This utilitarian Class 3 (28 mph) road e-bike is smooth and torquey thanks to its Bosch Performance Speed motor. With a drop bar and traditional road-bike position and handling, the CrossRip+ is more suited to long rides on mixed terrain than navigating congested city streets. It comes with a rear rack—for mounting bags, not for attaching cargo directly—full fenders, a kickstand, and integrated front and rear lights (which are powered by the Bosch 500Wh battery). It features a SRAM Force 1x11 drivetrain, hydraulic disc brakes, and wide 700x38mm tires.
Thanks for your excellent article. I’ve been riding ebike for about 16 years. My first electric bike was a Meridian pedal assist bike. I just up graded to a new bike. I’m 73, so I wanted a pedal assist bike that had a throttle. I researched for several months and bought what I think is the best bike for the money. It’s a Rad Rover 2017 fat bike. It has a 750 watt mother with a 48 volt 11.6 amp battery. It’s a fantastic bike, that is a lot of fun to ride. You might want to check it out and add it to your list of bikes. Rad Rover also make a city commuter bike, a cargo bike and a folding bike. You can’t beat their price for a quality bike. Thanks again for both of your articles. They were very informative.
Living life on the edge is certainly respectable, but there comes a time in every rider’s life where they want to enjoy their favorite trail without all of the work that’s typically associated with a trip up the mountain. Luckily, the electronically-assisted mountain bike has become insanely popular in recent years, thanks to an entire subset of riders who want to spend less time pedaling and more time enjoying their hard-earned therapy hours. Below, we’ll outline a handful of this year’s most capable cycles, and give you some elaborate insight as to why they’re the best of the best when it comes to hybrid traversal.
The Ultra Mid Drive Bafang motor is the best motor there is and due to it’s high cost most other brands have not adopted it yet. The ‘Ultra’ has torque sensors built in so it knows how much power to give you based on how much pressure you are applying to the pedals, so it intelligently gives you the right amount of power when you need it most and not a predetermined power regardless of what terrain you’re tackling, so you have more control.
As someone who owns both a Quest and Rift S I think this article misses the mark in a few areas: While the Quest technically has a higher resolution, it is a pentile display and as such is is more prone to godrays, glare and SDE. The overall resolution of the Rift S is lower but it has an RGB stripe display with more subpixels so side by side it actually looks sharper. Quest has 4 tracking cameras, Rift S has 5 so the overall area it can scan is greater and this makes a difference, especially in games where you lift your arms up and above your head. In order to move the data over the USB C wire the image will be compressed at the sides so it won't be as sharp or well defined as what you will see in the Rift S. In my experience, the Rift S refresh rate of 80hz is really the bottom end for comfortable VR experiences. When playing games that support cross buy or watching videos, I still experience discomfort on the Quest (especially during fast movement) whereas the same content feels perfect comfortable on my Rift S and even PSVR. This is more of a personal preference thing but I find the Rift S halo design far, far more comfortable to extended sessions that the Quest scuba mask design. So while it's impressive that the Quest will soon become a hybrid VR headset, let's not get carried away and just ignore its shortcomings and limitations. For the best PCVR experience a dedicated PCVR headset is still the way to go.
Boasting incredible speeds of up to 17 mph and dependable geometry and stability, the Goplus electric mountain bike is one to die for. It is built to be lightweight yet durable, thanks to a dependable aluminum alloy frame. Among other features that are worth mentioning in this electric mountain bike includes its 6-speed transmission system, powerful LED headlamp and sharp hydraulic brakes.
Scott’s Genius eRide 900 Tuned mountain bike is a direct descendant of the company’s lauded Genius, bringing the famed off-road capabilities of the original to a new level, thanks to an electronically-assisted motor system. The bike’s been dressed in the finest peripherals known to man, including an SRAM X01 Eagle groupset, Shimano XT BR-M8120 4 Piston Disc performance brakes, and a FOX 36 Float Factory Air front suspension, complementing the company’s select damper rear setup and lightweight carbon frame. Better yet, it’s powered by a 625Wh Bosch Performance CX e-drive system, offering riders a sleek, compact assist that’s 48% smaller than previous generations. To keep you rolling true, a set of durable Syncros Revelstoke-E 1.5 wheels, Schwalbe Kevlar tires, and Scott’s proprietary Evo-Lap technology keep both you, and your bike in one piece, so you can continue to charge the summit day in, and day out.

For two months I had fun with the bike and loved it until it stopped working. The controls lid up but no power with a full charge. At this point I was about to write a 4 star review but with the breakdown I decided not to. Long story short I sent the bike for repair. They promised 3 days to repair and return or replace if they can’t fix it. They could not fix it so I received another new bike – after another week of waiting.
100% Down with this Ebike Movement, May 30, 2017 I had a massive heart attack 7 miles into a 15 mile... ride on my Stache 9.6 (love that bike). I had to be rescued by the Sherif's department and rushed to the ER. My heart was in bad shape and I thought I was finished riding bikes. 6 months later I am riding averaging 6- 10 miles a day thanks to my e-bike.Trek Powerfly 5. I will buy another Ebike and love the fact that you guys are covering this great addition to the bicycle Community. See More
All the models we tested are full suspension all mountain/trail bike models with relatively similar amounts of suspension travel, geometry, and wheel/tire size. The addition of a large battery and a small motor adds significant weight to an e-bike, and they generally weigh in the neighborhood of 50 lbs, approximately 20 pounds heavier than non-e-bikes, and the heavy weight of these bikes makes them more difficult to ride without the support of the pedal-assist motor.
Hello Guys! I am John Reese, a professional biker and my hobby is biking! I have been biking for last 6 years and I love using bikes while outing as well. Based on my experiences with the different type of bikes (mountain bikes, road bikes and hybrid bikes); I am sharing my opinion about various bikes so that a beginner can get started right away. Happy reading!
Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position.
The only ancheer has done right with this bike is take it off the market. This was my third e-bike purchased on Amazon. Thought I would take a chance with ancheer since most reviews seemed positive. I should have looked more closely at the negative ones. It appears that since the first of the year there were a lot of problems with the motor not performing properly. That's exactly what happened to me. The throttle actually works, but the PAS is useless. It takes 10 to 12 peddle revolutions before the motor engages and when you stop the motor starts to drag. Tried to return but ancheer balked, I finally settled for a 250.00 "adjustment" after amazon got involved. I have a cyclamatic CX1 that I keep in Florida, and my wife rides a city E bike so we know what to expect in an electric bike. I ordered another cyclamatic last week. Should have done it in the first place. 365.00 lesson on my part.
In addition to this, it is easier to transport and store. It has a foldable design and with the lightweight design, you will find it more reliable. Other than this, the bike also features the Shimano 7-speed transmission system, which makes it elementary to shift the speed. The two-mode bike can function as an assisted bike and electric bike at the same time. It provides a longer runtime due to the 36V 8Ah lithium-ion battery.
Built by a company that’s made cycling equipment for more than four decades, the Vado feels more like a traditional bicycle than almost any other ebike. Its frame and components have been tuned to provide a familiar experience, making it easy for new and long-time cyclists to jump on and start pedaling. Specialized’s heritage shines through nicely, helping separate itself from the competition in an increasingly crowded ebike market.
So it's time to get yourself one of those fancy new electric bikes that are passing you by on your morning commute. To help you find the latest in E-Vehicle technology and make sure you spend your hard-earned money on the best model, we purchased and tested the top 40 electric bikes on the market today. During our tests, we measured things like motor power, maximum range, top speed and overall weight limit. We also looked at more subtle things like comfort and additional features like removable batteries and charging times.
Despite it's prodigious descending talents the short (426mm) chainstays make tight corners and lifting the front end easy. That also makes flying through flow trails and popping off rocks a staple of the Altitude's arsenal. With uncompromised suspension and geometry, a powerful motor and big battery, and excellent trail manners, the Rocky offers a compellingly unique e-package that performs well in all situations.
The bike shows greater terrain adaptability with the 300W brushless motor and 36V Li-ion battery. The 6-speed Shimano gears provide further range variation. You can select any one from the five levels of PAS but the level one or two assist is perfect for cycling on most tracks. Be careful that there will be little pedal resistance at higher levels. You can also twist the variable speed throttle instead of selecting the pedal assistance.
Foldable bikes are becoming ever more popular. Being foldable means that the bike is storable. This means that it does not take up unnecessary space in a house or a shed etc. It also means that it could be hung up on a wall, should this be a requirement. They certainly have advantages over bikes that cannot fold, and their overall integrity of strength and purpose is not compromised.

You've gotta get up to get down, and one of the purposes of e-bikes is to make it much easier to do so. Since we spend significantly more time climbing than descending, we felt it was important to rate how well these bikes perform when pointed uphill. Climbing on an e-MTB with pedal assist support is somewhat different than climbing on a bike without a motor. These bikes are capable of carrying some serious speed uphill, changing the climbing dynamic with a much faster pace, often tossing finesse out the window in favor of power and momentum. The heavy weight of these bikes and plus-sized tires gives them incredible traction, keeping them planted on the ground, and dampening switches can be left wide open to enjoy the added traction benefits of active rear suspension. Each bike's geometry, handling, and power output all played a role in how well these bikes performed on the ascents, and we had plenty of time to test them while rallying back uphill for more downhill laps.


The 150mm (fork) and 140mm (shock) suspension allows you to hit double-track ruts without veering from your line and are tuned for the added weight of the motor and battery. That makes the bike easier to handle than a bike this heavy might otherwise. The motor is powerful and torquey meaning you can stay in the lower two assist levels of the five available to save battery and still get enough kick to ascend just slightly faster than on a regular bike. The highest setting really has some oomph, with a little too much power to use on tight or technical trails. It’s better for fire road climbs or cruising on pavement to the trail head or back home after a ride.
Both the Rocky Mountain Instinct Powerplay and the Giant Trance E+ 2 Pro fell short of the bar set by the competition with their all-in-one shifter/display units. The Giant outperforms the Rocky Mountain here, but both attempts at LED displays integrated into the control unit are more challenging to read than digital displays. Our Editor's Choice Award winner, the Specialized Turbo Levo Comp scored the lowest in this rating due to the lack of a handlebar-mounted display and a less user-friendly charging connection.
Mountain biking is all about having fun, right? About getting out there, enjoying the great outdoors, exercising your body and freeing your mind. So what if we told you there was a type of bike that lets you ride further, faster, and have even more fun? One that even made you LOL on the climbs? You’d still have to work for your rewards, but by assisting your efforts, it allowed you to wring every little drop of enjoyment out of your rides. Are electric mountain bikes allowed on trails?
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