Merax is a brand that has been dominating the biking industry for a while now, and this electric mountain bike compliments the brands quality and desire to be one of the best brands. It is powered by a 350 Watt motor which gives the bike enough power to go anywhere. The bike functions in two modes; as an E-bike and on a PAS mode. It also has a 5 pedal assistant level which is a good way to enjoy different riding experiences.
Firstly this is not a motorcycle. I bought this to use as a daily commuter.I now have 1000 + miles on it. The pedal assist works fine and may be ok for leisurely riding but I just use the throttle and pedal. This is a great bike. Strong frame and wheels. Been in two crashes and no damage. The tires are nice off road tires and now live on my daughters mountain bike. I switched them out for high pressure road tires. Forget about the horn and light. They don't work. I am 6'1" 32" inseam and had to buy a longer seatpost($30) to fit this frame. 13miles each way commute. Battery life is fine. After the 26 mile round trip it has a little juice left but not enough for another ride to work. I would buy again.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs. 

Addmotor HITHOT is slightly more lightweight than the Addmotor MOTAN model. The range is less but it is still impressive, and it is a bike that is built for slightly lighter riding all round. It is still a great bike, with suspension features and a strongly built frame. This bike has the added safety of front and rear brakes to make sure you can stop when you need to, even if that is at short notice.
It was easy, good tools were shipped with the bike. The instructions are nearly useless, though. Like other reviews state, the front fork is backwards in the picture and shipped backwards. The disk brake should be on the port/left side. Flip the handlebar clasp around and leave the dirt guard facing forward. All the cables should flow naturally this way. Pedals were ok to put on, one of the pedals took a minute to get threaded but eventually got tightened.
Electric bikes are generally heavier than normal bikes. This is due to the battery packs and additional motors which usually makes them about 20 pounds heavier. The weight of the bike can mean better traction in downhill and better stability to the ground, while on the other end, they can make them hard to maneuver with on flat grounds. Therefore, the weight of the bike you get should be based on how and where you intend to use it. The best one to get should be one that is heavy yet have a motor that is powerful enough to support the weight.
Most brands list their bike's power, but avoid putting too much emphasis on the number— there is no standard for measuring this, so the performance can vary wildly. Every motor on our list is rated to a continuous, or nominal, power output of 250 watts. But even this number isn't always accurate. Instead, look for torque, which measures how much rotational force is being applied to move the motor. It's the oomph, grunt, or kick you feel when you step on the pedals. More torque means faster acceleration and increased assistance.
Rambo and Felt offer bikes with electric assist motors. The lithium ion batteries give you speeds of up to 20 mph and will travel 19 miles between charges on motor use alone. You can use the motor as a pedal assist if you like, which will give you even more distance on a battery. Sweating up a steep hill? Just switch on the motor for some assistance. There is some question about using the electric power on properties where no motorized vehicles are allowed, but a representative from Rambo told me the bike has been okayed by several state wildlife agencies.
Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.
I’m overwhelmed by all the options available. My wife and I would like to go to e-biking. Both age 72. Wife has arthritis and needs hydraulic brakes. I have no preference. At a minimum front suspension. Also would prefer a bike on the lighter side for both of us. Step thru is a necessity since our agility is waning. Front and rear lights with fenders. Very difficult to decipher quality, pricing, and reputation with so many mfgs. Pricing seems to be all over the map. Can you provide a recommendation for quality e-bikes less than $1000 with the options I mentioned above.
I bought this bike with intended use on my hunting farms. I’ve ridden it now off road several times, and to say I’m blown away, is an understatement. This bike simply blew me away on all fronts. The motor is super strong and pulls me around great. I’m 6’2 210 so I’m not a small guy either. Like others have said, if this thing doesn’t make you smile the first time you ride it, you’re just not a happy person!!!!
All Cannondale E-bikes have one thing in common — pure, visceral cycling performance. Our goal is to create bikes that are so rider-focused, so seamlessly integrated and so much damn fun to ride, that you forget you've got power assist, forget you're on an electric bike, forget everything except how good it feels to be on that bike, in that moment. If that sounds like your cup of tea, power up. Let's Ride. 

The bike has a maximum range of 20 miles before needing to recharge.  Keeping up with speed and battery life is a breeze with the Bafang LCD display that comes standard with this model. A durable aluminum alloy frame helps this bike take a beating and keep on going. The Stalker has an 8-speed transmission and a set of Tekro mechanical disc brakes that will give you full control over the bike. A pair of 20 inch by 4 inch tires will help you climb those steep hills and easily get down those muddy trails. 
Equipped with a high performance motor, this Ancheer Power Plus electric mountain bike has won accolades for its superior performance and unmatched reliability. It is built with a solid Aluminum alloy frame to keep it strong yet lightweight enough to maneuver with easily. It is everything one would want to get through any terrain and is excellent in every way imaginable.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs.
E-enduro bikes aren’t as different to regular bikes as one might imagine. All of the fundamentals are the same and by nailing the geometry and sizing Vitus has produced an amazing e-bike with the E-Sommet VR.Sure there are a couple of little things we’d probably change, like the STEPS Di2 mode shifter and rear tyre, but that’s about it. And given how much cheaper the Vitus is compared to the competition, you can easily afford to make these changes and even buy a spare battery. The E-Sommet VR is no golf buggy, but Vitus has it’s certainly hit a hole in one with this bike.

You'll have to wait until the fall to pick up one of Cannondale's new offerings, and it's clear that high-performance mountain e-bikes don't come cheap. The Habit NEO ranges from $5,500 to $7,000, and you're looking at between $6,000 to $9,000 for the Moterra line (the Moterra SE costs $8,500). These are for riders determined to overcome most any terrain and don't mind paying a premium.
The charts below show our recommended sizes based on height, but there are some other factors, like arm and leg length, that determine a great fit. That’s why you’ll see some overlap in our recommendations. Not every rider who’s 5´8˝, for example, will fit on the same size bike. The best way to find your perfect fit is to consult the experts at your local Trek retailer.

When you need a great electric mountain bike that will assure you of a longer runtime, you need to get this. The Cyclamatic Power Plus Electric bike comes with a powerful 36V lithium-ion battery. This works for up to 28 miles range; hence very convenient. Besides this, the e-bike also has a stylish design, which makes it ideal for riders. It can be used by 14 years and above. The bike also has large wheels, which makes it move with a lot of ease. It can maneuver easily on all terrains to assure you of an excellent and smooth ride.
So let's take a look at the fat tire electric hunting bikes on the list.  And this review has been updated to name a clear winner from the pack.  You can't go wrong with any of these three electric hunting bike brands but after the the last 12 months or so a clear winner has stood out so at the bottom of this review we name our favorite.  So first off we have.....
Merax Aluminum electric mountain bike is an excellent option if you are looking for a lightweight frame bike and a good suspension for smooth riding. This mountain ebike has standard Shimano 7 speed gears. Merax Aluminum electric mountain bike can develop the speed of maximum 32 km/h. The electric bike has a 350W high-speed motor and removable 36V 8.8Ah Lithium Battery. The battery allows you to ride a bike for up to 28 miles with a single charge of it. This electric mountain bike is also an excellent choice for those who are looking for an ergonomic design.
X-Treme Scooters Mountain Bike has a 300-watt motor that is designed for urban areas. It can easily climb the hills and has a soft and comfortable seat for long travel. It is equipped with a lithium-ion battery that can travel 25 miles in a charge. You can ride the bike using a motor as well as paddles. The features of this bike include front and rear brakes, 7 speed Shimano tourney gear shifter system, RST Capa T7 hydraulic front forks, adjustable seat, tool kit, headlight, battery indicator, cargo rack, and lightweight aluminum alloy frame.
This tricycle also has a large rear basket which is perfect for storage of just about anything including groceries, parcels, or to give your pet a ride. This electric tricycle is a great choice for anybody that wants to combine quick and easy travel plus help reduce pollution to the environment, just charge it up and you have a 25 mile travel distance which is fun and convenient.

Powered by a 250-watt Brose Centerdrive system, the Redux is capable of reaching speeds of up to 28 mph, which comes in handy when dodging traffic. The lithium-ion battery provides enough juice to give the bike a range of up to 80 miles between recharges, making it a great option for daily commuters. Raleigh even outfitted the bike with wide tires which provide stability and traction, even when the road gets wet. Other key features include a 10-speed Shimano crankset and shifters and a built-in LCD screen that displays all the usual information.


As long as you can do without some of the perks that pricier models offer—like a detailed display unit, integrated lights, and a torque-sensor motor—the August Live! LS is a solid, stable, comfortable, and really freakin’ cute (have you seen those polka-dot fenders?) e-bike. Its 8-speed twist shifter, chopper-style handlebar, Touch Down Geometry (for a more laid-back ride), and three levels of assist keep this bike within the realm of “cruiser.” But with a 250-watt Bafang rear-hub motor, a top pedal-assisted speed of 20 mph, and reliable disc brakes, the August is no joke. It’ll get you to the top of relatively steep climbs without forcing you out of the saddle, and it feels super stable on the way back down, too. It has a battery range of 20 miles, but that’s enough to take it where it’s happiest: tooling along at the beach, around town, and through the park.
I’m overwhelmed by all the options available. My wife and I would like to go to e-biking. Both age 72. Wife has arthritis and needs hydraulic brakes. I have no preference. At a minimum front suspension. Also would prefer a bike on the lighter side for both of us. Step thru is a necessity since our agility is waning. Front and rear lights with fenders. Very difficult to decipher quality, pricing, and reputation with so many mfgs. Pricing seems to be all over the map. Can you provide a recommendation for quality e-bikes less than $1000 with the options I mentioned above.
Chris McNamara spends a whole lot of time in the saddle. This rock climber turned mountain cyclist loves huge rides covering obscene distances. He is working on a few gigantic rides including a singletrack route around Lake Tahoe and a ride from South Lake Tahoe to Mammoth Lakes. Paul Tindal is a versatile rider who spent years in the elite ranks in the road, downhill and enduro disciplines. Paul is now the lead mechanic and shop manager at a busy bike shop in South Lake Tahoe. Joshua Hutchens has spent decades in the bike industry. He has been a racer, bike shop owner, mechanic, and a guide. Joshua has a great eye for the subtleties of a bicycle.
This eBike will help carry all your gear with a 300 pound load capacity. The Stalker 750 comes in two colors including Special Edition Kuiu Verde 2.0  and matte black.  Both colors schemes are perfect for staying concealed while out in the woods.  When you compare this 750-watt hunting eBike with other models on the market, you will see that it is superior in many different ways. 
Electric bikes (also known as e bikes) are perfect for long-distance riding, or when you just don’t feel like giving your full effort. What differentiates them from electric motorcycles is the ability for the rider to pedal the bike at any time, so if you’re riding along and your battery dies, you’re not going to stranded. These are often very valuable bikes, but some models can be more affordable than you might expect, especially when you treat them as a form of transportation as opposed to thinking of the price in terms of regular bicycles.

It was easy, good tools were shipped with the bike. The instructions are nearly useless, though. Like other reviews state, the front fork is backwards in the picture and shipped backwards. The disk brake should be on the port/left side. Flip the handlebar clasp around and leave the dirt guard facing forward. All the cables should flow naturally this way. Pedals were ok to put on, one of the pedals took a minute to get threaded but eventually got tightened.
To enjoy a great ride for long hours, this durable E-bike is one to try out. This is because the electric bike is powered by the 250W high-speed motor that aids in boosting the speed. Besides this, it has the 21-speed transmission system; hence you can easily shift the speeds to attain a higher speed. In addition to this, has the ideal brakes system that makes it very safe.
As with most bikes on this list, the Norco Sight takes it's design cues from a non-motorized sibling. The regular Sight is an aggressive, all-mountain ride with a 160mm fork and 150mm of rear travel. The VLT electric version adds a Shimano STEPS E8000 motor and downtube integrated 630 Wh battery. The geometry is not the same as the unplugged Sight—due to the motor and battery—but still goes low and slack with a longer wheelbase for added stability. The 66 degree head tube angle, 440mm reach (size medium), and and 75 degree seat tube angle are what you would expect from such an aggressive bike. The SRAM GX Eagle drivetrain gives a wide gear range so you can shift down into a comfortable low gear before needing to move up to the next assistance level. The Code R brakes are powerful enough to handle the speeds that come from the forces of braking a 50 pound bike at high speed and they can be used lightly to maximize your control over the bike through turns. The Sight VLT is for hard-charging, technical riders who are looking for the fastest route down the mountain and want to turn around and ride back up to do it again.
You'll have to wait until the fall to pick up one of Cannondale's new offerings, and it's clear that high-performance mountain e-bikes don't come cheap. The Habit NEO ranges from $5,500 to $7,000, and you're looking at between $6,000 to $9,000 for the Moterra line (the Moterra SE costs $8,500). These are for riders determined to overcome most any terrain and don't mind paying a premium.

When it comes to getting around in rough terrain all while not disturbing the wildlife, QuietKat bikes will get the job done!  With a large selection of fat tire electric bikes built specifically for hunting to choose from, it won't be hard for you to find one that fit your needs. So if you enjoy hunting, camping, or simply riding off the trail, one of these bikes will be perfect for you. Designed to carry heavy loads, these bikes are perfect for installing trail cameras or simply scouting the landscape. 
I continued to have issues with the rear brakes. The rear disc brake was bending when I braked and I could not figure out how to get it from rubbing on the pads. I eventually took the bike over to REI and paid for a tune-up. Fantastic work by them, the bike has a better top speed by a couple mph now and shifting/braking are much smoother. I was also having issues with the chain jumping off the front derailleur on high torque (high gear from standstill). Looks like I just needed the experts to give it the tune. 

Specialized has a celebrated history within the mountain biking scene, and they’ve elaborated on their well-rounded catalog with the addition of the Turbo Levo Comp. The Levo is a great alternative for those who are looking for all of the coveted characteristics of a proper trail bike, wrapped up with a slew of new, innovative technologies. Here, you’ll find a similar geometry to the company’s flagship Stumpjumper, albeit, with a redesigned alloy frame, improved kinematics, and internal cable routing to keep things nice and clean. In the bike’s most recent iteration, a Specialized 2.1 Rx trail-tuned motor has been implemented, providing instant engagement, unrivaled heat management, and consistent output throughout the Levo’s entire assisted range. When it comes to peripherals, a set of dependable SRAM accessories, a Praxis 2D cold-forged alloy crankset, and Roval Traverse 29 wheels round things out.

This is a question the designers and engineers of the FOCUS and BULLS bikes of this group test asked themselves. Instead of speccing them with the standard 500 Wh batteries, both have developed a sophisticated alternative. The idea: instead of riding around with unnecessarily large batteries and unnecessary weight on short tours, they integrated a smaller 375 Wh or 378 Wh battery into the bike. If you don’t have enough power for long loops, you can double the range of both bikes with an additional battery for up to a full 750 Wh. While the second battery is mounted in the front triangle of the FOCUS, it disappears sideways in the downtube of the BULLS. In practice, you’ll need the second battery relatively often with both bikes, and in either case, you should consider the additional € 499 investment in a second battery pack when you buy the bike.
As someone who owns both a Quest and Rift S I think this article misses the mark in a few areas: While the Quest technically has a higher resolution, it is a pentile display and as such is is more prone to godrays, glare and SDE. The overall resolution of the Rift S is lower but it has an RGB stripe display with more subpixels so side by side it actually looks sharper. Quest has 4 tracking cameras, Rift S has 5 so the overall area it can scan is greater and this makes a difference, especially in games where you lift your arms up and above your head. In order to move the data over the USB C wire the image will be compressed at the sides so it won't be as sharp or well defined as what you will see in the Rift S. In my experience, the Rift S refresh rate of 80hz is really the bottom end for comfortable VR experiences. When playing games that support cross buy or watching videos, I still experience discomfort on the Quest (especially during fast movement) whereas the same content feels perfect comfortable on my Rift S and even PSVR. This is more of a personal preference thing but I find the Rift S halo design far, far more comfortable to extended sessions that the Quest scuba mask design. So while it's impressive that the Quest will soon become a hybrid VR headset, let's not get carried away and just ignore its shortcomings and limitations. For the best PCVR experience a dedicated PCVR headset is still the way to go.

Specialized has e-bikes figured out. Its e-bikes are better looking and better sorted than almost anything else. This Turbo Levo has a clean interface: just a mode switch and a few LEDs for status. To dig deeper, you use Specialized’s Misson Control app, which lets the user customize the motor’s tune, and has a clever Smart Control mode. This mode lets the rider set and time or distance, and the amount of reserve they want to be left over. The app then automatically adjusts the motor’s output to meet those settings, reducing battery anxiety. The custom motor is extremely smooth and quiet, with awesome torque. We found the highest mode too powerful for finesse riding, but great for flying up smooth climbs and cutting time off transfers. The e-bike tuned RockShox fork is somewhat harsh, but the rest of the parts are excellent and suit the bike’s capabilities—something we can’t say that about every e-bike.

Jeremy Benson eats, sleeps, and breathes mountain bikes. This native New Englander started mountain biking in 1992. He got more serious in college and started racing bikes in 1999. After moving to Tahoe, Jeremy continued his obsession with riding. He continues to race mountain bikes and has racked up some impressive results in the expert class at the Downieville Classic and the Lost and Found Gravel Grinder. Jeremy authored Mountain Bike Tahoe which was published in 2017. Jeremy's riding statistics are eye-popping, to say the least. He rode over 5,000 miles in 2018 climbing nearly 600,000 feet. Oh yeah, he was also a sponsored skier for well over a decade. Jeremy has a very critical eye and is also good at breaking things. These are wonderful traits for bike testers.
Just like all Rambo models, this unit comes standard with a durable aluminum alloy 6061 frame.  This bike has an energy efficient 350-watt Bafang rear hub motor that is powered by a LG 36 volt 10.4AH battery.  The R35OJR comes in matte black and has a KT-LCD3 digital display that will allow you to keep up with important information such as the battery level. 
The Altitude Powerplay is one of three bikes on this list (Specialized Turbo Levo and Liv Intrigue E+ are the others) to use a custom motor. The Dyname 3.0 motor offers 100Nm of torque and is also compact enough that Rocky can use the same geometry and suspension-pivot placement as an unplugged Altitude, so the Powerplay feels more like an unplugged bike than most e-bikes. With the motor off it rides like a standard, albeit heavy, trail bike. The motor responds more quickly than some of the more popular systems and the increased torque offers increased acceleration, which, depending on the trail situation, can be welcome or a hindrance.
The above electric mountain bikes are the best selections on the market today. They are safe and durable bikes that will guarantee safe rides. They are also built from strong and sturdy metallic frames to offer long-term service. In addition to this, the electric bikes are ideal for riding on different terrains. This is due to large wheels, which provide smooth rides. They are also user-friendly electric bikes that are
This combination will give you a maximum unassisted speed of up to 19 MPH. Carrying a lot of gear will not be an issue with this eBike because it has a 300 pound weight capacity. This model also comes with an easy to read digital display that will give you better control of your eBike. Available in two different colors, black or camo will give hunters more options to choose from. 
Trevor Porter, Kona's e-bike manager, said that motors can demand longer chainstays and adding batteries to downtubes can require larger headtubes, increasing stack height. This is common across the range of e-mtbs we tested. The reach and head tube angle tend to remain similar to standard bikes, but the chainstay length, head tube length, and stack height are generally increased.
Wide tyres are an absolute must on an eMTB. They offer more traction, provide extra comfort, increase stability, and they simply look cooler. Tyres with a width of 2.5″ – 2.8″ have proven to be the ideal size. The performance of the MAXXIS Minion tyres is particularly impressive; they provide the best grip and stability. To get the best performance, tyres should be ridden at approx. 1.2 – 1.6 bar air pressure.
The NAKTO Electric Mountain Bike is one powerful bike that delivers great speed. It has the Shimano 6-speed system to allow for easy shifting of the breaks. Secondly, the bike also features the powerful 350W high-speed motor, which ensures that it delivers top-notch speed. You can always adjust the speed from 20-24 MPH. The elegant and body friendly design of the bike makes it suitable for all users. It is a more refined and humanized bike recommended by both experts and riders.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs.
A: Electric bikes are designed with compact electric motors which are usually attached to the back of the front wheel and housed in a hub. There are a number of controls with a user interface which is where all the motor operation is done by the rider. Here one can control the speed, braking and other things such as battery management. Some e-bikes have other electric components such as a sensor which also help in geometry and stabilization.
The Rad Power Bikes RadWagon is a remarkable value proposition: It sports a powerful 750-watt direct-drive hub motor, a 7-speed Shimano Altus drivetrain, a throttle, fenders, and integrated lights. After a couple months of testing, we can report that it hauls just as well as competitors that cost thousands more. Cost-saving measures include mechanical disc brakes and a cadence sensor (rather than a torque sensor). We got about 35 miles of range from the battery and discovered that changing the wheel size to 28 inches on the display unit increases the top (e-assisted) speed to 24 mph.

Another important element is the primary user interface or the controls. It should be user-friendly so that the rider can navigate the features easily. A straightforward control panel should not include anything more than a small, digital display with clear readings, ergonomic thumb shifters, and a charging connection. In fact, a thumb shifter is even better than electronic buttons, although some riders may disagree.
This trike can easily be an alternative to your car for local journeys, if you want to do grocery getting or commuting you can now ditch the car, save money on fuel costs, help the environment, and stay in shape (pedal assist modes) or just have more fun by using your electric power trike over the car and then, best of all, it will pay for itself over time.
The Surly Big Easy is the Cadillac of the bike lane. The company’s new longtail e-cargo bike exudes a “they don’t make ’em like this anymore” stature, thanks to a beefed-up chromoly steel frame rolling on tough 26x2.5-inch tires. And because it’s a class 1 e-bike, you can actually ride it in the bike lane, too. The 7-foot-long, 67-pound bike won’t play well with your third-floor walk-up, so it’s best to think of it as a car supplement or replacement—that’s what Surly intended, anyway, as evidenced by the $5,000 price tag. However, if you’re ready to commit to the cargo bike life, you’ll struggle to find a stronger platform for achieving bike commuter nirvana.
If you’re looking for even more performance and an even more refined bike, you’ll find what you’re looking for at Specialized. Their bike embodies the company slogan “Innovate or die” in a perfect way and is full of smart solutions. Many of them, such as the specially developed app for tuning the motor, the integration of the battery, and the small remote lever for selecting the support level, are obvious. Some, on the other hand, only become clear when you take a closer look – such as the Autosag valve on the shock for a simplified setup process, or the omission of a spoke magnet. The Levo also won us over with its outstanding riding characteristics, obviously. It rides comfortably, climbs quickly and efficiently, and has exactly the right mix of agility and stability. It’s the ultimate machine that promises to bring a huge smile to every rider’s face after just a few metres on board – no matter whether beginner or a pro. The Specialized Turbo Levo S-Works Carbon is currently the eMTB offering the best overall package, and thus the deserved Best in Test! The best eMTB of the 2018 season!
The electric mountain bikes are excellent bikes that deliver great speed and longer rides. This is due to the powerful battery that will assure you of longer runtime. The bikes also use the Shimano speeds, which allow you to easily shift the speeds. In addition to this, the electric mountain bike is also very safe due to the perfect braking system. This makes them safe for all riders. With the LED headlights, you will find them appropriate for night rides.
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A $1,500, fully loaded e-cargo bike seemed too good to be true, so we borrowed the RadWagon from Rad Power Bikes to see if it could stand up to competitors that cost thousands more. In short: it does. A 750-watt Shengyi direct-drive hub motor provides powerful pedal assist at a much quieter hum than the mid-drive motors used on most e-cargo bikes; its only disadvantage is there’s not quite as much torque, but you’ll only notice on steep hills. A throttle lets you ride the bike like a scooter, and we had no problems with the 7-speed Shimano Altus drivetrain or the Tektro mechanical disc brakes. Lights, fenders, and a kickstand are standard. Despite its length, the RadWagon isn’t difficult to maneuver: We thrashed it around an abandoned golf car path and didn’t scrape the rear foot platforms against the ground, a good sign for low-speed handling. It’s a lot easier to charge $5,000 or more for an e-cargo bike when you market it as a car replacement, but the RadWagon proves you can render your car mostly obsolete for the price of an e-bike, not another car.
Having a motor bolted to the bottom of a mountain bike that provides pedal assistance is an amazing leveller. The constant torque it applies to the chain rounds out the squarest of pedalling actions, which in turn helps stabilizes the rear suspension and counter pedal induced bob, seamlessly shifting your focus from pedalling efficiency to battery life.

Every bike on this list has been thoroughly evaluated and vetted by our team of test editors. We research the market, survey user reviews, speak with product managers and engineers, and use our own experience riding these bikes to determine the best options. Our team of experienced testers spent many hours and miles using these bikes for their intended purpose. We’ve commuted to and from work on them, used them to stock up on groceries and beer, tested their passenger-hauling capability, ridden them on questionable terrain to see how they handle, and run their batteries down to officially see how long they last on one charge. We evaluated them on performance, price, comfort, handling, value, reliability, fun, and overall e-factor to come up with this list of bikes that will best serve the needs of anyone looking to add a little pedal assist to their ride.


Its quiet motor is perfect for coming up on a kill without scaring animals away. You can travel up to 19 MPH on this bike, which means you’re not breaking a sweat zipping on and off roads (which is great for animals sensitive to human aromas). Not only that, but it can carry up to 300 lbs, which is great for hauling your hunt in without a car or dirt bike. At only 66lbs, the Rambo R750XP is one of the lightest yet hardest performing e-bikes we’ve seen- definitely consider this bike if you plan on carrying lots around with you on your next trip.

Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.


Unlike the manual mountain bikes where you would have to fully rely on pedaling, electric mountain bikes depend on an electric charge. As expected, the bike has a battery, which often determines how far one can go on a single charge. A good electric mountain bike should have a good storage capacity. Although most mountain bikes have nearly the same battery storage capacity, it is not uncommon to find one that falls below par. It is also good to know how it performs and uses the battery under different weather conditions terrain and depending on the rider’s weight.


The Class 3 Aventon Pace 500 urban e-bike has five levels of pedal assist and tops out at 28 mph. But the Pace has something not found on a lot of modern e-bikes. In addition to pedal power, it also has a throttle—in the case of the Pace, a small thumb paddle on the left side of the handlebar next to the control unit that holds a steady 20 mph, no pedaling required. The bike itself has an aluminum frame, a swept-back handlebar, ergo grips, a sturdy kickstand, hydraulic disc brakes, 8-speed Shimano Altus shifting and gearing, 27.5x2.2-inch Kenda e-bike-rated tires, a saddle the size of Texas, and good ol’ classic city/commuter-bike geometry. It doesn’t come equipped with fenders or a rear rack, but you can add them. Power comes in the form of a 500-watt rear-hub motor and a semi-integrated battery on the down tube (with a range of up to 50 miles); a backlit display unit mounted on the stem shows your speed and distance and tells you how much juice you have left.
Achesin electric mountain bike is designed with an ergonomic design that makes it very stable and easy to ride. Like most of the mountain bikes, this one is built with a good double-layered aluminum alloy wheel which makes it easy to maneuver, lightweight and durable. With its powerful motor and battery system, you can easily cover between 25 to 50 kilometers depending on the nature of the terrain.
Over several months, our team of four professional mountain bike testers rode each of the electric mountain bikes in our test selection on a variety of trails and terrain in a range of weather conditions. We had each tester ride each of the bikes numerous times, often riding the different models back to back for the sake of comparison. We didn't go easy on them. Instead, we treated them all as if they were our own, putting them all through the wringer to identify their strengths and weaknesses. We scrutinized every aspect of each e-bike's performance and scored them all on several rating metrics, e-bike controls, downhill performance, uphill performance, power output, and distance range. Each of these metrics is described in greater detail below. It is important to note that during our testing, our impressions of these e-bikes changed dramatically. Our first impressions didn't exactly stick. It was essential for us to test the different models head-to-head and make direct comparisons to flush out the differences.
This utilitarian Class 3 (28 mph) road e-bike is smooth and torquey thanks to its Bosch Performance Speed motor. With a drop bar and traditional road-bike position and handling, the CrossRip+ is more suited to long rides on mixed terrain than navigating congested city streets. It comes with a rear rack—for mounting bags, not for attaching cargo directly—full fenders, a kickstand, and integrated front and rear lights (which are powered by the Bosch 500Wh battery). It features a SRAM Force 1x11 drivetrain, hydraulic disc brakes, and wide 700x38mm tires.
You'll have to wait until the fall to pick up one of Cannondale's new offerings, and it's clear that high-performance mountain e-bikes don't come cheap. The Habit NEO ranges from $5,500 to $7,000, and you're looking at between $6,000 to $9,000 for the Moterra line (the Moterra SE costs $8,500). These are for riders determined to overcome most any terrain and don't mind paying a premium.
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