Cannondale has electrified a significant chunk of its bicycle lineup, and now it's determined to conquer the mountain biking world in earnest. The company has unveiled a redesigned Moterra e-bike for the harsher climbs and a brand new Habit NEO (below) that's designed for "fast and flowy" rides -- say, a trip through a winding forest instead of an arduous hill climb. Both bikes aim to make electric riding easier than before, including through raw power.
There is no suspension, so the fat bike is not ideal for downhill. Also, you will feel more shocks than usual while doing large drops or crossing big tree roots. The fat tires are helpful for keeping it accurate and quick on sand and snow but don’t run it on ice. The tires simply don’t have enough traction to stay steady on ice. Studded tires may solve the problem but the safer option to steer clear of icy tracks.
E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque, and others, like Bosch’s Active Line, are nearly silent. But, generally, all four make good options. Look for motor output (in torque), which will give you an idea of total power. Just like car engines, more torque equals more power off the line and more boost to your pedaling. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a more important figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a more accurate reflection of power (higher Wh equals bigger range).
Electric bikes are here in a big way. Liberated from some of the normal constraints of standard bike design like weight and gearing, e-bike design has exploded; if you can imagine it, someone has built it. From cargo bikes to city bikes, messenger bikes to mountain bikes, road bikes, folding bikes, and even beach cruisers, there is something for everyone. The beauty of e-bikes is that they make the joy of cycling accessible to so many people in so many ways. See at-a-glance reviews below of five of our top-rated e-bikes, or scroll deeper for full reviews of these and other high-ranking options, plus more buying info.

Ancheer has become an icon in electric bikes and this mountain bike has earned itself a spot as the best electric mountain bike to ever grace the market. The electric bike comes equipped with a 250 Wat motor and a 36-Volt removable battery that pushes this bike to the extreme. It has an amazing pedal assist functionality which makes it an excellent bike for outdoor and leisure riding.
Additionally, it features the Shimano 7-speed shifting system, making it easier to attain a higher speed. It is a reliable bike with two working modes. With this, you can pedal it whenever it runs out of power. The powerful e-bike is able to move at a speed of 32km/h and can move for 22-28 miles on a single charge. The padded and comfortable saddle is easily adjustable for your riding height. You can also adjust the handlebars for a more comfy ride.

The Mule 1000 & Storm 1000 both come in 17" and 19" frame size options so you should be able to find the right sixe for you both. The 17" frame is best suited for heights ranging from 5’2" to 5’8" and the 19" frame for 5’8" and above. BackCountry eBikes are the makers or both models you like and they are hunters based out in Ogden Utah and they don’t make average bikes, they focus on elite hunting bikes that will get the job done. They are designed to take a beating a perform well doing so. Both models have that coveted ULTRA mid drive motor so climbing hills and tackling rough terrain offroad will be a joy to experience.
In fact, the manufacturers have already proven that what makes an e-MTB outstanding is not that much different to a regular MTB. Sure, there are slight differences in performance due to e-MTB’s heavier frame but both types share almost similar basics covering geometry, sizing, and balance. Also, the power-supplying motor comes into the forefront instead of the suspension in these bikes.
While falling gas prices have temporarily halted years of gains in the number of bicycle commuters, more and more of us are using the bicycle to get around. It’s economical, provides good exercise, and is much cheaper than owning a car. But unless you’re in really good shape, you aren’t going to get very far. Enter the electric bike: a glorious new contraption that lets you get around without having to worry about arriving at your destinations a sweaty mess.

Folding Electric Bikes- These are mostly used when people need to combine different modes of transport. For example, if you need first to take the train or bus, a folding e-bike can be useful to carry along. Also, very short trips are more convenient with these electric bikes, since you don’t need to bother tying them up. Typically, these are very light, even with the motor and battery. 
The Remote CTRL is a playful ride that’s great for varied trails with rock gardens and flow sections, and that excels on fast trails with steep, punchy climbs and tight, twisty descents. It isn’t just for riders who may need a little assistance; the E-MTB mode creates an organic riding experience that allows you to take the skills you already have and ride faster and harder. It has a 150mm RockShox Yari fork and a 132mm RockShox Monarch Plus R shock with good mid-stroke support and a progressive finish to help prevent bottoming out on big hits. The 27.5x2.8-inch Maxxis Recon tires offer plenty of traction and also help to absorb smaller hits. The Remote CTRL's excellent Bosch motor accelerates smoothly to be more manageable when pedaling through rocky sections and has more oomph at low cadence than other motors, so you can more easily ride out of tough situations if you get bogged down.
At $1,300, the Schwinn Monroe 250 started life a bit too pricey for what you got—a low-end, singlespeed e-bike—but at the current Wal-Mart price of $798, it’s become a steal. We’ve had one in for testing for a few months now: It feels heavy and sturdy, and you do notice the bulky down tube battery while cornering. The brakes are more of a suggestion at high speeds, and we wouldn’t suggest sustained climbing (we damaged a previous test bike’s motor on a group ride). But for pedaling on mostly flat roads, the Monroe 250 gives you 50 or more miles of e-assisted cruising.
The aluminum, step-through eJoy is the happy medium between traditional-looking townies that don’t transport much more than the rider and often-cumbersome cargo models that are challenging to store. With 26-inch wheels, full fenders, a Shimano Alivio nine-speed drivetrain and disc brakes, a wheelbase similar to the average townie, and a big, comfy seat, it has the appearance of a practical everyday cruiser. But its oversize rear rack, silent Bosch Active Line motor, heavy-duty head tube with front-tray mounts (the tray is an add-on), integrated Supernova E3 lights, and roll-over-anything balloon tires hurtle it into hmm-this-could-actually-replace-my-car status. It’s one of the quietest, most convenient, most stylish, and easiest-to-operate e-bikes available.
Before we get into the review, we would like to tell you about our new print edition. Consisting of around 240 (!) pages, the 2019 E-MOUNTAINBIKE Print Editon offers a ton of inspiration, buyers advice, and eMTB know-how as well as reviews of the hottest bikes of the year. Our premium magazine is aimed at experienced eMTBers and beginners alike. Click here for more information (new window) or order it directly in our shop or on Amazon.de! 

I received my ALL TERRAIN 750 right before my month long Colorado archery deer and elk hunt. I was able to quietly get in to places in 15 minutes that used to take me over an hour to hike in! If you are a serious hunter that wants to get away from the crowds to hunt then you NEED one of these bikes. I did a ton of research and comparing and M2S hands down has the best bike / customer service for the price, period!

Unlike the manual mountain bikes where you would have to fully rely on pedaling, electric mountain bikes depend on an electric charge. As expected, the bike has a battery, which often determines how far one can go on a single charge. A good electric mountain bike should have a good storage capacity. Although most mountain bikes have nearly the same battery storage capacity, it is not uncommon to find one that falls below par. It is also good to know how it performs and uses the battery under different weather conditions terrain and depending on the rider’s weight.

More and more people are switching to electric bikes for a lot of practical reasons. It provides convenience because you do not have to wait in traffic or look for the perfect parking spot. That saves you time and money for gas. As for health benefits, you can squeeze in some exercise and manually pedal your way to work then switch to the electric motor when you get tired.

Achesin electric mountain bike is designed with an ergonomic design that makes it very stable and easy to ride. Like most of the mountain bikes, this one is built with a good double-layered aluminum alloy wheel which makes it easy to maneuver, lightweight and durable. With its powerful motor and battery system, you can easily cover between 25 to 50 kilometers depending on the nature of the terrain.

I’m overwhelmed by all the options available. My wife and I would like to go to e-biking. Both age 72. Wife has arthritis and needs hydraulic brakes. I have no preference. At a minimum front suspension. Also would prefer a bike on the lighter side for both of us. Step thru is a necessity since our agility is waning. Front and rear lights with fenders. Very difficult to decipher quality, pricing, and reputation with so many mfgs. Pricing seems to be all over the map. Can you provide a recommendation for quality e-bikes less than $1000 with the options I mentioned above.


The motor is powerful enough to allow you to hit up to 35kmh on a 10.4ah battery that stays alive for 50km. With the fat Kenda tires and suspension fork, the bike does not need any pedal assistance to smoothly roll on even surfaces. The PAS provides five levels of assistance and even the first level is quite powerful. The fifth level will just blow you away with speed and torque and there is no way that you can pedal fast enough to meet any resistance.
In our head to head range test, the Rocky Mountain took the win by traveling 20 miles and 4,297 vertical feet. It is worth mentioning that our tester felt that he worked a little harder while range testing the Rocky Mountain than the other bikes we tested. The Giant wasn't far behind at 19.02 miles and 4,000 vertical feet, and the YT Decoy almost tied that with 19.01 miles and 4,039 vertical feet. The Specialized was nipping at their heels with 18.71 miles and 3,949 feet. The Ghost Hybride SL AMR was the least impressive with a range of just 16.75 miles and 3,559 vertical feet. The outlier in this comparison is the Bulls E-Stream with a 650Wh battery. We were not able to test the Bulls directly against these other competitors, but we did notice that you can ride it significantly farther than any of these other contenders. During one of our test rides, we rode the Bulls 24 miles and 4,500 vertical feet, and the battery still wasn't depleted. More battery storage equals longer rides; it's just that simple.
Trevor Porter, Kona's e-bike manager, said that motors can demand longer chainstays and adding batteries to downtubes can require larger headtubes, increasing stack height. This is common across the range of e-mtbs we tested. The reach and head tube angle tend to remain similar to standard bikes, but the chainstay length, head tube length, and stack height are generally increased.
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years. 

After you decide which style of e-bike you want, consider the class. In the U.S., there are three classes defined by the type of assist and how fast the motor will propel you. Most electric bikes sold are class 1 or 3. Class 1 bikes have a motor (max 750w) that assists while you’re pedaling, up to 20 mph. Class 3, also known as “speed pedelec,” can also have up to a 750w motor, but it can assist you up to 28 mph. Both are allowed in most states and cities without requiring a license. Class 2 models have throttles that don’t require the rider to pedal in order to get a boost. They’re allowed on most streets, bike lanes, and paths, but are less popular than the other classes and not covered much here (because not only do we still love to pedal, we also prefer the greater distances that pedal-assist bikes can cover).
Its quiet motor is perfect for coming up on a kill without scaring animals away. You can travel up to 19 MPH on this bike, which means you’re not breaking a sweat zipping on and off roads (which is great for animals sensitive to human aromas). Not only that, but it can carry up to 300 lbs, which is great for hauling your hunt in without a car or dirt bike. At only 66lbs, the Rambo R750XP is one of the lightest yet hardest performing e-bikes we’ve seen- definitely consider this bike if you plan on carrying lots around with you on your next trip.
This duo of battery and motor will give you a maximum speed of 19 MPH unassisted and a range of 20 miles without pedaling.  A bright digital display will help you to keep up with your distance and speed along with the current battery level.  A thumb throttle makes driving this fat tire electric hunting bike fun and easy.  This bike has a maximum carrying capacity of 300 pounds which is perfect for the avid hunter. 
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs.
This combination will give you a maximum unassisted speed of up to 19 MPH. Carrying a lot of gear will not be an issue with this eBike because it has a 300 pound weight capacity. This model also comes with an easy to read digital display that will give you better control of your eBike. Available in two different colors, black or camo will give hunters more options to choose from. 
One of the primary purposes of an e-bike is transferring power from the motor to the drivetrain to "support" your regular pedal stroke. All of the different drive units do this in relatively the same way, although subtle differences in their power output make them all feel slightly different. It is important to note that all of these systems work pretty well; the differences between them are relatively subtle but noticeable. We tested this metric primarily based on feel, as opposed to any sort of scientific measurement, and our testers could all notice the differences between the various models. All of the e-bikes we tested have several support modes offering varying levels of pedal assist support.
The kind of motor that is found in the electric bike is one consideration to look out for when buying the bike. Here is a very powerful and convenient E-bike that delivers great speed. This is because the bike is powered by the 350W high-speed motor. Apart from this, it has 10Ah lithium-ion battery, which provides a longer runtime; hence the best pick for you.
The bikes we tested all use a different e-bike motor system, and the controls, the primary user interface, are an important element we rated but didn't weight as heavily as some of the others. Each motor system and its associated controls are slightly different. Our primary interest is in how user-friendly is it to interact with the system, how intuitive and ergonomic are the shifters, how good and easy to read is the display, and how easy is it to charge the battery? Each drive system also has a smartphone app that is intended to allow the user to fine-tune the motor's support settings, create custom settings, monitor battery charge and health, and a whole lot more. We don't feel the apps are necessary for the use of any of these e-MTB's, but those with an affinity for technology or personalizing your ride may be inclined to use them.
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
The easy-to-operate throttle makes traveling at an exact speed a cinch, plus disc brakes on both the front and rear wheels offer the control you need to navigate tricky terrain. The seat is adjustable to accommodate various-sized riders. The lithium battery charger completely recharges an empty battery in 6 hours. QuietKat includes a lifetime warranty against defective workmanship for the frame. All other components have a one-year warranty.
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