It is important to note that the less power output you use while riding your e-bike, the longer the battery will last, makes sense right? All of the pedal-assist drive units we tested also have smartphone apps that can be used to customize your support settings and such changes may allow for more or less range on your electric mountain bike. Specialized's Mission Control app has a feature that lets you set a predetermined route, and the app then regulates the motor's support to ensure power lasts to finish your ride.

Prodeco V5 Phantom X2 8 Speed Folding Electric Bicycle is constructed and tested in the USA. Travelling on a bike is sometimes very comfortable to get some fresh air. This bike is the one that is designed by keeping your needs in mind. It allows you to fold the bike in a compact form and can carry it in the office, basements, flats, etc. The Prodeco V5 Phantom X2 bicycle has avid BB7 disc brakes, 500-watt motor, 12Ah battery, and rigid frame. The manufacturers offer a lifetime warranty on the frame and 2 years on components.
Despite it's prodigious descending talents the short (426mm) chainstays make tight corners and lifting the front end easy. That also makes flying through flow trails and popping off rocks a staple of the Altitude's arsenal. With uncompromised suspension and geometry, a powerful motor and big battery, and excellent trail manners, the Rocky offers a compellingly unique e-package that performs well in all situations.
While most games have a gameplay loop, developer Mobius Digital took this concept quite literally with the sci-fi adventure  The Outer Wilds . The game is built around a time loop, meaning you'll be exploring and discovering the world (or worlds) in 20-or-so minute runs.You know, I played this game for about two hours and did not experience anything like this. I didn't even get into a real spaceship. I gave up and moved on to something else. Also, honestly...a list like this should be conveying the message of Here's why you need to be playing on PC. This list wouldn't convince a lot of people to drop their Switch or PS4 controller, and outside of LoL, there is not a game on here you couldn't easily and more conveniently play on a phone or a console. Also, World of Warcraft should be on there. I know, it's 15 years old. There is still nothing else like it anywhere, warts and all.
Prodeco V5 Phantom X Lite 9 Speed Folding Electric Bicycle is a lightweight and well-balanced bike that is suitable for all adventurers, campers, and sports enthusiasts. It gives an outstanding and smooth performance with a 300-watt motor. It is an eye-catching bike that looks fabulous in black color. Plus, you can carry it with you by simply folding it.
This is fantastic and, oddly, mindblowing to me.A decade ago I was working at a local college in IT, and one of the my duties was building/maintaining and monitoring the distance learning rooms, which were equipped with queued cameras tied directly to microphones on each desk, and blah blah blah, those classes connected via hardware codec to other classroom across the state (or in some cases, country) to broadcast a live class to multiple classrooms. Our head end had 30 hardware codecs, a 128in/128out AV router, and required a central bridge to connect multiple endpoints and designate the main source and corresponding layout. Dozens of miles of copper were spread around the campus tied to hundreds of miles of fiber connecting our satellite campuses, all costing literally millions of dollars to create.Now they can do it on Twitch with a basic internet connection and free software. In HD. Holy crap, I am an old man with an onion on my belt, but the progress we have made in a short amount of time is awesome.
As I said before, going up hills might require some pedaling, but it is SO MUCH EASIER with the motor running. I feel like a higher voltage is used on level 3 pedal assist than can be gotten just using the hand turn, though. It takes a few pedals for the pedal assist to kick in which can be annoying, but it does save some battery on initial acceleration. You also have to be careful pedaling around to park the bike or at a street corner waiting for traffic because you DO NOT want the motor to kick in and send you into a workbench or worse ... oncoming traffic.
To help the rider find the perfect fit, the stem is adjustable. The bike also boasts dynamo powered lights alongside hydraulic disc brakes. The bike will suit riders from 4 ft 10 to 6 ft 5, and also integrates with a child seat. The total weight is 22.5kg, making it admittedly a fairly hefty folder – but that’s fairly uniform across electric versions.
The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.
There's a lot to like about the Giant Trance E+ 2 Pro starting with its reasonable price. Electric mountain bikes are expensive, and the Trance E+ 2 comes in under $5K with a nice component specification. The build is one reason why this bike performs so well on the trail, with a beefy fork, plush suspension, meaty tires, and powerful brakes that can handle the heavy weight of this rig. It's also got a nice modern geometry that helps it perform very well on the descents while still maintaining reasonable climbing abilities. It has a 504Wh battery and proved to be one of the most efficient in using that power in our distance range testing. There's no lack of power on tap when you need it, and it delivers it smoothly with little motor noise. Giant finishes it all off with nice integration of the battery and motor into the frame design for a super clean look.
Over several months, our team of four professional mountain bike testers rode each of the electric mountain bikes in our test selection on a variety of trails and terrain in a range of weather conditions. We had each tester ride each of the bikes numerous times, often riding the different models back to back for the sake of comparison. We didn't go easy on them. Instead, we treated them all as if they were our own, putting them all through the wringer to identify their strengths and weaknesses. We scrutinized every aspect of each e-bike's performance and scored them all on several rating metrics, e-bike controls, downhill performance, uphill performance, power output, and distance range. Each of these metrics is described in greater detail below. It is important to note that during our testing, our impressions of these e-bikes changed dramatically. Our first impressions didn't exactly stick. It was essential for us to test the different models head-to-head and make direct comparisons to flush out the differences.
This eBike will help carry all your gear with a 300 pound load capacity. The Stalker 750 comes in two colors including Special Edition Kuiu Verde 2.0  and matte black.  Both colors schemes are perfect for staying concealed while out in the woods.  When you compare this 750-watt hunting eBike with other models on the market, you will see that it is superior in many different ways. 
The Hyper E-Ride Electric Bike is an excellent example of a great city commuter electric bike. It has several design features. The electric bike has a step-through frame which makes it very easy to step on and ride it. Also, the bike comes with fenders in the front and the back. To make it more a casual-riding bike in the city, the handlebars are swept back a little bit. The e-bike has a Rear Hub Brushless 36volt 250W motor and the top speed is 20 mph which is enough for a city e-bike. Battery charging time is 4 hours and the total running time is 1 hour which is about 20 miles.
Every bike on this list has been thoroughly evaluated and vetted by our team of test editors. We research the market, survey user reviews, speak with product managers and engineers, and use our own experience riding these bikes to determine the best options. Our team of experienced testers spent many hours and miles using these bikes for their intended purpose. We’ve commuted to and from work on them, used them to stock up on groceries and beer, tested their passenger-hauling capability, ridden them on questionable terrain to see how they handle, and run their batteries down to officially see how long they last on one charge. We evaluated them on performance, price, comfort, handling, value, reliability, fun, and overall e-factor to come up with this list of bikes that will best serve the needs of anyone looking to add a little pedal assist to their ride.
There is a one year warranty, but it only covers some of the parts of the bike so you might want to consider still taking out your own insurance. The bike works like a pedal bike, an electric bike and a combination of both it is up to you and how you assemble it. The tires are strong and durable and built for rougher terrain and the charge time takes around four hours.

A few days after receiving the bike I received an email from Homdox asking if everything arrived ok and how the bike was working out. I let them know about the broken handle on the gear shift and sent them pictures. They replied on the first business day that followed stating they'd send a replacement. So... impressions right now are good. Hopefully the part arrives quickly and is in fact the right part.


I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.
In order to make the final judgement of every bike as objective as possible, the test team includes ex-racers and engineers as well as amateur riders and eMTB newbies. Even if we explored the bikes’ performance on the trail to the limit, we attach as much importance to their everyday usability. A potent and balanced bike which shines on demanding singletrack and is fun to ride should ride just as well on more moderate trails. And even if you’re not taking yourself and your bike to the limit every time you ride, it’s good to know that the bike is prepared for any situation you might feel like throwing at it.
I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.
Our team of experienced testers rode them for weeks on our local trails—everything from flow trails, to technical singletrack, to our enduro courses. We self-shuttled DH runs and hit the bike path. To understand the differences between them, we rode them back to back on similar trails. We tested them against standard bikes on the same trails in the same conditions. And to evaluate their range, we charged them all and ran them on full power until their batteries flickered and died.
As someone who owns both a Quest and Rift S I think this article misses the mark in a few areas: While the Quest technically has a higher resolution, it is a pentile display and as such is is more prone to godrays, glare and SDE. The overall resolution of the Rift S is lower but it has an RGB stripe display with more subpixels so side by side it actually looks sharper. Quest has 4 tracking cameras, Rift S has 5 so the overall area it can scan is greater and this makes a difference, especially in games where you lift your arms up and above your head. In order to move the data over the USB C wire the image will be compressed at the sides so it won't be as sharp or well defined as what you will see in the Rift S. In my experience, the Rift S refresh rate of 80hz is really the bottom end for comfortable VR experiences. When playing games that support cross buy or watching videos, I still experience discomfort on the Quest (especially during fast movement) whereas the same content feels perfect comfortable on my Rift S and even PSVR. This is more of a personal preference thing but I find the Rift S halo design far, far more comfortable to extended sessions that the Quest scuba mask design. So while it's impressive that the Quest will soon become a hybrid VR headset, let's not get carried away and just ignore its shortcomings and limitations. For the best PCVR experience a dedicated PCVR headset is still the way to go.
The frame is solid. In fact too solid for me. The frame is thick with such a girth that my rear wheel bike rack doesn't fit (around the frame or into the pre-drilled holes because the disk brake is in the way). Shocks seem to work fine. I do enjoy having the kick stand further back, provides a lot more stabilization to the bike vice being closer to the pedals.
Specialized has e-bikes figured out. Its e-bikes are better looking and better sorted than almost anything else. This Turbo Levo has a clean interface: just a mode switch and a few LEDs for status. To dig deeper, you use Specialized’s Misson Control app, which lets the user customize the motor’s tune, and has a clever Smart Control mode. This mode lets the rider set and time or distance, and the amount of reserve they want to be left over. The app then automatically adjusts the motor’s output to meet those settings, reducing battery anxiety. The custom motor is extremely smooth and quiet, with awesome torque. We found the highest mode too powerful for finesse riding, but great for flying up smooth climbs and cutting time off transfers. The e-bike tuned RockShox fork is somewhat harsh, but the rest of the parts are excellent and suit the bike’s capabilities—something we can’t say that about every e-bike.
The Mule 1000 & Storm 1000 both come in 17" and 19" frame size options so you should be able to find the right sixe for you both. The 17" frame is best suited for heights ranging from 5’2" to 5’8" and the 19" frame for 5’8" and above. BackCountry eBikes are the makers or both models you like and they are hunters based out in Ogden Utah and they don’t make average bikes, they focus on elite hunting bikes that will get the job done. They are designed to take a beating a perform well doing so. Both models have that coveted ULTRA mid drive motor so climbing hills and tackling rough terrain offroad will be a joy to experience.
E-enduro bikes aren’t as different to regular bikes as one might imagine. All of the fundamentals are the same and by nailing the geometry and sizing Vitus has produced an amazing e-bike with the E-Sommet VR.Sure there are a couple of little things we’d probably change, like the STEPS Di2 mode shifter and rear tyre, but that’s about it. And given how much cheaper the Vitus is compared to the competition, you can easily afford to make these changes and even buy a spare battery. The E-Sommet VR is no golf buggy, but Vitus has it’s certainly hit a hole in one with this bike.
When you hear “electric bicycle” you normally don’t think off-road. Add to that the phrase “hunting” into the mix, and all of a sudden the idea of an “electric hunting bicycle” seems a little strange. We don’t blame you because when manufacturers started producing e-bikes decades ago that was certainly the case: any bit of moisture or debris could short even the most powerful electric bike motor back in the day. How are you supposed to hunt with something that can’t even go off-road?
Its quiet motor is perfect for coming up on a kill without scaring animals away. You can travel up to 19 MPH on this bike, which means you’re not breaking a sweat zipping on and off roads (which is great for animals sensitive to human aromas). Not only that, but it can carry up to 300 lbs, which is great for hauling your hunt in without a car or dirt bike. At only 66lbs, the Rambo R750XP is one of the lightest yet hardest performing e-bikes we’ve seen- definitely consider this bike if you plan on carrying lots around with you on your next trip.

Powered by a 250-watt Brose Centerdrive system, the Redux is capable of reaching speeds of up to 28 mph, which comes in handy when dodging traffic. The lithium-ion battery provides enough juice to give the bike a range of up to 80 miles between recharges, making it a great option for daily commuters. Raleigh even outfitted the bike with wide tires which provide stability and traction, even when the road gets wet. Other key features include a 10-speed Shimano crankset and shifters and a built-in LCD screen that displays all the usual information.
As electric bike options continue to expand, brands are integrating the batteries more seamlessly. That makes them look sleeker (and more like a real bike). Batteries are expensive, so make sure there’s a good way to lock the battery to your bike if you’ll be keeping it outside. Overall weight is important. Some battery and motors can add 15 pounds or more to the bike. With assist, you won’t feel that much when you’re riding, but you will if you have to carry your bike up stairs or lift it onto a bike rack.

Speed is one of the biggest selling points of this e-bike. In fact, it’s among the models that offer the widest range of gears on the list. You get 21 speed gear options for perfect climbing ability. The whole transmission system is Shimano, which means professional quality and smooth, consistent performance. 250W motor is integrated on the transmission system to provides speeds of up to 25km/h.
Electric mountain bikes are here, growing in popularity, and despite some access concerns—and perhaps because of them—continue to get better, more enjoyable to ride. Their small motors help you ride faster, farther, and can making challenging climbs less daunting. We tested 10 of the most exciting new models to help you find the right one for you. Read quick reviews of top five options below, or scroll deeper for helpful buying advice and longer reviews of every option.
×