I’m overwhelmed by all the options available. My wife and I would like to go to e-biking. Both age 72. Wife has arthritis and needs hydraulic brakes. I have no preference. At a minimum front suspension. Also would prefer a bike on the lighter side for both of us. Step thru is a necessity since our agility is waning. Front and rear lights with fenders. Very difficult to decipher quality, pricing, and reputation with so many mfgs. Pricing seems to be all over the map. Can you provide a recommendation for quality e-bikes less than $1000 with the options I mentioned above.
Electric mountain bikes have gained a lot of attention for their ability to help riders go higher, further, and faster on the trail. Several impressive new eMTB models have hit the market in recent years, making it easier than ever to head off-road. Our favorite is the Haibike SDURO HardNine, which comes equipped with a 350-watt Bosch Performance CX drive and a 500 watt-hour battery. This gives it a range of up to 70 miles, along with a top speed of 20 mph, which is plenty fast on singletrack.
Specialized has e-bikes figured out. Its e-bikes are better looking and better sorted than almost anything else. This Turbo Levo has a clean interface: just a mode switch and a few LEDs for status. To dig deeper, you use Specialized’s Misson Control app, which lets the user customize the motor’s tune, and has a clever Smart Control mode. This mode lets the rider set and time or distance, and the amount of reserve they want to be left over. The app then automatically adjusts the motor’s output to meet those settings, reducing battery anxiety. The custom motor is extremely smooth and quiet, with awesome torque. We found the highest mode too powerful for finesse riding, but great for flying up smooth climbs and cutting time off transfers. The e-bike tuned RockShox fork is somewhat harsh, but the rest of the parts are excellent and suit the bike’s capabilities—something we can’t say that about every e-bike.
Another important element is the primary user interface or the controls. It should be user-friendly so that the rider can navigate the features easily. A straightforward control panel should not include anything more than a small, digital display with clear readings, ergonomic thumb shifters, and a charging connection. In fact, a thumb shifter is even better than electronic buttons, although some riders may disagree.
The bike has three speed modes: low, medium and high. The top speed is about 18 miles with motor only and 25 mph with pedaling. The range you can get out of the motor is about 30 miles, but since you can pedal it just like the traditional bike after the battery dies, there is really no limit to how far you can go.  21-speed gear shift system allows you to be in full control of your ride, and front and rear disc brakes protect your safety. The Ancheer electric mountain bike is also equipped with LED headlight and horn.

Before we get into the review, we would like to tell you about our new print edition. Consisting of around 240 (!) pages, the 2019 E-MOUNTAINBIKE Print Editon offers a ton of inspiration, buyers advice, and eMTB know-how as well as reviews of the hottest bikes of the year. Our premium magazine is aimed at experienced eMTBers and beginners alike. Click here for more information (new window) or order it directly in our shop or on Amazon.de!
Scott’s Genius eRIDE 920 is another bike with Shimano’s excellent Steps E8000 motor. The narrow width of this motor—same as a standard Shimano mountain bike crank—is a nice feature, as is the support and customization offered by Shimano’s e-Tube apps. Boost mode lets you cruise comfortably at up to 20 miles per hour on pavement, while Trail mode doles out torque more smoothly and increases range. But compared to the Bosch in e-mtb mode (comparable to Shimano's Trail mode), Shimano’s faster and harder-hitting torque is less desirable for navigating technical terrain. The 29-inch wheels and 150mm of travel provide the ability to straight-line some really gnarly stuff. This bike is meant for riding big and riding hard. The big travel, long trail, and slack head angle give you a bike that loves to go straight and gobble up rowdy trails. And despite being such a long bike, it still handles technical terrain well.
The Remote CTRL is a playful ride that’s great for varied trails with rock gardens and flow sections, and that excels on fast trails with steep, punchy climbs and tight, twisty descents. It isn’t just for riders who may need a little assistance; the E-MTB mode creates an organic riding experience that allows you to take the skills you already have and ride faster and harder. It has a 150mm RockShox Yari fork and a 132mm RockShox Monarch Plus R shock with good mid-stroke support and a progressive finish to help prevent bottoming out on big hits. The 27.5x2.8-inch Maxxis Recon tires offer plenty of traction and also help to absorb smaller hits. The Remote CTRL's excellent Bosch motor accelerates smoothly to be more manageable when pedaling through rocky sections and has more oomph at low cadence than other motors, so you can more easily ride out of tough situations if you get bogged down.

The class 3 Aventon Pace 500 urban e-bike has five levels of pedal assist and tops out at 28 mph. But the Pace has something not found on a lot of modern e-bikes. In addition to pedal power, it also has a throttle—in the case of the Pace, a small thumb paddle on the left side of the handlebar next to the control unit that holds at a steady 20 mph, no pedaling required. The bike itself has an aluminum frame, a swept-back handlebar, ergo grips, a sturdy kickstand, hydraulic disc brakes, 8-speed Shimano Altus shifting and gearing, 27.5x2.2-inch Kenda e-bike-rated tires, a saddle the size of Texas, and good ol’ classic city/commuter-bike geometry. It doesn’t come equipped with fenders or a rear rack, but you can add them. Power comes in the form of a 500-watt rear-hub motor, a semi-integrated battery on the down tube (with a range of up to 50 miles), and a backlit display unit mounted on the stem.

Being value-conscious is something that one must keep in mind when buying an electric bike. Sometimes the most expensive isn’t the best and neither is a cheap one the best value for the money. In order to make sure that you are getting your money’s worth, one must consider many other things such as dependability, convenience and other things that will determine whether the bike is really worth getting.


Ghost’s Hybride SL AMR X S 7.7+ LC boasts almost as many unique characteristics as its name suggests, offering riders a middle- to high-end platform that’s also the recipient of a Design & Innovation Award for 2019. For those who spend their lives on the rugged trails, the SLAMR is outfitted with a gratuitous 140mm rear suspension, a 160mm RockShox Lyrik RCT3 Dual-Piston Air fork, a modest mixture of dependable SRAM and Shimano peripherals. Like most of the bikes on this list, you’ll find an industry-standard Shimano Steps 8000 motor as the centerpiece, providing lightweight, but capable assistance that helps to shed new light on your favorite trails. When it comes to wheels, you’ll find a set of DT Swiss’ attractive H-series adorning the front and rear, offering strength and resilience to riders who want the best of both worlds, without adding unwarranted weight.
Being value-conscious is something that one must keep in mind when buying an electric bike. Sometimes the most expensive isn’t the best and neither is a cheap one the best value for the money. In order to make sure that you are getting your money’s worth, one must consider many other things such as dependability, convenience and other things that will determine whether the bike is really worth getting.
This is a question the designers and engineers of the FOCUS and BULLS bikes of this group test asked themselves. Instead of speccing them with the standard 500 Wh batteries, both have developed a sophisticated alternative. The idea: instead of riding around with unnecessarily large batteries and unnecessary weight on short tours, they integrated a smaller 375 Wh or 378 Wh battery into the bike. If you don’t have enough power for long loops, you can double the range of both bikes with an additional battery for up to a full 750 Wh. While the second battery is mounted in the front triangle of the FOCUS, it disappears sideways in the downtube of the BULLS. In practice, you’ll need the second battery relatively often with both bikes, and in either case, you should consider the additional € 499 investment in a second battery pack when you buy the bike.
The frame is constructed of 6061 aluminum that’s more responsive with some bit of flex to it. A step-thru design makes getting on and off a breeze. The frame supports a more upright posture for improved comfort and visibility. A front fork suspension and rear spring suspension make for a smooth ride on uneven surfaces. It actually adds an aggressive look to the overall design.
Our team of experienced testers rode them for weeks on our local trails—everything from flow trails, to technical singletrack, to our enduro courses. We self-shuttled DH runs and hit the bike path. To understand the differences between them, we rode them back to back on similar trails. We tested them against standard bikes on the same trails in the same conditions. And to evaluate their range, we charged them all and ran them on full power until their batteries flickered and died.
It's finally here: The 2019 E-MOUNTAINBIKE Print Edition, our timeless annual issue! Consisting of around 240 (!) pages, the 2019 E-MOUNTAINBIKE Print Editon offers a ton of inspiration, buyers advice, and eMTB know-how as well as reviews of the hottest bikes of the year. Our premium magazine is aimed at experienced eMTBers and beginners alike. Click here for more information (new window) or order it directly in our shop or on Amazon.de!
Haibike ships the HardNine with 29-inch tires, 180-millimeter hydraulic disc brakes, a 100-millimeter front suspension fork, and a nine-speed Shimano shifting system. The bike’s LCD readout is affixed to the handlebars and displays the current speed, level of charge, remaining range, and current pedal assist mode. The company says the battery can be completely recharged in just four hours, minimizing downtime between rides.
The RadCity is a bike that’s been optimized to help you conquer the urban landscape. A big 48V battery gives you an estimated range of between 25 and 45 miles of e-assist from the 750-watt motor, which packs enough acceleration to get you out of dicey situations in traffic. There’s also a wattmeter to help you manage your power consumption on the LCD display. A welded-on rear rack holds up to 60 pounds of cargo, and puncture-resistant Kenda K-Rad tires keep you rolling over precarious debris. Commuting essentials include lights (the tail light also functions as a brake light), fenders, and a rear-mount kickstand.
It is a great e-bike which has a PAS feature. This means, that the bike is secure enough for riding for beginners and the motor is adjustable to your needs. It is a lightweight and simple e-bike.  The price is really astonishing for normal size electric bicycle. Another thing to mention Jasscol has disc brakes which are not so common on cheap bicycles. Read the full review here. 

It used to be you’d have to shell out a pretty penny to grab a piece of the e-bike fun. And while high-priced models still and always will exist—you can own a Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo mountain bike for a mere 12 grand—there are now some very affordable options that weren’t available a year ago. If you’re in it more for the fun than you are for high performance, you likely won’t notice where that extra money is being saved. For example, every bike on this list uses a hub-drive motor versus a mid-drive type, is designed with less integration (think battery and lights), mixes in some lower-quality parts, and has a top speed of 20 mph (save for the Aventon Pace 500 that boosts up to 28 mph). The trade-off: Every bike on this list—save the $1,699, which we included for its relatively high value—is sub-$1,500. Here’s what you’ll typically get with an e-bike in this price range.
When it comes to getting around in rough terrain all while not disturbing the wildlife, QuietKat bikes will get the job done!  With a large selection of fat tire electric bikes built specifically for hunting to choose from, it won't be hard for you to find one that fit your needs. So if you enjoy hunting, camping, or simply riding off the trail, one of these bikes will be perfect for you. Designed to carry heavy loads, these bikes are perfect for installing trail cameras or simply scouting the landscape. 
The charts below show our recommended sizes based on height, but there are some other factors, like arm and leg length, that determine a great fit. That’s why you’ll see some overlap in our recommendations. Not every rider who’s 5´8˝, for example, will fit on the same size bike. The best way to find your perfect fit is to consult the experts at your local Trek retailer.
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