Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.
Seven batteries keep you powered without adding much bulk to the bike. These state-of-the-art lithium batteries are built to last up to 10 years. A single charge provides a range of 20 to 25 miles. It takes just 4 hours to reach full charge. The battery pack mounts to the frame and sits directly beneath the seat making it less noticeable. 300W motor with variable speed throttle provides powerful propulsion to achieve a speed of up to 20 mph.

There is no suspension, so the fat bike is not ideal for downhill. Also, you will feel more shocks than usual while doing large drops or crossing big tree roots. The fat tires are helpful for keeping it accurate and quick on sand and snow but don’t run it on ice. The tires simply don’t have enough traction to stay steady on ice. Studded tires may solve the problem but the safer option to steer clear of icy tracks.

There is a one year warranty, but it only covers some of the parts of the bike so you might want to consider still taking out your own insurance. The bike works like a pedal bike, an electric bike and a combination of both it is up to you and how you assemble it. The tires are strong and durable and built for rougher terrain and the charge time takes around four hours.
The demands for the best eMTB are high. It has to climb efficiently, be comfortable to ride, be very stable and composed, yet, on top of that, be a lot of fun on the descents. Also, its integration, ease of use, and motor performance must set the benchmark. Although all the motors perform at a high level, the Bosch Performance CX is unable to keep up with the competition due to the high internal resistance it generates at over 25 km/h. It’s a pity for the Moustache Samedi Race 11: it’s by far the best Bosch bike we’ve ever ridden, but it’s slowed down by the motor. With a price tag of € 5,999, the Trek Powerfly 9 LT Plus is clearly the cheapest bike in this group test. It climbs very efficiently, but is held back on the downhills by a poor choice of tyres and slow handling – you should consider a tyre upgrade in your budget. The Haibike XDURO Nduro descends with the stability of a freight train, but it has to let the competition overtake it when going back up. With its long 180 mm travel and high weight (24.54 kg), it even feels cumbersome on the downhills.
The bike looks a no different than a regular mountain bike. The 36 V, 8Ah Li-Ion battery is very cleverly designed and disguised as a thermos, so you will not be able to tell whether this is an e-bicycle or a regular one unless you get really close. It is very nicely build, and pretty sturdy; the frame is 100% alloy and the front fork is made with high-grade carbon steel. The bike itself weighs about 45 lbs.
Having been around the business of bowhunting for more than 40 years, I have seen some products, ideas and concepts come and go. A lot of them. Some of these things become important parts of bowhunting success for many archers, some find a small niche and move along with the growth of the industry, and, of course, some are relegated to the ash-heap of history.  The ones that survive seem to be products that fill a need.
In addition to this, it is easier to transport and store. It has a foldable design and with the lightweight design, you will find it more reliable. Other than this, the bike also features the Shimano 7-speed transmission system, which makes it elementary to shift the speed. The two-mode bike can function as an assisted bike and electric bike at the same time. It provides a longer runtime due to the 36V 8Ah lithium-ion battery.

Prodeco V5 Phantom X2 8 Speed Folding Electric Bicycle is constructed and tested in the USA. Travelling on a bike is sometimes very comfortable to get some fresh air. This bike is the one that is designed by keeping your needs in mind. It allows you to fold the bike in a compact form and can carry it in the office, basements, flats, etc. The Prodeco V5 Phantom X2 bicycle has avid BB7 disc brakes, 500-watt motor, 12Ah battery, and rigid frame. The manufacturers offer a lifetime warranty on the frame and 2 years on components.
Equipped with a high performance motor, this Ancheer Power Plus electric mountain bike has won accolades for its superior performance and unmatched reliability. It is built with a solid Aluminum alloy frame to keep it strong yet lightweight enough to maneuver with easily. It is everything one would want to get through any terrain and is excellent in every way imaginable.
Hello Guys! I am John Reese, a professional biker and my hobby is biking! I have been biking for last 6 years and I love using bikes while outing as well. Based on my experiences with the different type of bikes (mountain bikes, road bikes and hybrid bikes); I am sharing my opinion about various bikes so that a beginner can get started right away. Happy reading!

As long as you can do without some of the perks that pricier models offer—like a detailed display unit, integrated lights, and a torque-sensor motor—the August Live! LS is a solid, stable, comfortable, and really freakin’ cute (have you see those polka-dot fenders?) e-bike. Its 8-speed twist shifter, chopper-style handlebar, Touch Down Geometry (for a more laid-back ride), and three levels of assist keep this bike within the realm of “cruiser.” But with a 250-watt Bafang rear-hub motor, a top pedal-assisted speed of 20 mph, and reliable disc brakes, the August is no joke. It’ll get you to the top of relatively steep climbs without forcing you out of the saddle, and it feels super stable on the way back down. It has a battery range of 20 miles, but that’s enough to take it where it’s happiest: tootling along at the beach, around town, and through the park.
I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.
Having a motor bolted to the bottom of a mountain bike that provides pedal assistance is an amazing leveller. The constant torque it applies to the chain rounds out the squarest of pedalling actions, which in turn helps stabilizes the rear suspension and counter pedal induced bob, seamlessly shifting your focus from pedalling efficiency to battery life.
To help the rider find the perfect fit, the stem is adjustable. The bike also boasts dynamo powered lights alongside hydraulic disc brakes. The bike will suit riders from 4 ft 10 to 6 ft 5, and also integrates with a child seat. The total weight is 22.5kg, making it admittedly a fairly hefty folder – but that’s fairly uniform across electric versions.
As long as you can do without some of the perks that pricier models offer—like a detailed display unit, integrated lights, and a torque-sensor motor—the August Live! LS is a solid, stable, comfortable, and really freakin’ cute (have you seen those polka-dot fenders?) e-bike. Its 8-speed twist shifter, chopper-style handlebar, Touch Down Geometry (for a more laid-back ride), and three levels of assist keep this bike within the realm of “cruiser.” But with a 250-watt Bafang rear-hub motor, a top pedal-assisted speed of 20 mph, and reliable disc brakes, the August is no joke. It’ll get you to the top of relatively steep climbs without forcing you out of the saddle, and it feels super stable on the way back down, too. It has a battery range of 20 miles, but that’s enough to take it where it’s happiest: tooling along at the beach, around town, and through the park.

12 Month Financing: For a limited time, purchase $600 or more using the Amazon.com Store Card and pay no interest for 12 months on your entire order if paid in full in 12 months. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the promotional balance is not paid in full within 12 months. Minimum monthly payments required. Subject to credit approval. Apply now.
The RadCity is a bike that’s been optimized to help you conquer the urban landscape. A big 48V battery gives you an estimated range of between 25 and 45 miles of e-assist from the 750-watt motor, which packs enough acceleration to get you out of dicey situations in traffic. There’s also a wattmeter to help you manage your power consumption on the LCD display. A welded-on rear rack holds up to 60 pounds of cargo, and puncture-resistant Kenda K-Rad tires keep you rolling over precarious debris. Commuting essentials include lights (the tail light also functions as a brake light), fenders, and a rear-mount kickstand.
I’ve been wanting to get an electric hunting bike for a while but I’m curious about charging the batteries while out hunting. How long would I need to run a generator for to top off a battery? Would a solar panel even get the job done? Seems like extra batteries might make the most sense. How long would one of these batteries take to charge from empty?
The Swagcycle folding electric bike is a stylish and sturdy bike. With a single battery charge, you can reach up to 15 miles. This bike is an excellent choice for the cities and amazing countrysides. The Swagcycle folding electric bike weights only 16.8 kg, so it is not only powerful but lightweight also. Because it is a foldable electric bike, you can fit it almost everywhere. It allows you to save some space in your home. This electric bike has two modes: you can ride it on your own, or turn on the throttle mode and enjoy the riding without even pedaling hard!

While most games have a gameplay loop, developer Mobius Digital took this concept quite literally with the sci-fi adventure  The Outer Wilds . The game is built around a time loop, meaning you'll be exploring and discovering the world (or worlds) in 20-or-so minute runs.You know, I played this game for about two hours and did not experience anything like this. I didn't even get into a real spaceship. I gave up and moved on to something else. Also, honestly...a list like this should be conveying the message of Here's why you need to be playing on PC. This list wouldn't convince a lot of people to drop their Switch or PS4 controller, and outside of LoL, there is not a game on here you couldn't easily and more conveniently play on a phone or a console. Also, World of Warcraft should be on there. I know, it's 15 years old. There is still nothing else like it anywhere, warts and all.
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As long as you can do without some of the perks that pricier models offer—like a detailed display unit, integrated lights, and a torque-sensor motor—the August Live! LS is a solid, stable, comfortable, and really freakin’ cute (have you see those polka-dot fenders?) e-bike. Its 8-speed twist shifter, chopper-style handlebar, Touch Down Geometry (for a more laid-back ride), and three levels of assist keep this bike within the realm of “cruiser.” But with a 250-watt Bafang rear-hub motor, a top pedal-assisted speed of 20 mph, and reliable disc brakes, the August is no joke. It’ll get you to the top of relatively steep climbs without forcing you out of the saddle, and it feels super stable on the way back down. It has a battery range of 20 miles, but that’s enough to take it where it’s happiest: tootling along at the beach, around town, and through the park.
The motor is powerful enough to allow you to hit up to 35kmh on a 10.4ah battery that stays alive for 50km. With the fat Kenda tires and suspension fork, the bike does not need any pedal assistance to smoothly roll on even surfaces. The PAS provides five levels of assistance and even the first level is quite powerful. The fifth level will just blow you away with speed and torque and there is no way that you can pedal fast enough to meet any resistance.

Just like all Rambo models, this unit comes standard with a durable aluminum alloy 6061 frame.  This bike has an energy efficient 350-watt Bafang rear hub motor that is powered by a LG 36 volt 10.4AH battery.  The R35OJR comes in matte black and has a KT-LCD3 digital display that will allow you to keep up with important information such as the battery level. 


In fact, the manufacturers have already proven that what makes an e-MTB outstanding is not that much different to a regular MTB. Sure, there are slight differences in performance due to e-MTB’s heavier frame but both types share almost similar basics covering geometry, sizing, and balance. Also, the power-supplying motor comes into the forefront instead of the suspension in these bikes.

This eBike will help carry all your gear with a 300 pound load capacity. The Stalker 750 comes in two colors including Special Edition Kuiu Verde 2.0  and matte black.  Both colors schemes are perfect for staying concealed while out in the woods.  When you compare this 750-watt hunting eBike with other models on the market, you will see that it is superior in many different ways.  

Specialized has a celebrated history within the mountain biking scene, and they’ve elaborated on their well-rounded catalog with the addition of the Turbo Levo Comp. The Levo is a great alternative for those who are looking for all of the coveted characteristics of a proper trail bike, wrapped up with a slew of new, innovative technologies. Here, you’ll find a similar geometry to the company’s flagship Stumpjumper, albeit, with a redesigned alloy frame, improved kinematics, and internal cable routing to keep things nice and clean. In the bike’s most recent iteration, a Specialized 2.1 Rx trail-tuned motor has been implemented, providing instant engagement, unrivaled heat management, and consistent output throughout the Levo’s entire assisted range. When it comes to peripherals, a set of dependable SRAM accessories, a Praxis 2D cold-forged alloy crankset, and Roval Traverse 29 wheels round things out.
You can set the maximum speed at more than 20mph (but the legal limit is 20). Also, you should not cross that limit because the Shimano 7-gear transmission system won’t be able to cope up with anything higher than 22 to 23 mph. However, to the absolute joy of the thrill seekers, the huge weight of the bike can push the speed to go over 40 mph on downhill coasts. Be careful though and make sure that the road and traffic conditions allow that speed limit.

The Class 3 Aventon Pace 500 urban e-bike has five levels of pedal assist and tops out at 28 mph. But the Pace has something not found on a lot of modern e-bikes. In addition to pedal power, it also has a throttle—in the case of the Pace, a small thumb paddle on the left side of the handlebar next to the control unit that holds a steady 20 mph, no pedaling required. The bike itself has an aluminum frame, a swept-back handlebar, ergo grips, a sturdy kickstand, hydraulic disc brakes, 8-speed Shimano Altus shifting and gearing, 27.5x2.2-inch Kenda e-bike-rated tires, a saddle the size of Texas, and good ol’ classic city/commuter-bike geometry. It doesn’t come equipped with fenders or a rear rack, but you can add them. Power comes in the form of a 500-watt rear-hub motor and a semi-integrated battery on the down tube (with a range of up to 50 miles); a backlit display unit mounted on the stem shows your speed and distance and tells you how much juice you have left.
With a 500w motor powering this bike, you’ll be able to ride for up to 30 miles on the throttle alone (50 miles if you pedal). And while it may not pack a huge punch when it comes to speed, the torque on this motor can take hills, inclines, and rough terrain with ease. So when you’re tired of walking back and forth from the river but don’t need to zip back to camp in a flash, take a ride on the CIVI BIKES 500W Predator Electric Mountain Bike and start loving your trips even more.
E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque, and others, like Bosch’s Active Line, are nearly silent. But, generally, all four make good options. Look for motor output (in torque), which will give you an idea of total power. Just like car engines, more torque equals more power off the line and more boost to your pedaling. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a more important figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a more accurate reflection of power (higher Wh equals bigger range).
Pros versatile, fits water bottle, least e-bike looking, good battery life, low center of gravity Good controls, huge distance range, confidence inspiring at speed, good component spec Very nice build, stealthy looks, hard-charging downhill performance Reasonably priced, good distance range, well rounded performance, solid component spec Smooth and consistent power output, modern geometry,
As with anything, there is still room for improvement. There is no handlebar mounted digital display, and the only way to tell your speed is to mount a phone or bike computer to the bars. Specialized has changed the location of their battery charge and output mode display, however, which is now conveniently located on the top tube where you can see it while riding. The new motor is an improvement over the previous, but it still lags a little in engagement compared to the competition and the climbing performance is hampered by the drive unit's slightly more abrupt cutoff. Overall though, the Specialized still proved to be the test team's favorite for its versatility and well-rounded performance. We loved it, and we think you will too.
The Moterra Neo is one of the shorter travel e-bikes we've tested. It has a 140mm Rockshox Pike fork and 130mm of rear travel. That was enough travel to handle everything we encountered on the trail and the shorter travel was welcomed on less technical terrain. It uses a Bosch Performance Line CX motor with 500 Wh battery integrated into the downtube. In testing, we've found Bosch's E-MTB mode works very well, offering a quick and hearty kick when you need to accelerate quickly, but gentle assistance in tricky sections. The lower travel stopped the bike from bogging down in technical uphill rock gardens, making them easier to ride through, and the 160mm cranks also help to reduce pedal strikes so you can keep the power on. The agile handling and stable ride make it one of the easier e-bikes to adapt to, and one of the most versatile.

All Cannondale E-bikes have one thing in common — pure, visceral cycling performance. Our goal is to create bikes that are so rider-focused, so seamlessly integrated and so much damn fun to ride, that you forget you've got power assist, forget you're on an electric bike, forget everything except how good it feels to be on that bike, in that moment. If that sounds like your cup of tea, power up. Let's Ride.
The fit is a little rough for me. I'm tall, about 73 inches, and I feel like the bike is small. I've ridden a few dozen miles to include a trip with a kids trailer towed behind, and it hasn't been really uncomfortable, but a little cramped compared to my Schwinn Trailway 28"/700c hybrid bike. Seat adjusts up but feels tilted back a little more than I would like. I have ridden in shorts and tshirt to the beach as well as khakis and a button up with backpack to work, ok comfort both ways. Perhaps it will just take some time to get used to.
Received the Ancheer 250watt bike and my friend (bike fan and repair guy) has been riding it on flats and moderate hills here in So Cal. He made some initial adjustments, but so far … so good, 2 months in. I have no idea how long the battery will last (lifetime recharge 500 times ?) but hoping it will keep going. I have read many reviews on this ebike … and there is nothing consistent here. Everyone belongs to the good, bad, or ugly … category. I am looking for buyer reviews that have had the bike for more than 6 months. And there is really not much anyone can do except to ride it and see what happens. I have learned a lot on the way … for sure. My buddy now has a 350 watt Mtn ebike he is also testing out. Initially he was very happy with 250 watt, and did not want to buy a 350. But he is enjoying the wee bit more power … esp up hills. Thanks for your write up … as I can appreciate y,all input !!!
The motor is powerful enough to allow you to hit up to 35kmh on a 10.4ah battery that stays alive for 50km. With the fat Kenda tires and suspension fork, the bike does not need any pedal assistance to smoothly roll on even surfaces. The PAS provides five levels of assistance and even the first level is quite powerful. The fifth level will just blow you away with speed and torque and there is no way that you can pedal fast enough to meet any resistance.
The RadCity is a bike that’s been optimized to help you conquer the urban landscape. A big 48V battery gives you an estimated range of between 25 and 45 miles of e-assist from the 750-watt motor, which packs enough acceleration to get you out of dicey situations in traffic. There’s also a wattmeter to help you manage your power consumption on the LCD display. A welded-on rear rack holds up to 60 pounds of cargo, and puncture-resistant Kenda K-Rad tires keep you rolling over precarious debris. Commuting essentials include lights (the tail light also functions as a brake light), fenders, and a rear-mount kickstand.
Thanks for your excellent article. I’ve been riding ebike for about 16 years. My first electric bike was a Meridian pedal assist bike. I just up graded to a new bike. I’m 73, so I wanted a pedal assist bike that had a throttle. I researched for several months and bought what I think is the best bike for the money. It’s a Rad Rover 2017 fat bike. It has a 750 watt mother with a 48 volt 11.6 amp battery. It’s a fantastic bike, that is a lot of fun to ride. You might want to check it out and add it to your list of bikes. Rad Rover also make a city commuter bike, a cargo bike and a folding bike. You can’t beat their price for a quality bike. Thanks again for both of your articles. They were very informative.

Anybody can work on electric bikes, even you: No need to learn about compression or carburetor turning, replacing parts of an engine or even mixing fuel. Anyone who can work on pedal bikes can maintain an electric hunting bike- no special licensing or degree required. If you don’t know how to work on bikes, you can learn how to pretty quickly. Moreover, replacing parts like a controller or motor on an e-bike is much easier than changing the crank or cylinder on a gas-powered engine, so long-term maintenance is much easier, too.

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