The Altitude Powerplay is one of three bikes on this list (Specialized Turbo Levo and Liv Intrigue E+ are the others) to use a custom motor. The Dyname 3.0 motor offers 100Nm of torque and is also compact enough that Rocky can use the same geometry and suspension-pivot placement as an unplugged Altitude, so the Powerplay feels more like an unplugged bike than most e-bikes. With the motor off it rides like a standard, albeit heavy, trail bike. The motor responds more quickly than some of the more popular systems and the increased torque offers increased acceleration, which, depending on the trail situation, can be welcome or a hindrance.
While falling gas prices have temporarily halted years of gains in the number of bicycle commuters, more and more of us are using the bicycle to get around. It’s economical, provides good exercise, and is much cheaper than owning a car. But unless you’re in really good shape, you aren’t going to get very far. Enter the electric bike: a glorious new contraption that lets you get around without having to worry about arriving at your destinations a sweaty mess.
When it comes to the distance it can cover at a single charge, it really depends. For instance, if you live 13 miles from work and ride on a smooth, flat pavement, the bike has enough power to get you home. The battery level does decrease when the motor is under increased stress—like when you’re riding up a hilly terrain—but it quickly levels itself when you go back riding on a flat road surface.
The Remote CTRL is a playful ride that’s great for varied trails with rock gardens and flow sections, and that excels on fast trails with steep, punchy climbs and tight, twisty descents. It isn’t just for riders who may need a little assistance; the E-MTB mode creates an organic riding experience that allows you to take the skills you already have and ride faster and harder. It has a 150mm RockShox Yari fork and a 132mm RockShox Monarch Plus R shock with good mid-stroke support and a progressive finish to help prevent bottoming out on big hits. The 27.5x2.8-inch Maxxis Recon tires offer plenty of traction and also help to absorb smaller hits. The Remote CTRL's excellent Bosch motor accelerates smoothly to be more manageable when pedaling through rocky sections and has more oomph at low cadence than other motors, so you can more easily ride out of tough situations if you get bogged down.
After you decide which style of e-bike you want, consider the class. In the U.S., there are three classes defined by the type of assist and how fast the motor will propel you. Most electric bikes sold are class 1 or 3. Class 1 bikes have a motor (max 750w) that assists while you’re pedaling, up to 20 mph. Class 3, also known as “speed pedelec,” can also have up to a 750w motor, but it can assist you up to 28 mph. Both are allowed in most states and cities without requiring a license. Class 2 models have throttles that don’t require the rider to pedal in order to get a boost. They’re allowed on most streets, bike lanes, and paths, but are less popular than the other classes and not covered much here (because not only do we still love to pedal, we also prefer the greater distances that pedal-assist bikes can cover).
Its quiet motor is perfect for coming up on a kill without scaring animals away. You can travel up to 19 MPH on this bike, which means you’re not breaking a sweat zipping on and off roads (which is great for animals sensitive to human aromas). Not only that, but it can carry up to 300 lbs, which is great for hauling your hunt in without a car or dirt bike. At only 66lbs, the Rambo R750XP is one of the lightest yet hardest performing e-bikes we’ve seen- definitely consider this bike if you plan on carrying lots around with you on your next trip.

It was easy, good tools were shipped with the bike. The instructions are nearly useless, though. Like other reviews state, the front fork is backwards in the picture and shipped backwards. The disk brake should be on the port/left side. Flip the handlebar clasp around and leave the dirt guard facing forward. All the cables should flow naturally this way. Pedals were ok to put on, one of the pedals took a minute to get threaded but eventually got tightened.
Addmotor HITHOT is slightly more lightweight than the Addmotor MOTAN model. The range is less but it is still impressive, and it is a bike that is built for slightly lighter riding all round. It is still a great bike, with suspension features and a strongly built frame. This bike has the added safety of front and rear brakes to make sure you can stop when you need to, even if that is at short notice.
The 250W motor and the 36V battery is built into a frame that also includes 26 inches wheels, anti-slip power-off brake, and Shimano 21-speed shifters. An integrated LCD screen shows power, speed, battery charge, and a few other statistics. It is suitable for adults as it can carry up to 360 lbs weight. However, the bike itself is almost 51 pounds, so keep that in mind.
On the road, it takes only a few turns of the pedals to activate the Vado’s motor and get it up to speed. In Turbo mode — the bike’s highest level of pedal-assist — the Vado reaches speeds of up to 28 miles per hour, after which the electric drive system automatically shuts off to conserve power (and abide by local law). A built-in LED readout on the handlebars allows riders to monitor battery life, check current speed, and track calories burned while also being able to glance at distance traveled. The Turbo Vado Mission Control app (iOS/Android) also connects to the bike via Bluetooth and allows riders to further tune their ride and adjust the bike’s settings.
You are now assured of smooth rides on all surfaces including the bumpy surfaces by getting this elegant e-bike. The electric bike features lightweight 26-inch alloy frames plus sturdy suspension fork, which enables it to deliver a smooth ride. Second, to this, it is very stable and able to support up to 260 lbs of weight. The durable electric bike is powered by 350W high-speed motor to ensure that you achieve a higher speed.
With a 150mm-travel RockShox Yari fork and 132mm of rear travel from the RockShox Monarch Plus R shock, the Remote CTRL is Kona’s first dual-suspension e-mountain bike. It’s powered by a 250-watt Bosch Performance Line XC mid-drive motor that uses the company’s progressive E-MTB mode that is adaptable to rider input, which means you don’t have to toggle through assistance modes while riding. It offers assistance up to 20 mph, and the 500Wh integrated battery is the largest Bosch currently offers. Beefy 27.5x2.8-inch Maxxis Recon tires offer plenty of traction and also help to absorb smaller hits.
E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque, and others, like Bosch’s Active Line, are nearly silent. But, generally, all four make good options. Look for motor output (in torque), which will give you an idea of total power. Just like car engines, more torque equals more power off the line and more boost to your pedaling. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a more important figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a more accurate reflection of power (higher Wh equals bigger range).
One thing that separates these two are their warranties.  Rambo offer a 1 year limited warranty.  While Quietkat offer a 1 year limited warranty on all it's components including the battery, but each frame is covered by a lifetime warranty.  Quietkat have been around longer and are a proven, reliable manufacturer.  They've got it figured out and this year's catalog shows just how good they are.  Rambo is a new, small company with big ambitions and a quality product that they can stand behind.
You'll have to wait until the fall to pick up one of Cannondale's new offerings, and it's clear that high-performance mountain e-bikes don't come cheap. The Habit NEO ranges from $5,500 to $7,000, and you're looking at between $6,000 to $9,000 for the Moterra line (the Moterra SE costs $8,500). These are for riders determined to overcome most any terrain and don't mind paying a premium.

Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.
Every e-bike here uses a hub motor rather than a mid-drive motor. Hub motors (the original industry standard and the lower-cost of the two) can be located on either the front or, more commonly, the rear wheel. Hub motors typically don’t offer the same natural maneuverability as today’s increasingly more common mid-drive motors because their weight is concentrated in the front or rear of the bike. In contrast, a mid-drive motor’s weight is low and centered over the bottom bracket, resulting in better control and a more balanced ride feel, much like a traditional bike. A hub motor’s top speed typically maxes out at 20 mph.
The advantages of fat tire bikes are many. You can ride them over rough or muddy ground, even snow. They are geared for rough terrain and provide good traction and balance. They will ride right over small obstructions such as branches and rocks, obstacles that might trip up a normal mountain bike. These bikes are built to take the beating a hunter will dish out.
We have customer service centers in both Nevada and North Carolina to assist with any questions or problems you may have. What's more, our dual East/West coast distribution centers mean we can get products to you quicker, and save on the shipping too, passing on the savings for even lower prices. Most products will reach most of the US within just 3 working days!
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