With asthma, the commuter was just what I needed to get up these hills in the DC area without having an attack. With the 20 miles range, that gets me though my day, I can almost get about 35 miles in, since I only use the assist for hills, and I call any incline a hill. It came in two days, was very easy to install. I did it myself. It took me over an hour because I was scared, and watch the video over and over. Before I install this, I never did any work on my bike, not even changed a flat. When I do group rides, people notice that I'm no longer the last person up the hills and tell me to slow down! They are impressed that I was able to installed it myself. I brought this in Feb. 2017, had one problem with the on/off switch which customer service addressed, sent me a new switch and instructed me on how to install it myself. They actually sent two switches, other than that, I had no problems with it. Great customer service that stands behind their product, great product, equals happy customer.
All Kalkhoff bikes come with lots of extras: hub or motor powered front and rear lights, bells, fenders, chain guards and racks. Some include a built-in quick-lock or a rack-mounted pump. There are a number of features available for the discerning cyclist, whether it's the Magura hydraulic brakes, the B&M super-bright hub-powered headlight, the top-of-the-line Shimano internal hub or derailleurs or the three-layer powder-coated paint process.
The way they work is pretty simple: The motor kicks in with extra assist when you pedal, and there are different levels of assistance. That's it. Just turn it on, pedal, and go! You can also turn the assist mode off and ride it like a regular bike. And e-bikes stop assisting at a certain speed (in the U.S., it's 20 mph or 28 mph depending on class) for safety, of course.
Bulls electric bikes with Brose motors will always top the list for any long distance ride. Coming in with a huge 650 watt hour battery, Brose estimates that you can take these bikes over 100 miles on one charge easily. They also have 90 nm of torque, which will pop you right up hills even when you’ve got a full rack of gear in the front and the back.
The riding position is racy, and we suffered a numb left hand after 45 minutes of riding due to a combination of the Bullhorn bars and the narrow position adopted to cover the ‘sissy’ brakes in traffic (picking a flat bar model would be more practical for city commuting). The biggest drawback to the Soho is that on a single-speed the 15.5mph cut-off (for all e-bike motors in Europe) left us feeling like we’d been "deserted". Over the cut-off speed we found ourselves dragging that heavy back wheel with no alternate gears to reach for.
It’s impressive just how traditional a finish they’ve achieved for a pedal-assist bike, especially considering the motor uses Kinetic Energy Recovery to charge itself (like F1 Cars). Firing up the motor is achieved by back-pedaling three times (while travelling over 8mph). It’s a neat idea, and a clever way of doing away with those cables and switches, but in reality it’s fiddly. Riding in the city we occasionally felt ridiculous on a busy street pedaling backward rather than forward to kick off the assist. It’s also a chore getting the bike to speed and going through the motion to activate in tight spaces such as underground garages or on an incline.
The Soho is one of Coboc’s four single-speed pedal-assist bikes. The bikes are differentiated with finishing kit - handlebar style, bar-tape, saddle and paint finish. With a retro / bespoke styling with Bullhorn bars, Brooks fabric-tape and Cambium saddle and brushed aluminium frame, the Coboc is an e-bike for riders who don’t want to look like they’re riding an e-bike. The ONE Soho is for a rider that doesn’t want gears either.
BULLS never ceases to amaze. This full-suspension fat bike is fitted with a Bosch mid-drive motor for enhanced hill climbing. The 4-inch wide Schwalbe Jumbo Jim Snakeskin tires are genuinely monstrous. It's exquisitely designed and equipped with all the best components. As with all BULLS ebikes, the Monster E FS comes with a 2-year warranty and 5-years on the frame.
Running Errands, Getting Groceries, Replacing the mini-van: An electric cargo bicycle is a new breed of vehicle, half bicycle, half electric vehicle. The Mundo Cargo Utility Bicycle rides like a regular bike and gives you the capacity to haul at least 6 large bags of groceries. You can then save money, conserve resources, stay healthy, change your mobility, and transform your world.
The Moterra is Cannondale’s biggest and baddest e-mtb and just looking at this thing you can see that it’s built to withstand some wicked downhills and big drops. With 130mm of front and rear travel, paired up with 27.5-inch wheels and trail-grabbing 2.8-inch tires, along with a KS LEV Integra Dropper Post make this pedal-assist mountain bike a great option if you want to climb farther to shred longer, but don’t want to lug your bike uphill for ages. The 250w motor, placed slightly farther forward than most other bikes to optimize weight distribution and handling, will give you a nice boost so you can enjoy the ride up and not be too gassed when you get to the top. After all, it’s all about the ride down, right?

Forward-thinking parents are giving up thier SUVs and opting for electric cargo bikes for getting the family around. Cargo bikes are seeing a resurgence in popularity with the rise of electric conversion systems that convert these awesome people movers into family toting electric vehicles. One year ago the Wall Street Journal ran a full page article in their weekend edition entitled The New Station Wagon. Since then the trend for...


Back to the bike. I’ve gotta be honest, it doesn’t look half bad. The battery fits into the downtube, which is way better than those crazy brackets you see on cheap ebikes. The welds are also smoothed over, like an old Aluminum Cannondale. The drivetrain is a mix of parts, with Shimano Altus in the rear. Altus is a mountain bike groupset, but on the very low end.
An electric bicycle, also known as an e-bike, powerbike or booster bike, is a bicycle with an integrated electric motor which can be used for propulsion. Many kinds of e-bikes are available worldwide, from e-bikes that only have a small motor to assist the rider's pedal-power (i.e., pedelecs) to somewhat more powerful e-bikes which tend closer to moped-style functionality: all, however, retain the ability to be pedalled by the rider and are therefore not electric motorcycles.
Like the Currie, the Rayos has a lot of torque, independent human and electric drive systems, and a drive system that freewheels when not in use. The electronics shut the motor off at 80% battery discharge to avoid a full discharge (which really shortens the life of lead-acid batteries). The Rayos is an 8-speed bike that uses standard bike parts. Seats, handlebars, brakes and other non-electric parts can be found at a supercenter or bike store. Electric parts can be obtained from Rayos dealers.
Cargo bikes and city bikes are common in the e-bike space, but until recently we haven’t seen that many performance road bikes. The Giant Road E+1 is a pedal-assist performance road bike that’s made for more than just commuting; the powerful motor can rank you up to 28mph very quickly on the highest setting so you can rip the flats, join your local group ride, or blast through the mountains with far less effort than a traditional road bike. Don't expect it to feel like a 16lb race bike when you lean it into high-speed turns, but the endurance-oriented geometry allows for an aggressive position on the bike and keeps the it nimble and agile at high speed.
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