes were mounted reverse of what I'm used to; front wheel locked up during a turn). The half-throttle/light/horn assembly was damaged beyond repair. Emailed the official company account and the supposed owners' account several times; no response. I had to buy a near-identical part from a Chinese company and re-wire it myself.
Firstly this is not a motorcycle. I bought this to use as a daily commuter.I now have 1000 + miles on it. The pedal assist works fine and may be ok for leisurely riding but I just use the throttle and pedal. This is a great bike. Strong frame and wheels. Been in two crashes and no damage. The tires are nice off road tires and now live on my daughters mountain bike. I switched them out for high pressure road tires. Forget about the horn and light. They don't work. I am 6'1" 32" inseam and had to buy a longer seatpost($30) to fit this frame. 13miles each way commute. Battery life is fine. After the 26 mile round trip it has a little juice left but not enough for another ride to work. I would buy again.
To fit it, a shorter handlebar grip is supplied and you'll have to unscrew the battery mounting plate from the down tube and the black box of wires which hangs behind the seat post. And if you fancy a bit of extra speed, you can unplug the white wire which limits the motor to the EU-regulated 15.5mph. This gives you a few extra mph that'll let you cruise at a comfortable 20mph.
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
Why We Like It: Razor is a name to be reckoned with in the industry, and the Razor EcoSmart Metro is highly rated online, like a lot of their products. This model gets a spot on our rankings thanks to its great build quality and nice top speed. It doesn’t hurt that it’s affordable and from a trusted brand as well. It has a max speed of 18 miles per hour, a powerful 500 W motor and it delivers 40 minutes of continuous use.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs.
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
The extra grip a 50lb e-bike normally helps to prevent overshooting corners when on the brakes, and bring pure DH-bike-like fun factor on the steepest trails. This electric Orange, however, rides more like a ‘standard’ enduro bike with a motor, which could be good or bad, depending on your expectations and riding style. It’s built tough and delivers stacks of fun in less time than any regular bike can. Adding a motor hasn’t upset Orange’s superb geometry.
SERVICE AVAILABLE --- With one-year warranty for the electric motor, battery and other parts except for frame, no worry about using it. This bicycle arrives 85% assembled. It's not hard to finish aseembly by yourself. The assembly service on this page is provided and charged by Amazon’s third-party company, if you can't finish by yourself, click on the “Select Assembly ” button above; choose "Ship to store for assembly and pick up". 

M8 has had a cube with the Bosch motor, reduced from Europe but a solid spec & loves it, been cycling more because of it. It definitely brings a smile to your face, laughing at climbs that you’d normally slog up. Horrible muddy trails become a motocross frenzy, balance being more the issue than grip or momentum. He’s happy to lend it on rides, so three of us all different sizes, jump on it & it doesn’t mater that it not set up for you, the motor makes up for any details
Not sure if there’s any in Southampton but there’s a couple of specialist electric bike shops in the Brighton area that sell them and they seem happy to let people do test rides. Probably the best way to decide if they’re the right thing for you and what you want to do. Would happily accompany you for a ride round Stanmer if you came over this way for a test.
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
What i’d really like is the ability to custom tune the standard speed settings with regard to the torque curve/output and perhaps have a top speed of 18mph or thereabouts, back when i could ride a normal bike under my own steam there were some sections of my local trails where i could easily maintain 20mph+ through the single track (allowing for acceleration out of the corners) as it was on a slight fall line. It’s all brain-farts at the moment so the tuning kit is still in my toolbox and it may stay in there.
When it comes to the distance it can cover at a single charge, it really depends. For instance, if you live 13 miles from work and ride on a smooth, flat pavement, the bike has enough power to get you home. The battery level does decrease when the motor is under increased stress—like when you’re riding up a hilly terrain—but it quickly levels itself when you go back riding on a flat road surface.
Chip them, & your asking for a world of potential legal trouble if your evolved in an accident & giving fuel to those ppl frothing at the mouth for (all) MTB’s to be banned from share trails. That said if it’s chipped it shouldn’t be on legal MTB trails, as there classed as basically motorbikes (very simple overview), so suggesting you only use the ‘dongle’ off-road argument falls flat on its face
Yep, there’s no getting away from the fact that i’m peddling a 21kg bike when the assist is switched off but with the massive battery & range there is no real need to switch it off, I can barely turn the pedals on a normal bike when i hit a hill so if i’m on the road and wanting as much range as possible to explore a few of the surrounding trails in my area of Galloway i’m quite happy using the eco mode to get myself around, the tour mode gives a bit more assist and is enough to tackle the majority of single track climbs with effort from myself, the sport mode is enough for all but the steepest of singletrack use and the turbo mode is just batshit mental for all out super steep climbs and so much fun.
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The fit is a little rough for me. I'm tall, about 73 inches, and I feel like the bike is small. I've ridden a few dozen miles to include a trip with a kids trailer towed behind, and it hasn't been really uncomfortable, but a little cramped compared to my Schwinn Trailway 28"/700c hybrid bike. Seat adjusts up but feels tilted back a little more than I would like. I have ridden in shorts and tshirt to the beach as well as khakis and a button up with backpack to work, ok comfort both ways. Perhaps it will just take some time to get used to.
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