Every bike on this list has been thoroughly evaluated and vetted by our team of test editors. We research the market, survey user reviews, speak with product managers and engineers, and use our own experience riding these bikes to determine the best options. Our team of experienced testers spent many hours and miles using these bikes for their intended purpose. We’ve commuted to and from work on them, used them to stock up on groceries and beer, tested their passenger-hauling capability, ridden them on questionable terrain to see how they handle, and run their batteries down to officially see how long they last on one charge. We evaluated them on performance, price, comfort, handling, value, reliability, fun, and overall e-factor to come up with this list of bikes that will best serve the needs of anyone looking to add a little pedal assist to their ride.
There are few pastimes that reenergize the human spirit quite like a trip into the great outdoors — especially when you’re tearing down a trail at Mach 4 atop a fully-outfitted Enduro bike. It’s no secret that the insane individuals who spend their off-hours charting, traversing, and descending mountains at breakneck speeds are among the most well-rounded, athletically-inclined thrill-seekers in the world, but sometimes, even they need a break from the grind.
The frame itself incorporates a series of mounts allowing you to easily trick-out the Road E+1 with a rack, fenders, or panniers to more aptly meet your touring requirements. Again, most touring purists will certainly scoff at the mere notion of pedal-assistance, however, individuals looking for more of a guided tour and less of a tour de force will swoon over the Road E+1.
At 42 pounds for a size medium frame (exceptionally light for an urban e-bike), this step-through model’s silent, mid-drive Bosch Active Line motor provides pedal assist up to 20 mph. And its 400Wh battery lasts a (claimed) 30 miles to a whopping 110 miles, depending on e-assist mode, speed, terrain, rider weight, and cargo. With 26-inch wheels, 2-inch tires, round aluminum tubes, a swept-back handlebar, Shimano Sora 9-speed components, and an 11-32 cassette, the Parkway looks like an everyday, non-motorized city bike at first glance. But with an array of Bosch e-components—motor, battery, and Purion display—it has the zip to take you farther, faster.
Due to high total weights of over 20 kg, it doesn’t matter whether the scale stops at 21.44 kg or 22.2 kg for a modern eMTB. In our test, the difference between the lightest and the heaviest bike was just under 4 kg. This is not to be ignored… but a little extra weight in the form of functional, reliable componentry is better than an ebike designed and constructed to be as light as possible, at all costs, but which ends up in the workshop more often than on the trail.
Specialized has a celebrated history within the mountain biking scene, and they’ve elaborated on their well-rounded catalog with the addition of the Turbo Levo Comp. The Levo is a great alternative for those who are looking for all of the coveted characteristics of a proper trail bike, wrapped up with a slew of new, innovative technologies. Here, you’ll find a similar geometry to the company’s flagship Stumpjumper, albeit, with a redesigned alloy frame, improved kinematics, and internal cable routing to keep things nice and clean. In the bike’s most recent iteration, a Specialized 2.1 Rx trail-tuned motor has been implemented, providing instant engagement, unrivaled heat management, and consistent output throughout the Levo’s entire assisted range. When it comes to peripherals, a set of dependable SRAM accessories, a Praxis 2D cold-forged alloy crankset, and Roval Traverse 29 wheels round things out. 

Addmotor MOTAN electric mountain bike is a big bike built for big biking appetites. It goes fast, it lasts for a long time, and it means business. The thick tires can manage rough roads and tracks, making it the ultimate off-road bike. It is fully adjustable for different heights and shapes and sizes and is made with a tough frame to support anything.
The Surly Big Easy is the Cadillac of the bike lane. The company’s new longtail e-cargo bike exudes a “they don’t make ’em like this anymore” stature, thanks to a beefed-up chromoly steel frame rolling on tough 26x2.5-inch tires. And because it’s a class 1 e-bike, you can actually ride it in the bike lane, too. The 7-foot-long, 67-pound bike won’t play well with your third-floor walk-up, so it’s best to think of it as a car supplement or replacement—that’s what Surly intended, anyway, as evidenced by the $5,000 price tag. However, if you’re ready to commit to the cargo bike life, you’ll struggle to find a stronger platform for achieving bike commuter nirvana.
Chris McNamara spends a whole lot of time in the saddle. This rock climber turned mountain cyclist loves huge rides covering obscene distances. He is working on a few gigantic rides including a singletrack route around Lake Tahoe and a ride from South Lake Tahoe to Mammoth Lakes. Paul Tindal is a versatile rider who spent years in the elite ranks in the road, downhill and enduro disciplines. Paul is now the lead mechanic and shop manager at a busy bike shop in South Lake Tahoe. Joshua Hutchens has spent decades in the bike industry. He has been a racer, bike shop owner, mechanic, and a guide. Joshua has a great eye for the subtleties of a bicycle.

This is a question the designers and engineers of the FOCUS and BULLS bikes of this group test asked themselves. Instead of speccing them with the standard 500 Wh batteries, both have developed a sophisticated alternative. The idea: instead of riding around with unnecessarily large batteries and unnecessary weight on short tours, they integrated a smaller 375 Wh or 378 Wh battery into the bike. If you don’t have enough power for long loops, you can double the range of both bikes with an additional battery for up to a full 750 Wh. While the second battery is mounted in the front triangle of the FOCUS, it disappears sideways in the downtube of the BULLS. In practice, you’ll need the second battery relatively often with both bikes, and in either case, you should consider the additional € 499 investment in a second battery pack when you buy the bike.
Electric Hybrid Bikes- As the name suggests, these bikes combine the properties of mountain and fat-tire bikes. They are built to be fast and tough at the same time. They are lighter than electric mountain bikes, so you don’t have to deal with the excess weight when going up hills. You can use the bike to carry heavy luggage or cycle through rough trails.
The frame itself incorporates a series of mounts allowing you to easily trick-out the Road E+1 with a rack, fenders, or panniers to more aptly meet your touring requirements. Again, most touring purists will certainly scoff at the mere notion of pedal-assistance, however, individuals looking for more of a guided tour and less of a tour de force will swoon over the Road E+1. 

This 3-speed bike comes with a nice sized digital display that will be easy to read even in low-light conditions.  The bikes can reach a maximum speed of 19 MPH and has a range of 20 miles without having to pedal.  This impressive range is due to the fact that this bike comes with a long-lasting 48v/11.6ah Panasonic battery which can be quickly recharged. 
Both options are great, while the derailleur will give you more options to choose from when climbing hills the rear cog is an internal component with less moving parts so it's a fraction quieter and requires no oiling or regular maintenance, some prefer the rear cog as it's one less component to get snagged in the thick brush but that is almost never an issue.  whichever system you choose you will have fun!

E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque, and others, like Bosch’s Active Line, are nearly silent. But, generally, all four make good options. Look for motor output (in torque), which will give you an idea of total power. Just like car engines, more torque equals more power off the line and more boost to your pedaling. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a more important figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a more accurate reflection of power (higher Wh equals bigger range).

The original Power Plus model was one of the most popular in its class, introducing the joy and practicalities of e-bikes to a huge audience around the world.  The CX1 builds on that success, adding a NEW more powerful brushless motor, a NEW upgraded battery, a 21-speed gear system, and improved reliability.  The steel frame, strong brakes, suspension and quick-shift gears offer all the qualities of a premium mountain bike with the added feature of three pedal assist modes.


The Ultra Mid Drive Bafang motor is the best motor there is and due to it’s high cost most other brands have not adopted it yet. The ‘Ultra’ has torque sensors built in so it knows how much power to give you based on how much pressure you are applying to the pedals, so it intelligently gives you the right amount of power when you need it most and not a predetermined power regardless of what terrain you’re tackling, so you have more control.

Keeping track of speed and battery life will be easy because this bike comes with a Bafang LCD color display.  This eBike can stop on a dime by utilizing a set of powerful hydraulic disc brakes.  Built to last, this model comes with a strong aluminum alloy frame.  Driving the Storm down hard to reach trails and other backwoods locations will be a smooth ride thanks to the Shimano Altus 8-speed gearing system. 
Wide tyres are an absolute must on an eMTB. They offer more traction, provide extra comfort, increase stability, and they simply look cooler. Tyres with a width of 2.5″ – 2.8″ have proven to be the ideal size. The performance of the MAXXIS Minion tyres is particularly impressive; they provide the best grip and stability. To get the best performance, tyres should be ridden at approx. 1.2 – 1.6 bar air pressure.
Powered by a 250-watt Brose Centerdrive system, the Redux is capable of reaching speeds of up to 28 mph, which comes in handy when dodging traffic. The lithium-ion battery provides enough juice to give the bike a range of up to 80 miles between recharges, making it a great option for daily commuters. Raleigh even outfitted the bike with wide tires which provide stability and traction, even when the road gets wet. Other key features include a 10-speed Shimano crankset and shifters and a built-in LCD screen that displays all the usual information.
This duo of battery and motor will give you a maximum speed of 19 MPH unassisted and a range of 20 miles without pedaling.  A bright digital display will help you to keep up with your distance and speed along with the current battery level.  A thumb throttle makes driving this fat tire electric hunting bike fun and easy.  This bike has a maximum carrying capacity of 300 pounds which is perfect for the avid hunter. 
Additionally, it features the Shimano 7-speed shifting system, making it easier to attain a higher speed. It is a reliable bike with two working modes. With this, you can pedal it whenever it runs out of power. The powerful e-bike is able to move at a speed of 32km/h and can move for 22-28 miles on a single charge. The padded and comfortable saddle is easily adjustable for your riding height. You can also adjust the handlebars for a more comfy ride.
While it was agile and quicker handling, the Specialized Turbo Levo Comp didn't run away from the competition in this rating metric due to the somewhat abrupt pedal assist cutoff that occurred the moment you stop pedaling. This power cutoff caused awkward moves in slower technical uphill sections when jockeying pedals to avoid rock strikes. The Bulls E-Stream had power for days and could mash its way up just about anything, but its overall weight and size made it a little more awkward in slower or more technical sections of climbing. The Trek Powerfly had a long wheelbase, reach, and chainstay length, giving the bike a long rear end that kept impressive traction while climbing as long as you kept your momentum, the overall length of the bike, however, made it a little tougher to negotiate in the tighter stuff.
The newest electric mountain bike from Ancheer provides the joy of mountain biking with some advanced features that make it more enjoyable and let the riders to have the control of their rides. At less than $800 price and with mid-range features, it may not compete with the XF800 or BAFAG models, but it provides good value for the money, nonetheless. What is the best electric mountain bike?
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