Over the past few years, electric mountain bikes have exploded in popularity. Our team researched the top models on the market and purchased seven models in the $4500-$6000 range to test and review. Our testers rode these pedal-assist mountain bikes for thousands of miles, countless hours, and many tens of thousands of vertical feet. In the process, we scrutinized each model's uphill and downhill performance, tested their distance range, paid close attention to the user-friendliness of their e-bike controls, and analyzed their power output. We rode of each of these bikes hard in an effort to expose their strengths and weaknesses and determine the key ride characteristics of each one, and most importantly how they compare to each other.


With most ebikes the choice of motor defines aspects of the frame geometry and to a lesser degree the suspension characteristics of the bike. Not with new Rock Mountain Altitude Powerplay. With its bespoke motor Rocky has been able to design an ebike that reflects the ride quality of a highly evolved 150mm trail bike. With instant power pickup, extended battery life and streamline proportions it’s not just the handling of the Rocky that will get you charged up for riding. It’s the best bike in this test by some margin, but we had an issue with the motor momentarily cutting and raising questions over it’s reliability.

Unlike the manual mountain bikes where you would have to fully rely on pedaling, electric mountain bikes depend on an electric charge. As expected, the bike has a battery, which often determines how far one can go on a single charge. A good electric mountain bike should have a good storage capacity. Although most mountain bikes have nearly the same battery storage capacity, it is not uncommon to find one that falls below par. It is also good to know how it performs and uses the battery under different weather conditions terrain and depending on the rider’s weight.

With mountain bikes already sporting hefty price tags, the cost of adding an electric pedal-assist motor might be enough to send the value-conscious rider's head spinning. In many cases, you get what you pay for and the most expensive models are the highest performing. This isn't always the case, however, and bikes like our Best Buy Award winner, the Giant Trance E+ 2 Pro cost less and perform nearly as well as the more expensive competition.
Its quiet motor is perfect for coming up on a kill without scaring animals away. You can travel up to 19 MPH on this bike, which means you’re not breaking a sweat zipping on and off roads (which is great for animals sensitive to human aromas). Not only that, but it can carry up to 300 lbs, which is great for hauling your hunt in without a car or dirt bike. At only 66lbs, the Rambo R750XP is one of the lightest yet hardest performing e-bikes we’ve seen- definitely consider this bike if you plan on carrying lots around with you on your next trip.

The Vilano Core electric bike is the perfect bike for both cities and villages. The assist technology that is built-in the bike will help to conquer wind and hills. The Vilano core electric bike has a powerful 10.4AH Samsung Lithium-Ion Battery. With a single charge of this battery, you can reach 15- 25 miles. It has an aluminum frame, but at the same time, the bike is lightweight. The 5-speed setting would help you to choose the right speed you want to go. This electric bike is not only stylish but sturdy as well.


This utilitarian Class 3 (28 mph) road e-bike is smooth and torquey thanks to its Bosch Performance Speed motor. With a drop bar and traditional road-bike position and handling, the CrossRip+ is more suited to long rides on mixed terrain than navigating congested city streets. It comes with a rear rack—for mounting bags, not for attaching cargo directly—full fenders, a kickstand, and integrated front and rear lights (which are powered by the Bosch 500Wh battery). It features a SRAM Force 1x11 drivetrain, hydraulic disc brakes, and wide 700x38mm tires.
Carry Extra Gear - They are built to carry 300lbs and if that’s not enough the trailers can carry an additional 100lbs so you can make it one quick effortless trip in and out instead of a tiring back and forth lugging heavy gear on your back.  Plus the bunch of other accessories available like rear racks and waterproof saddle bags for extra storage on the bike and not on your back.

The e-bike is driven by a large capacity lithium-ion battery. This makes it suitable for long hours of the ride. It also has two working modes. The assisted bike and e-bike mode; hence when it runs out of battery, you can pedal to complete the journey. It has been built from the best quality of aluminum alloy frames to ensure that it provides years of service. The wheels are also large and provide excellent movement on all surfaces.


It used to be you’d have to shell out a pretty penny to grab a piece of the e-bike fun. And while high-priced models still and always will exist—you can own a Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo mountain bike for a mere 12 grand—there are now some very affordable options that weren’t available a year ago. If you’re in it more for the fun than you are for high performance, you likely won’t notice where that extra money is being saved. For example, every bike on this list uses a hub-drive motor versus a mid-drive type, is designed with less integration (think battery and lights), mixes in some lower-quality parts, and has a top speed of 20 mph (save for the Aventon Pace 500 that boosts up to 28 mph). The trade-off: Every bike on this list—save the $1,699, which we included for its relatively high value—is sub-$1,500. Here’s what you’ll typically get with an e-bike in this price range.
The adjustable front shock offers smooth cushioning and buffers the jerks when cycling on uneven surfaces. However, the rear shock is rigid and hard to move. The Shimano 21-gear shifters will allow you to enjoy great speed with a maximum of 20mph. But, it would be better to have at least 24 gears at that speed, because you will feel almost no resistance when cycling at the max speed in the highest gear.
With its steep seat tube angle and powerful motor, the Rotwild E+ Ultra masters even the steepest climbs. Its high centre of gravity, however, negatively effects downhill handling. The GIANT FULL E+ 0 is a very solid eMTB where what you see is what you get, although the rather slack seat tube and bulbous-belly isn’t exactly pretty. Not so with the FOCUS SAM²: With its clean silhouette it is a bike for design lovers. But only if you get by with the small integrated battery. As soon as you mount an additional battery, not only the appearance suffers, but also the handling. The BMC Trailfox AMP has minor weaknesses in the componentry, finish and downhill handling – at a price of € 12,000 we expected considerably more. The Thömus Lightrider E1 fares better, it’s no bargain either, but the handling is outstanding. It’s a pity that the bike isn’t available outside of Switzerland. Another exotic specimen is the FANTIC XF1 Integra Enduro 160. The bike from the Italian motorcycle brand can’t deny its roots, tremendously composed and capable on the descents, though it cannot keep up with the competition when going back up – the 180 mm version of the Fantic is significantly better overall.

Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position.
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With a 150mm-travel RockShox Yari fork and 132mm of rear travel from the RockShox Monarch Plus R shock, the Remote CTRL is Kona’s first dual-suspension e-mountain bike. It’s powered by a 250-watt Bosch Performance Line XC mid-drive motor that uses the company’s progressive E-MTB mode that is adaptable to rider input, which means you don’t have to toggle through assistance modes while riding. It offers assistance up to 20 mph, and the 500Wh integrated battery is the largest Bosch currently offers. Beefy 27.5x2.8-inch Maxxis Recon tires offer plenty of traction and also help to absorb smaller hits.

Both options are great, while the derailleur will give you more options to choose from when climbing hills the rear cog is an internal component with less moving parts so it's a fraction quieter and requires no oiling or regular maintenance, some prefer the rear cog as it's one less component to get snagged in the thick brush but that is almost never an issue.  whichever system you choose you will have fun!
It used to be you’d have to shell out a pretty penny to grab a piece of the e-bike fun. And while high-priced models still and always will exist—you can own a Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo mountain bike for a mere 12 grand—there are now some very affordable options that weren’t available a year ago. If you’re in it more for the fun than you are for high performance, you likely won’t notice where that extra money is being saved. For example, every bike on this list uses a hub-drive motor versus a mid-drive type, is designed with less integration (think battery and lights), mixes in some lower-quality parts, and has a top speed of 20 mph (save for the Aventon Pace 500 that boosts up to 28 mph). The trade-off: Every bike on this list—save the $1,699, which we included for its relatively high value—is sub-$1,500. Here’s what you’ll typically get with an e-bike in this price range.
Amazing bike, quick. On the flat average 21mph full power, after 3-4 miles average 18mph. A lot of hills in SoCal so this 1/3 hp motor does it’s job well with pedal assist on very steep grades. With electric only mode and heavy, steep, long hills this bike does its job pushing through a 16 mile commute with some energy to spare with a 190lb load of me and my gear. This bike could do much more with flat and pedal assist modes maybe twice as far. Recommend you use smaller tires 1.75 vs the standard 1.95 to achieve my results. Continental contact travels work great!
The adjustable front shock offers smooth cushioning and buffers the jerks when cycling on uneven surfaces. However, the rear shock is rigid and hard to move. The Shimano 21-gear shifters will allow you to enjoy great speed with a maximum of 20mph. But, it would be better to have at least 24 gears at that speed, because you will feel almost no resistance when cycling at the max speed in the highest gear.

The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.
The 250W motor and the 36V battery is built into a frame that also includes 26 inches wheels, anti-slip power-off brake, and Shimano 21-speed shifters. An integrated LCD screen shows power, speed, battery charge, and a few other statistics. It is suitable for adults as it can carry up to 360 lbs weight. However, the bike itself is almost 51 pounds, so keep that in mind.
The Stalker 750 eBike by BackCountry is truly a remarkable machine.  This hunting bike is perfect for those looking for a combination of strength and functionality.  The Stalker comes standard with a powerful but very quiet Bafang 750-watt electric motor that will help get you down just about any trail. A 48 volt battery allows you to go even further into the wilderness in pursuit of game. 
The frame itself incorporates a series of mounts allowing you to easily trick-out the Road E+1 with a rack, fenders, or panniers to more aptly meet your touring requirements. Again, most touring purists will certainly scoff at the mere notion of pedal-assistance, however, individuals looking for more of a guided tour and less of a tour de force will swoon over the Road E+1.
The extra grip a 50lb e-bike normally helps to prevent overshooting corners when on the brakes, and bring pure DH-bike-like fun factor on the steepest trails. This electric Orange, however, rides more like a ‘standard’ enduro bike with a motor, which could be good or bad, depending on your expectations and riding style. It’s built tough and delivers stacks of fun in less time than any regular bike can. Adding a motor hasn’t upset Orange’s superb geometry.

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