The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.

https://electricbikereview.com/giant/... The Giant Dirt-E+ 1 is a full suspension electric mountain bike with capable hardware, excellent dealer support and impressive range, four frame sizes accommodate a range of riders, impressive pricepoint. 22-speed drivetrain with Shimano Deore XT Shadow Plus allows you to engage a clutch to tighten the chain and bolster shifting (important given the 80 Nm peak motor torque rating). Custom battery pack design fits neatly into the downtube but can be charged on or off the frame, compact display and button pad were large enough to read and press but stayed out of the way. Stiff thru-axles with boost hubs (longer than normal) support 2.6" tires, tapered head tube and ebike specific suspension from Fox is stiff, Maestro suspension design improves stopping and reduces bob.

If you are looking for a combination of durability and affordability, then look no further than BackCountry eBikes.  BackCountry eBikes ( aka BAKCOU ) is newer to the electric hunting eBike market but they have done so much for the industry in a short amount of time.  Each bike that they produce is made from the highest quality materials and are more affordable than both Rambo Bikes and QuietKat. 
The above electric mountain bikes are the best selections on the market today. They are safe and durable bikes that will guarantee safe rides. They are also built from strong and sturdy metallic frames to offer long-term service. In addition to this, the electric bikes are ideal for riding on different terrains. This is due to large wheels, which provide smooth rides. They are also user-friendly electric bikes that are
Ebike’s are much faster than walking in and out of your hunting area: It may be a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised how many people think hunting means either riding gas-powered bike or walking. But with an e-bike, there’s no need to strap everything to your back and go back to your campsite or car. With a rack on the front or the back of an e-bike, you can throw your gear and your kill on your bike and get going.
Other than your battery indicator all other info is shown on your display. In terms of position of display it looks ok. You can scroll around using +/- buttons on left side of your handlebar. It isn’t super ergonomic but still better than Haibike in terms of ease of use. The display can be removed so you won’t need to worry about it when you park your e-bike outside.
Bottom Line The Specialized Turbo Levo Comp returns to our e-bike test with a well rounded performance that earns it our Editor's Choice Award, again. The Bulls E-Stream Evo AM 4 is a brawler on the descents with an impressive distance range thanks to its large battery storage capacity. The YT Decoy is an aggressive e-bike with an enduro attitude. The Giant Trance E+ 2 Pro is well rounded and reasonably priced earning it our Best Buy Award. The Instinct Powerplay Alloy 50 is close to greatness but is held back by its controls and components.
X-Treme Scooters Folding Electric Mountain E-Bike offers a comfortable ride with front and rear suspension. It is an ideal bike for the college students, campers, and anyone who wants a portable and lightweight mode of transportation. This E-bike works on a motor of 300 watts. The best thing about this bike is it allows you to fold it after reaching the destination. It gives you a speed of about 20 mph with a 7-speed Shimano tourney gears. You can adjust the seat according to your ease.
Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.
This eBike will help carry all your gear with a 300 pound load capacity. The Stalker 750 comes in two colors including Special Edition Kuiu Verde 2.0  and matte black.  Both colors schemes are perfect for staying concealed while out in the woods.  When you compare this 750-watt hunting eBike with other models on the market, you will see that it is superior in many different ways. 
Many years of experience have clearly shown that it isn’t possible to make a universal and realistic estimate of an ebike’s range. The range of an eMTB depends on countless factors such as the support level, terrain, rider weight, environmental conditions, and cadence. Those who demand a lot of power from the motor consume a lot of electricity. If you want to travel far, you’ll have to save battery power. Read more about this topic in our article The truth about lab tests.
By Max Shumpert: This article has been updated to reflect the most accurate information regarding best e-bikes available for those who are interested in new technology combined with traditional bikes. The best 5 available have changed, and information has been added to assist individuals in finding the best electric bicycles currently available on the market. The FAQ has also been updated.
Fat bikes are the go-to machine in the world of mountain biking. It adds spice to the fat biking experience if it’s an e-fat bike. The Cyrusher XF800 is an impressive e-fat bike that is equipped with top-notch features. With a bombproof build and discreetly housed battery, the XF800 provides all-day action. It can take absolute beatings uphill or down with the beefed-up components.
Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position.

The ECOTRIC Fat Tire electric bike ticks all the boxes for potential and pro mountain bikers alike. It is designed for and therefore equipped to deal with any number of different terrains including the beach and dirt roads also. Consequently, you can take the bike with you anywhere with ease and the comfort of knowing it won’t let you down as it goes, not just on your mountain biking adventures!
Unlike the manual mountain bikes where you would have to fully rely on pedaling, electric mountain bikes depend on an electric charge. As expected, the bike has a battery, which often determines how far one can go on a single charge. A good electric mountain bike should have a good storage capacity. Although most mountain bikes have nearly the same battery storage capacity, it is not uncommon to find one that falls below par. It is also good to know how it performs and uses the battery under different weather conditions terrain and depending on the rider’s weight.
The Super Commuter is aptly named. The 350w Bosch motor sustains speeds up to 28mph, and the burly, 2.4-inch-wide Schwalbe Super Moto-X 650b tires keep you secure on even the roughest city streets. Shimano Deore hydraulic brakes provide ample stopping power. Fenders protect you from road spray so you arrive at your destination fresh. Integrated lights are critical for post-sunset riding, and a side-view mirror hanging on the left side of the handlebar gives a great view of traffic around you. Best of all, you can ride at the speed of urban traffic on the Super Commuter.

Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position.


Trevor Porter, Kona's e-bike manager, said that motors can demand longer chainstays and adding batteries to downtubes can require larger headtubes, increasing stack height. This is common across the range of e-mtbs we tested. The reach and head tube angle tend to remain similar to standard bikes, but the chainstay length, head tube length, and stack height are generally increased.

Now that we have learned all about the amazing eBikes that are perfect for hunting, we will take a look at some handy bike trailers.  As a hunter, you know all too well that you probably can’t fit all your gear on your eBike so having a bike trailer to help bring your gear up the trail is vital.  Additionally, these trailers made by QuietKat and Rambo are great for bringing back big game such as deer. 
Moreover, the ergonomic bike has a large wheel of about 26-inches, which makes the ride smooth irrespective of the terrain. It is a great electric bike that is suitable for cycling even at night hours due to the 10W efficient electric headlight. With the high grade cushioning effect and adjustable seat, it is an excellent electric bike suited for all users. The E-bike also has the anti-slip and wear resistant tires, which makes it highly reliable and safe.
This utilitarian Class 3 (28 mph) road e-bike is smooth and torquey thanks to its Bosch Performance Speed motor. With a drop bar and traditional road-bike position and handling, the CrossRip+ is more suited to long rides on mixed terrain than navigating congested city streets. It comes with a rear rack—for mounting bags, not for attaching cargo directly—full fenders, a kickstand, and integrated front and rear lights (which are powered by the Bosch 500Wh battery). It features a SRAM Force 1x11 drivetrain, hydraulic disc brakes, and wide 700x38mm tires.

You'll have to wait until the fall to pick up one of Cannondale's new offerings, and it's clear that high-performance mountain e-bikes don't come cheap. The Habit NEO ranges from $5,500 to $7,000, and you're looking at between $6,000 to $9,000 for the Moterra line (the Moterra SE costs $8,500). These are for riders determined to overcome most any terrain and don't mind paying a premium.
Pros versatile, fits water bottle, least e-bike looking, good battery life, low center of gravity Good controls, huge distance range, confidence inspiring at speed, good component spec Very nice build, stealthy looks, hard-charging downhill performance Reasonably priced, good distance range, well rounded performance, solid component spec Smooth and consistent power output, modern geometry,
Firstly this is not a motorcycle. I bought this to use as a daily commuter.I now have 1000 + miles on it. The pedal assist works fine and may be ok for leisurely riding but I just use the throttle and pedal. This is a great bike. Strong frame and wheels. Been in two crashes and no damage. The tires are nice off road tires and now live on my daughters mountain bike. I switched them out for high pressure road tires. Forget about the horn and light. They don't work. I am 6'1" 32" inseam and had to buy a longer seatpost($30) to fit this frame. 13miles each way commute. Battery life is fine. After the 26 mile round trip it has a little juice left but not enough for another ride to work. I would buy again.
For anyone looking for the best electric mountain bikes, it is advisable to consider the key features of the bike. Some of the main features to look out for include the battery life, which should offer 4-6 hours of runtime. Besides this, the motor is another essential consideration to look out for. There are bikes with up to 500W motors while others are powered by 350W and 250W. You also need to consider the tire sizes, the braking system for safety, and the saddle height, which needs to be adjusted. Lastly, also look out for the working modes, cost, and warranty of the bike.
The NAKTO Electric Mountain Bike is one powerful bike that delivers great speed. It has the Shimano 6-speed system to allow for easy shifting of the breaks. Secondly, the bike also features the powerful 350W high-speed motor, which ensures that it delivers top-notch speed. You can always adjust the speed from 20-24 MPH. The elegant and body friendly design of the bike makes it suitable for all users. It is a more refined and humanized bike recommended by both experts and riders.

It offers three levels of pedal assist modes which are eco, trail and turbo. At Turbo it is very easy to reach 20 mph speed but at eco mode it seems you need to do the most of work to be able to reach 20 mph speed. It has no problem on climbing most hills especially at turbo mode but on certain steep hills you may need to lower your gear. What sets Specialized apart from other electric mountainbikes is not it’s pure power of motor but how smooth is their motor.


The Pivot Shuttle breaks the e-mountain bike mold. It’s Shimano Di2-equipped and features a carbon fiber frame with 140mm of rear travel, a 150mm fork, and a 150mm dropper post. A Shimano STePS e8000 drive unit, paired with a 500Wh battery, provides 20 mph of pedal assist, so you can skip the lift line when you hit the bike park and zip right to the good stuff. The 27.5-inch wheels are nimble and eat up nearly anything in their path, and the massive 2.8-inch tires have huge knobs that grip the trail like Velcro.
The Riese & Müller bills its Load Touring HS as “the ultimate minivan of e-bikes” and the claim holds up. With a low center of gravity (aided by the 20-inch front and 26-inch rear wheels), the Load is easy to handle. Tektro hydraulic disc brakes add control, and front and rear suspension provide comfort. The Bosch motor offers an assist up to 275 percent of your effort until you hit 28 mph, when it cuts out. Two 500Wh batteries give you 12 hours or more of range at full power. It’s capable of toting up to 220 pounds of pets, people, and less-animate cargo. R&M also sells a double child seat for kids up to age 6 and a child-seat fastener for your youngest passengers.
E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque, and others, like Bosch’s Active Line, are nearly silent. But, generally, all four make good options. Look for motor output (in torque), which will give you an idea of total power. Just like car engines, more torque equals more power off the line and more boost to your pedaling. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a more important figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a more accurate reflection of power (higher Wh equals bigger range).
The easy-to-operate throttle makes traveling at an exact speed a cinch, plus disc brakes on both the front and rear wheels offer the control you need to navigate tricky terrain. The seat is adjustable to accommodate various-sized riders. The lithium battery charger completely recharges an empty battery in 6 hours. QuietKat includes a lifetime warranty against defective workmanship for the frame. All other components have a one-year warranty.
Testers found the Rocky Mountain Instinct Powerplay to perform relatively well on the climbs. The steep seat tube made for a comfortable climbing position and the powerful pedal-assist drive unit felt dialed. Its traction could be improved with beefier tires, and the weight of the bike feels centered a little higher than the competition resulting in some awkward handling at lower speeds. The Giant Trance E+ is also a competent climber, with ground-hugging Maestro suspension, comfortable geometry, and plenty of power on tap when you need it. The YT Decoy CF Pro has plenty of power, but it seems clear that this bike was designed for the descents. The Decoy still climbs relatively well, but testers found the low bottom bracket height made it more prone to pedal strikes than other competitors. Our least favorite bike on the climbs was the Ghost Hybride SL AMR. The Ghost has solid geometry numbers, but the pedal assistance felt less powerful and was definitely less consistent than the competition.
A: Electric bikes are designed with compact electric motors which are usually attached to the back of the front wheel and housed in a hub. There are a number of controls with a user interface which is where all the motor operation is done by the rider. Here one can control the speed, braking and other things such as battery management. Some e-bikes have other electric components such as a sensor which also help in geometry and stabilization. 

A $1,500, fully loaded e-cargo bike seemed too good to be true, so we borrowed the RadWagon from Rad Power Bikes to see if it could stand up to competitors that cost thousands more. In short: it does. A 750-watt Shengyi direct-drive hub motor provides powerful pedal assist at a much quieter hum than the mid-drive motors used on most e-cargo bikes; its only disadvantage is there’s not quite as much torque, but you’ll only notice on steep hills. A throttle lets you ride the bike like a scooter, and we had no problems with the 7-speed Shimano Altus drivetrain or the Tektro mechanical disc brakes. Lights, fenders, and a kickstand are standard. Despite its length, the RadWagon isn’t difficult to maneuver: We thrashed it around an abandoned golf car path and didn’t scrape the rear foot platforms against the ground, a good sign for low-speed handling. It’s a lot easier to charge $5,000 or more for an e-cargo bike when you market it as a car replacement, but the RadWagon proves you can render your car mostly obsolete for the price of an e-bike, not another car.
All the models we tested are full suspension all mountain/trail bike models with relatively similar amounts of suspension travel, geometry, and wheel/tire size. The addition of a large battery and a small motor adds significant weight to an e-bike, and they generally weigh in the neighborhood of 50 lbs, approximately 20 pounds heavier than non-e-bikes, and the heavy weight of these bikes makes them more difficult to ride without the support of the pedal-assist motor.

Before we get into the review, we would like to tell you about our new print edition. Consisting of around 240 (!) pages, the 2019 E-MOUNTAINBIKE Print Editon offers a ton of inspiration, buyers advice, and eMTB know-how as well as reviews of the hottest bikes of the year. Our premium magazine is aimed at experienced eMTBers and beginners alike. Click here for more information (new window) or order it directly in our shop or on Amazon.de!
One of the primary purposes of an e-bike is transferring power from the motor to the drivetrain to "support" your regular pedal stroke. All of the different drive units do this in relatively the same way, although subtle differences in their power output make them all feel slightly different. It is important to note that all of these systems work pretty well; the differences between them are relatively subtle but noticeable. We tested this metric primarily based on feel, as opposed to any sort of scientific measurement, and our testers could all notice the differences between the various models. All of the e-bikes we tested have several support modes offering varying levels of pedal assist support.

Our team of experienced testers rode them for weeks on our local trails—everything from flow trails, to technical singletrack, to our enduro courses. We self-shuttled DH runs and hit the bike path. To understand the differences between them, we rode them back to back on similar trails. We tested them against standard bikes on the same trails in the same conditions. And to evaluate their range, we charged them all and ran them on full power until their batteries flickered and died.
The bike shows greater terrain adaptability with the 300W brushless motor and 36V Li-ion battery. The 6-speed Shimano gears provide further range variation. You can select any one from the five levels of PAS but the level one or two assist is perfect for cycling on most tracks. Be careful that there will be little pedal resistance at higher levels. You can also twist the variable speed throttle instead of selecting the pedal assistance.
Many years of experience have clearly shown that it isn’t possible to make a universal and realistic estimate of an ebike’s range. The range of an eMTB depends on countless factors such as the support level, terrain, rider weight, environmental conditions, and cadence. Those who demand a lot of power from the motor consume a lot of electricity. If you want to travel far, you’ll have to save battery power. Read more about this topic in our article The truth about lab tests.

I continued to have issues with the rear brakes. The rear disc brake was bending when I braked and I could not figure out how to get it from rubbing on the pads. I eventually took the bike over to REI and paid for a tune-up. Fantastic work by them, the bike has a better top speed by a couple mph now and shifting/braking are much smoother. I was also having issues with the chain jumping off the front derailleur on high torque (high gear from standstill). Looks like I just needed the experts to give it the tune.
Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.
Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.

The majority of electric bikes will be fitted and made with front and rear brakes, which provide extra safety and extra stopping power. Fewer of these bikes will be equipped with brakes that are quick stopping. This is an additional safety feature, on some bikes but not all, that is highly recommended for you to look for in your electric mountain bike purchase.
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years.
Carry Extra Gear - They are built to carry 300lbs and if that’s not enough the trailers can carry an additional 100lbs so you can make it one quick effortless trip in and out instead of a tiring back and forth lugging heavy gear on your back.  Plus the bunch of other accessories available like rear racks and waterproof saddle bags for extra storage on the bike and not on your back.
Cannondale has electrified a significant chunk of its bicycle lineup, and now it's determined to conquer the mountain biking world in earnest. The company has unveiled a redesigned Moterra e-bike for the harsher climbs and a brand new Habit NEO (below) that's designed for "fast and flowy" rides -- say, a trip through a winding forest instead of an arduous hill climb. Both bikes aim to make electric riding easier than before, including through raw power.
Its quiet motor is perfect for coming up on a kill without scaring animals away. You can travel up to 19 MPH on this bike, which means you’re not breaking a sweat zipping on and off roads (which is great for animals sensitive to human aromas). Not only that, but it can carry up to 300 lbs, which is great for hauling your hunt in without a car or dirt bike. At only 66lbs, the Rambo R750XP is one of the lightest yet hardest performing e-bikes we’ve seen- definitely consider this bike if you plan on carrying lots around with you on your next trip.
An aluminum alloy 6061 frame will hold up well against the elements and you will never have to worry about your bike rusting.  Stay hidden in the woods with True Timber Viper Western pain pattern.  This eBike features a strong Bafang 750W BBSH02 High Torque Mid Drive motor that will help you traverse difficult trails with ease.  The Panasonic 48V 11.6AH battery will allow you to travel up to 20 miles without the need to pedal.  It also has a maximum speed of 19MPH unassisted. 
Despite it's prodigious descending talents the short (426mm) chainstays make tight corners and lifting the front end easy. That also makes flying through flow trails and popping off rocks a staple of the Altitude's arsenal. With uncompromised suspension and geometry, a powerful motor and big battery, and excellent trail manners, the Rocky offers a compellingly unique e-package that performs well in all situations.

This eBike will help carry all your gear with a 300 pound load capacity. The Stalker 750 comes in two colors including Special Edition Kuiu Verde 2.0  and matte black.  Both colors schemes are perfect for staying concealed while out in the woods.  When you compare this 750-watt hunting eBike with other models on the market, you will see that it is superior in many different ways. 
This trike can easily be an alternative to your car for local journeys, if you want to do grocery getting or commuting you can now ditch the car, save money on fuel costs, help the environment, and stay in shape (pedal assist modes) or just have more fun by using your electric power trike over the car and then, best of all, it will pay for itself over time.
There are many places in the U.S. where you can legally and responsibly ride e-MTB's, and take it from us; they are a heck of a lot of fun. Check with local land management agencies to find out where you are allowed to use an electric mountain bike before taking to the trails. One thing we do know, e-MTB's can be used on any trails that are legal for motorized use, so we took advantage of the wealth of OHV trails in the greater Lake Tahoe area for our testing purposes and had more fun doing it than any of us expected.
A durable Alpha Platinum Aluminum frame that fully encases a long-range 500Wh battery for great aesthetics and ride quality on the trail, a Bosch Performance CX motor and an ergonomic Purion controller. Plus, 130mm front and rear travel with a RockShox Revelation RL fork, grippy 27.5+ mid-fat tires, Tubeless Ready Bontrager Line Comp wheels with a 54-tooth Rapid Drive hub, a dropper post, and an 11-speed Shimano SLX/XT drivetrain.

Ancheer has become an icon in electric bikes and this mountain bike has earned itself a spot as the best electric mountain bike to ever grace the market. The electric bike comes equipped with a 250 Wat motor and a 36-Volt removable battery that pushes this bike to the extreme. It has an amazing pedal assist functionality which makes it an excellent bike for outdoor and leisure riding.
With mountain bikes already sporting hefty price tags, the cost of adding an electric pedal-assist motor might be enough to send the value-conscious rider's head spinning. In many cases, you get what you pay for and the most expensive models are the highest performing. This isn't always the case, however, and bikes like our Best Buy Award winner, the Giant Trance E+ 2 Pro cost less and perform nearly as well as the more expensive competition. Who makes the best electric mountain bike?
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