The Surly Big Easy is the Cadillac of the bike lane. The company’s new longtail e-cargo bike exudes a “they don’t make ’em like this anymore” stature, thanks to a beefed-up chromoly steel frame rolling on tough 26x2.5-inch tires. And because it’s a class 1 e-bike, you can actually ride it in the bike lane, too. The 7-foot-long, 67-pound bike won’t play well with your third-floor walk-up, so it’s best to think of it as a car supplement or replacement—that’s what Surly intended, anyway, as evidenced by the $5,000 price tag. However, if you’re ready to commit to the cargo bike life, you’ll struggle to find a stronger platform for achieving bike commuter nirvana.

The fit is a little rough for me. I'm tall, about 73 inches, and I feel like the bike is small. I've ridden a few dozen miles to include a trip with a kids trailer towed behind, and it hasn't been really uncomfortable, but a little cramped compared to my Schwinn Trailway 28"/700c hybrid bike. Seat adjusts up but feels tilted back a little more than I would like. I have ridden in shorts and tshirt to the beach as well as khakis and a button up with backpack to work, ok comfort both ways. Perhaps it will just take some time to get used to.

Hello Guys! I am John Reese, a professional biker and my hobby is biking! I have been biking for last 6 years and I love using bikes while outing as well. Based on my experiences with the different type of bikes (mountain bikes, road bikes and hybrid bikes); I am sharing my opinion about various bikes so that a beginner can get started right away. Happy reading!
Built around a heavy-duty alloy frame, the GSD eschews many of the traits of other cargo bikes: long wheelbases, bigger wheels, and especially, an unwieldy ride. Yet it boasts an extensive capacity, nimble handling—even fully loaded, thanks to a short wheelbase and 20-inch wheels—and enduring range in a package not much bigger than most non-cargo e-bikes. The stout frame holds a 250-watt Bosch motor that gives up to 275 percent of your power back to the pedals and reaches 20 mph. The GSD has room for two battery packs, extending the batteries’ combined range to a claimed 150 miles and making the Tern one of the longest-lasting e-bikes on the market. A laundry list of accessories and a (claimed) 396-pound carrying capacity round out the GSD’s status as an epic day-tripper.

The 150mm (fork) and 140mm (shock) suspension allows you to hit double-track ruts without veering from your line. The motor is powerful and torquey, meaning you can stay in the lower two assist levels (of the five available) to save battery and still get enough kick to ascend just slightly faster than you could on a regular bike. The highest setting has serious oomph, with a little too much power to use on tight or technical trails. It’s better for fire road climbs or cruising on pavement to the trail head or back home after a ride. The Yamaha motor with 80 Nm of peak torque has generous kick to get over small rises or tough spots on the trail. And the boost can hit quickly; Liv says you get full boost (based on your power setting) in just 190 milliseconds and that that quick response time was noticeable, but not welcome in every situation, by our testers. The Liv feels lighter than other e-mountain bikes, so it’s a great option for women looking for a balance between power and maneuverability.


Another important element is the primary user interface or the controls. It should be user-friendly so that the rider can navigate the features easily. A straightforward control panel should not include anything more than a small, digital display with clear readings, ergonomic thumb shifters, and a charging connection. In fact, a thumb shifter is even better than electronic buttons, although some riders may disagree.
On the road, it takes only a few turns of the pedals to activate the Vado’s motor and get it up to speed. In Turbo mode — the bike’s highest level of pedal-assist — the Vado reaches speeds of up to 28 miles per hour, after which the electric drive system automatically shuts off to conserve power (and abide by local law). A built-in LED readout on the handlebars allows riders to monitor battery life, check current speed, and track calories burned while also being able to glance at distance traveled. The Turbo Vado Mission Control app (iOS/Android) also connects to the bike via Bluetooth and allows riders to further tune their ride and adjust the bike’s settings.
Its quiet motor is perfect for coming up on a kill without scaring animals away. You can travel up to 19 MPH on this bike, which means you’re not breaking a sweat zipping on and off roads (which is great for animals sensitive to human aromas). Not only that, but it can carry up to 300 lbs, which is great for hauling your hunt in without a car or dirt bike. At only 66lbs, the Rambo R750XP is one of the lightest yet hardest performing e-bikes we’ve seen- definitely consider this bike if you plan on carrying lots around with you on your next trip.

Many years of experience have clearly shown that it isn’t possible to make a universal and realistic estimate of an ebike’s range. The range of an eMTB depends on countless factors such as the support level, terrain, rider weight, environmental conditions, and cadence. Those who demand a lot of power from the motor consume a lot of electricity. If you want to travel far, you’ll have to save battery power. Read more about this topic in our article The truth about lab tests.

The CIVI Bikes 500w Predator Electric Mountain bike is what your next fishing trip in the woods needs. This bike’s got 4” wide tires for tons of stability, front suspension to take those bumpier parts of the ride, and disc brakes with plenty of safety and stopping power. The 7 speed Shimano hub pairs well with the pedal-assist system to help make your ride easier and last longer.

Yes, there are less expensive ebikes on the market but most come with a few serious caveats. The Espin Sport delivers on the full promise of an electric bike, but in a more affordable fashion. This bike isn’t going to tow you around for a 60-mile round-trip endeavor but those seeking their first ebike will get plenty of return on their investment with this model.
The only ancheer has done right with this bike is take it off the market. This was my third e-bike purchased on Amazon. Thought I would take a chance with ancheer since most reviews seemed positive. I should have looked more closely at the negative ones. It appears that since the first of the year there were a lot of problems with the motor not performing properly. That's exactly what happened to me. The throttle actually works, but the PAS is useless. It takes 10 to 12 peddle revolutions before the motor engages and when you stop the motor starts to drag. Tried to return but ancheer balked, I finally settled for a 250.00 "adjustment" after amazon got involved. I have a cyclamatic CX1 that I keep in Florida, and my wife rides a city E bike so we know what to expect in an electric bike. I ordered another cyclamatic last week. Should have done it in the first place. 365.00 lesson on my part.
The Stalker 750 eBike by BackCountry is truly a remarkable machine.  This hunting bike is perfect for those looking for a combination of strength and functionality.  The Stalker comes standard with a powerful but very quiet Bafang 750-watt electric motor that will help get you down just about any trail. A 48 volt battery allows you to go even further into the wilderness in pursuit of game. 

The Riese & Müller bills its Load Touring HS as “the ultimate minivan of e-bikes” and the claim holds up. With a low center of gravity (aided by the 20-inch front and 26-inch rear wheels), the Load is easy to handle. Tektro hydraulic disc brakes add control, and front and rear suspension provide comfort. The Bosch motor offers an assist up to 275 percent of your effort until you hit 28 mph, when it cuts out. Two 500Wh batteries give you 12 hours or more of range at full power. It’s capable of toting up to 220 pounds of pets, people, and less-animate cargo. R&M also sells a double child seat for kids up to age 6 and a child-seat fastener for your youngest passengers.

So let's take a look at the fat tire electric hunting bikes on the list.  And this review has been updated to name a clear winner from the pack.  You can't go wrong with any of these three electric hunting bike brands but after the the last 12 months or so a clear winner has stood out so at the bottom of this review we name our favorite.  So first off we have.....


Pedaling all the way is not an option when you are climbing steep trails. An e-bike is a solution, and the folding e-MTB from Ancheer does more than just helping you conquering precipitous hills. It is also excellent for an enjoyable workout as you can tune it up for light to extreme sessions. Overall, it’s a good electric mountain bike at a pocket-friendly cost.

Usually, the cheaper the bike the cheaper the parts. But this doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be riding around on a rattling tin can. It just means that the bike’s designers took into consideration where they could include lower-level parts without sacrificing safety while putting the money where it counts most—hydraulic disc brakes, decent tires, a reliable e-system. And although the electrical components on some of these bikes might not be plastered with a familiar name, like Bosch or Shimano, that doesn’t mean they’re not capable. Aventon, for example, uses a custom e-system (rather than a complete one) that was pieced together specifically for the Pace 500 because the designers didn’t want to limit the bike’s design specifications.

Our testers were a little underwhelmed by the downhill prowess of a couple of our competitors. The Rocky Mountain Instinct Powerplay Alloy 50 has loads of potential with excellent geometry and trail-smoothing rear suspension, but the spec of a wimpy fork and non-aggressive tires detract from its downhill confidence when the going gets steep or rough. The Trek Powerfly 7 FS was our least favorite e-bike to ride downhill, with an even less impressive component specification that held it back and didn't inspire confidence on descents.
The bikes we tested all use a different e-bike motor system, and the controls, the primary user interface, are an important element we rated but didn't weight as heavily as some of the others. Each motor system and its associated controls are slightly different. Our primary interest is in how user-friendly is it to interact with the system, how intuitive and ergonomic are the shifters, how good and easy to read is the display, and how easy is it to charge the battery? Each drive system also has a smartphone app that is intended to allow the user to fine-tune the motor's support settings, create custom settings, monitor battery charge and health, and a whole lot more. We don't feel the apps are necessary for the use of any of these e-MTB's, but those with an affinity for technology or personalizing your ride may be inclined to use them.
The $1,000 price level is where e-bikes can get sketchy: Lithium-ion battery technology is still pricey, so corners must be cut elsewhere to keep costs down. At $999.99, the Aventon Pace 350 is one such bike, but our test revealed it’s not too cheap to be quality. The Class 2 e-bike tops out at 20 mph, whether you get there by pedal-assist or a throttle. There’s a 7-speed Shimano Tourney drivetrain and five levels of e-assist, giving you various pedaling options. You don’t get lights or fenders, but the Pace 350 felt totally viable for daily commuting.
Trevor Porter, Kona's e-bike manager, said that motors can demand longer chainstays and adding batteries to downtubes can require larger headtubes, increasing stack height. This is common across the range of e-mtbs we tested. The reach and head tube angle tend to remain similar to standard bikes, but the chainstay length, head tube length, and stack height are generally increased.
The 250W e-bike is very powerful and able to deliver a speed of 25 km/h. With this, you will find it great for riding long distances. Other than this, it also has an 8Ah battery, which guarantees a longer runtime. It features a powerful headlight that makes the bike great for night riding. Lastly, the ergonomic bike is very safe due to the efficient braking system.
their other models may have the same issue … This model comes to mind https://www.walmart.com/ip/ANCHEER-Folding-Electric-Mountain-Bike-with-20-Inch-Wheel-Large-Capacity-Lithium-Ion-Battery-36V-250W-Premium-Full-Suspension-and-Shimano-Gear/250514812?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=10813&adid=22222222227128420528&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=235191079813&wl4=pla-578827040352&wl5=9012089&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=117084435&wl11=online&wl12=250514812&wl13=&veh=sem
As you can see, both of these eBike brands are great for hunting.  Each of their models offers something different but they all are made from durable materials. Each bike on this list was designed to travel long distances under rough conditions without making noise.  If you are thinking of getting a new eBike for the purpose of hunting, you really can’t go wrong with either of these brands!  So check them out for yourself to see which might be right for you.    How much do electric mountain bikes cost?
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