The Blix Vika+ is a folding e-bike with a utilitarian execution: At nearly 50 pounds, it’s heavy for its size, and the folding mechanism isn’t as slick as other folding bikes we’ve tested. That said, it does fold into a small package and feels sturdy enough for riding between errands. The geared hub motor is adequately powerful and an included throttle makes it easier to get off the line. A rear rack, front and rear lights, and a kickstand come with the bike—it’s everything you need for zippy urban commuting.

With its steep seat tube angle and powerful motor, the Rotwild E+ Ultra masters even the steepest climbs. Its high centre of gravity, however, negatively effects downhill handling. The GIANT FULL E+ 0 is a very solid eMTB where what you see is what you get, although the rather slack seat tube and bulbous-belly isn’t exactly pretty. Not so with the FOCUS SAM²: With its clean silhouette it is a bike for design lovers. But only if you get by with the small integrated battery. As soon as you mount an additional battery, not only the appearance suffers, but also the handling. The BMC Trailfox AMP has minor weaknesses in the componentry, finish and downhill handling – at a price of € 12,000 we expected considerably more. The Thömus Lightrider E1 fares better, it’s no bargain either, but the handling is outstanding. It’s a pity that the bike isn’t available outside of Switzerland. Another exotic specimen is the FANTIC XF1 Integra Enduro 160. The bike from the Italian motorcycle brand can’t deny its roots, tremendously composed and capable on the descents, though it cannot keep up with the competition when going back up – the 180 mm version of the Fantic is significantly better overall.
Our team of experienced testers rode them for weeks on our local trails—everything from flow trails, to technical singletrack, to our enduro courses. We self-shuttled DH runs and hit the bike path. To understand the differences between them, we rode them back to back on similar trails. We tested them against standard bikes on the same trails in the same conditions. And to evaluate their range, we charged them all and ran them on full power until their batteries flickered and died.
Unlike other hunting bikes, the Juggernaut comes equipped with both a twist throttle (most have thumb throttles) and a pedal-assist feature. When you need to pedal long distances the pedal assist will read the cadence of your ride and kick in to help you ride smoother without tiring yourself. After a long day of fishing or having fun, just pull back the throttle and head back to camp. Trust us: the BikTrix 750W Juggernaut Classic Electric Mountain Bike will come in handy on your next fishing trip.
Our All Terrain electric fat bike is the ideal electric bike for hunting thanks to it’s whisper-quiet operation, 20+ mile range on throttle only and 28 mph top speed. The 4″ tires are ready to roll smoothly over all types of terrain from soft mud to deep snow. See how we’re quickly changing the game for hunters all across America with our affordable and high quality electric fat bike.
The Rutland 30-day test ride is available on all full price, non-discounted bikes available for home delivery on rutlandcycling.com. It is not available on discounted or special offer bikes, click and collect bikes, bikes bought on finance, bikes bought through Cyclescheme, or bikes bought in store. This offer is only available on bikes delivered to mainland UK addresses.

The Hyper E-Ride Electric Bike is an excellent example of a great city commuter electric bike. It has several design features. The electric bike has a step-through frame which makes it very easy to step on and ride it. Also, the bike comes with fenders in the front and the back. To make it more a casual-riding bike in the city, the handlebars are swept back a little bit. The e-bike has a Rear Hub Brushless 36volt 250W motor and the top speed is 20 mph which is enough for a city e-bike. Battery charging time is 4 hours and the total running time is 1 hour which is about 20 miles.
Many years of experience have clearly shown that it isn’t possible to make a universal and realistic estimate of an ebike’s range. The range of an eMTB depends on countless factors such as the support level, terrain, rider weight, environmental conditions, and cadence. Those who demand a lot of power from the motor consume a lot of electricity. If you want to travel far, you’ll have to save battery power. Read more about this topic in our article The truth about lab tests.
Despite it's prodigious descending talents the short (426mm) chainstays make tight corners and lifting the front end easy. That also makes flying through flow trails and popping off rocks a staple of the Altitude's arsenal. With uncompromised suspension and geometry, a powerful motor and big battery, and excellent trail manners, the Rocky offers a compellingly unique e-package that performs well in all situations.

It is a great e-bike which has a PAS feature. This means, that the bike is secure enough for riding for beginners and the motor is adjustable to your needs. It is a lightweight and simple e-bike.  The price is really astonishing for normal size electric bicycle. Another thing to mention Jasscol has disc brakes which are not so common on cheap bicycles. Read the full review here.
The aluminum, step-through eJoy is the happy medium between traditional-looking townies that don’t transport much more than the rider and often-cumbersome cargo models that are challenging to store. With 26-inch wheels, full fenders, a Shimano Alivio nine-speed drivetrain and disc brakes, a wheelbase similar to the average townie, and a big, comfy seat, it has the appearance of a practical everyday cruiser. But its oversize rear rack, silent Bosch Active Line motor, heavy-duty head tube with front-tray mounts (the tray is an add-on), integrated Supernova E3 lights, and roll-over-anything balloon tires hurtle it into hmm-this-could-actually-replace-my-car status. It’s one of the quietest, most convenient, most stylish, and easiest-to-operate e-bikes available.
https://electricbikereview.com/giant/... The Giant Dirt-E+ 1 is a full suspension electric mountain bike with capable hardware, excellent dealer support and impressive range, four frame sizes accommodate a range of riders, impressive pricepoint. 22-speed drivetrain with Shimano Deore XT Shadow Plus allows you to engage a clutch to tighten the chain and bolster shifting (important given the 80 Nm peak motor torque rating). Custom battery pack design fits neatly into the downtube but can be charged on or off the frame, compact display and button pad were large enough to read and press but stayed out of the way. Stiff thru-axles with boost hubs (longer than normal) support 2.6" tires, tapered head tube and ebike specific suspension from Fox is stiff, Maestro suspension design improves stopping and reduces bob.
The Altitude Powerplay is one of three bikes on this list (Specialized Turbo Levo and Liv Intrigue E+ are the others) to use a custom motor. The Dyname 3.0 motor offers 100Nm of torque and is also compact enough that Rocky can use the same geometry and suspension-pivot placement as an unplugged Altitude, so the Powerplay feels more like an unplugged bike than most e-bikes. With the motor off it rides like a standard, albeit heavy, trail bike. The motor responds more quickly than some of the more popular systems and the increased torque offers increased acceleration, which, depending on the trail situation, can be welcome or a hindrance.
By Max Shumpert: This article has been updated to reflect the most accurate information regarding best e-bikes available for those who are interested in new technology combined with traditional bikes. The best 5 available have changed, and information has been added to assist individuals in finding the best electric bicycles currently available on the market. The FAQ has also been updated.
With an electric mountain bike (or e-MTB) that gives you assistance up to 25kph, it’s possible to pack twice as much riding into the same amount of time. Those five great trails that you normally ride after work can now be ridden twice. That boring singletrack climb on your lunchtime loop suddenly becomes the highlight of your day. With the extra push from the motor it’s easy to double the distance covered, or do the same ride in half the time.
The Felt Redemption-E 50 is a 140/150mm travel all-mountain bike. At 53.5 pounds, it is the second heaviest in this group, but bike rockets up non-technical climbs, which makes it awesome for shuttle runs, but it can’t disguise its heft when navigating tricky switchbacks and rock gardens. Rather than moving the bike around with your body, you learn to mash the pedals and let the motor bludgeon the trail, trusting the e-mtb-tuned suspension to handle the hits. The Shimano motor's “trail” mode has all the power you’ll need, and quick surge of torque from stop means you have to be ready for the bike to take off before you get on the pedals. Everything on the Redemption-E 50 works well—the Shimano Deore brakes are powerful and the shifting is crisp—but the Redemption E-50 doesn’t work well everywhere. Buy it if you’ve got smooth and open trails to rip; skip it if you’re fond of crafting the perfect line through rough and technical singletrack.

The Vilano Core electric bike is the perfect bike for both cities and villages. The assist technology that is built-in the bike will help to conquer wind and hills. The Vilano core electric bike has a powerful 10.4AH Samsung Lithium-Ion Battery. With a single charge of this battery, you can reach 15- 25 miles. It has an aluminum frame, but at the same time, the bike is lightweight. The 5-speed setting would help you to choose the right speed you want to go. This electric bike is not only stylish but sturdy as well.
The Best in Test and Best Value tips do not result from the sum of star ratings, but by the assessment of the entire test team, taking into account the overall concept of the bike. It would be methodologically wrong to only add up the star ratings to make a final judgment in a scoring system – saying that something is “good” will not help anyone if they don’t know what it is for and for whom it is “good.” For this reason, we give a clear recommendation in every test result for which type of rider and purpose the bike is suitable and which not. The bikes themselves are as individual as the riders are – we just want to provide you with all the information you need to make a well-informed decision before buying. Here’s to long-lasting fun!
Jeremy Benson eats, sleeps, and breathes mountain bikes. This native New Englander started mountain biking in 1992. He got more serious in college and started racing bikes in 1999. After moving to Tahoe, Jeremy continued his obsession with riding. He continues to race mountain bikes and has racked up some impressive results in the expert class at the Downieville Classic and the Lost and Found Gravel Grinder. Jeremy authored Mountain Bike Tahoe which was published in 2017. Jeremy's riding statistics are eye-popping, to say the least. He rode over 5,000 miles in 2018 climbing nearly 600,000 feet. Oh yeah, he was also a sponsored skier for well over a decade. Jeremy has a very critical eye and is also good at breaking things. These are wonderful traits for bike testers.
All the models we tested are full suspension all mountain/trail bike models with relatively similar amounts of suspension travel, geometry, and wheel/tire size. The addition of a large battery and a small motor adds significant weight to an e-bike, and they generally weigh in the neighborhood of 50 lbs, approximately 20 pounds heavier than non-e-bikes, and the heavy weight of these bikes makes them more difficult to ride without the support of the pedal-assist motor.
As with most bikes on this list, the Norco Sight takes it's design cues from a non-motorized sibling. The regular Sight is an aggressive, all-mountain ride with a 160mm fork and 150mm of rear travel. The VLT electric version adds a Shimano STEPS E8000 motor and downtube integrated 630 Wh battery. The geometry is not the same as the unplugged Sight—due to the motor and battery—but still goes low and slack with a longer wheelbase for added stability. The 66 degree head tube angle, 440mm reach (size medium), and and 75 degree seat tube angle are what you would expect from such an aggressive bike. The SRAM GX Eagle drivetrain gives a wide gear range so you can shift down into a comfortable low gear before needing to move up to the next assistance level. The Code R brakes are powerful enough to handle the speeds that come from the forces of braking a 50 pound bike at high speed and they can be used lightly to maximize your control over the bike through turns. The Sight VLT is for hard-charging, technical riders who are looking for the fastest route down the mountain and want to turn around and ride back up to do it again.
The Moterra Neo is one of the shorter travel e-bikes we’ve tested. It has a 140mm Rockshox Pike fork and 130mm of rear travel. That was enough travel to handle everything we encountered on the trail and the shorter travel was welcome on less technical terrain. It uses a Bosch Performance Line CX motor with 500 Wh battery integrated into the downtube. In testing, we’ve found Bosch's E-MTB mode works very well, offering a quick and hearty kick when you need to accelerate quickly, but gentle assistance in tricky sections. The lower travel stopped the bike from bogging down in technical uphill rock gardens, making them easier to ride through, and the 160mm cranks also help to reduce pedal strikes so you can keep the power on. The agile handling and stable ride make it one of the easier e-bikes to adapt to, and one of the most versatile.
Our All Terrain electric fat bike is the ideal electric bike for hunting thanks to it’s whisper-quiet operation, 20+ mile range on throttle only and 28 mph top speed. The 4″ tires are ready to roll smoothly over all types of terrain from soft mud to deep snow. See how we’re quickly changing the game for hunters all across America with our affordable and high quality electric fat bike.

E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque, and others, like Bosch’s Active Line, are nearly silent. But, generally, all four make good options. Look for motor output (in torque), which will give you an idea of total power. Just like car engines, more torque equals more power off the line and more boost to your pedaling. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a more important figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a more accurate reflection of power (higher Wh equals bigger range).
Electric mountain bikes are here, growing in popularity, and despite some access concerns—and perhaps because of them—continue to get better, more enjoyable to ride. Their small motors help you ride faster, farther, and can making challenging climbs less daunting. We tested 10 of the most exciting new models to help you find the right one for you. Read quick reviews of top five options below, or scroll deeper for helpful buying advice and longer reviews of every option.
The RadCity is a bike that’s been optimized to help you conquer the urban landscape. A big 48V battery gives you an estimated range of between 25 and 45 miles of e-assist from the 750-watt motor, which packs enough acceleration to get you out of dicey situations in traffic. There’s also a wattmeter to help you manage your power consumption on the LCD display. A welded-on rear rack holds up to 60 pounds of cargo, and puncture-resistant Kenda K-Rad tires keep you rolling over precarious debris. Commuting essentials include lights (the tail light also functions as a brake light), fenders, and a rear-mount kickstand.
When it comes to the distance it can cover at a single charge, it really depends. For instance, if you live 13 miles from work and ride on a smooth, flat pavement, the bike has enough power to get you home. The battery level does decrease when the motor is under increased stress—like when you’re riding up a hilly terrain—but it quickly levels itself when you go back riding on a flat road surface.
In our head to head range test, the Rocky Mountain took the win by traveling 20 miles and 4,297 vertical feet. It is worth mentioning that our tester felt that he worked a little harder while range testing the Rocky Mountain than the other bikes we tested. The Giant wasn't far behind at 19.02 miles and 4,000 vertical feet, and the YT Decoy almost tied that with 19.01 miles and 4,039 vertical feet. The Specialized was nipping at their heels with 18.71 miles and 3,949 feet. The Ghost Hybride SL AMR was the least impressive with a range of just 16.75 miles and 3,559 vertical feet. The outlier in this comparison is the Bulls E-Stream with a 650Wh battery. We were not able to test the Bulls directly against these other competitors, but we did notice that you can ride it significantly farther than any of these other contenders. During one of our test rides, we rode the Bulls 24 miles and 4,500 vertical feet, and the battery still wasn't depleted. More battery storage equals longer rides; it's just that simple.
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