Thanks to clever engineering, the Electric Brompton folds up identically to the non-powered variety. It is heavier than a standard Brompton of course, but quite light by e-bike standards. It has small , suitcase-style additional wheels that come into play once folded up, and the way the weight is balanced means it is quite straightforward to trundle along in that state.  
Although ebikes are easier to use in some instances, such as climbing hills, there are safety concerns. Because the bikes are heavier than traditional bikes, balance can be a problem. And, of course, ebikes allow people to cycle at higher speeds than usual. “A normal rider will average between 12 to 15 mph, where an ebike rider will average between 15 to 20 mph,” Abadie says. An increase in the number of deaths of elderly male ebike riders in the Netherlands has been attributed to their overconfidence in being able to ride at high speeds and to mount and dismount the bikes.

This bike impressed me right when I saw it. I love that Haibike offers spec-heavy options with the Yamaha PW system. I think the PW system gets a bad rep sometimes for being less powerful than the Bosch, but to be totally honest not everybody needs the power of a Bosch system. Haibike makes up for the lower torque of the PW system by offering a premium Shimano Deore XT drivetrain with 20 speeds. This is great for riders who want to stay in the action a bit more, but still not arrive sweaty and out of breath.
As electric bike options continue to expand, more brands are integrating the battery more seamlessly. That makes them look sleeker (and more like a real bike). Batteries are expensive, so make sure there's a good way lock the battery to your bike if you'll be keeping it outside. Overall weight is important. Some battery and motors can add 15 pounds or more to the bike. With assist, you won't feel that much when you're riding, but you will if you have to carry your bike up stairs or lift it onto a bike rack.
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