eBikes are purpose-built bicycles with 21st Century, high quality components. They are sometimes also referred to as Pedelec or electric assist bicycles. eBikes have Lithium-ion battery powered electric motors that give you additional power and speed as you pedal. If you can ride a regular bicycle, you will have no trouble at all riding an eBike. You can control how much or how little battery power is used. This makes long rides, hills and headwinds an absolute joy to navigate. The latest generation of electric bicycyles have hi-tech batteries that have ranges of 30 to 100 miles. As for cost, you can travel about 25 miles on about 10 cents worth of energy. eBikes have been popular in Europe for years and are now becoming more common around NorthTexas, because they make biking accessible by more people and are really fun to ride.
Due to the high number of sales of our bikes to fellow sportsman just like yourself, our bikes are in high demand. Check out our All Terrain Electric Fat Bike listing page to see what’s in stock and what’s on the way. Hopefully we’ll be able to get you out and about and enjoying one of our electric fat bikes and you’ll be able to see for yourself why many of our customers consider this to be the best electric bike for hunting.
In our head to head range test, the Rocky Mountain took the win by traveling 20 miles and 4,297 vertical feet. It is worth mentioning that our tester felt that he worked a little harder while range testing the Rocky Mountain than the other bikes we tested. The Giant wasn't far behind at 19.02 miles and 4,000 vertical feet, and the YT Decoy almost tied that with 19.01 miles and 4,039 vertical feet. The Specialized was nipping at their heels with 18.71 miles and 3,949 feet. The Ghost Hybride SL AMR was the least impressive with a range of just 16.75 miles and 3,559 vertical feet. The outlier in this comparison is the Bulls E-Stream with a 650Wh battery. We were not able to test the Bulls directly against these other competitors, but we did notice that you can ride it significantly farther than any of these other contenders. During one of our test rides, we rode the Bulls 24 miles and 4,500 vertical feet, and the battery still wasn't depleted. More battery storage equals longer rides; it's just that simple.
Our team of experienced testers rode them for weeks on our local trails—everything from flow trails, to technical singletrack, to our enduro courses. We self-shuttled DH runs and hit the bike path. To understand the differences between them, we rode them back to back on similar trails. We tested them against standard bikes on the same trails in the same conditions. And to evaluate their range, we charged them all and ran them on full power until their batteries flickered and died.
Every bike on this list has been thoroughly evaluated and vetted by our team of test editors. We research the market, survey user reviews, speak with product managers and engineers, and use our own experience riding these bikes to determine the best options. Our team of experienced testers spent many hours and miles using these bikes for their intended purpose. We’ve commuted to and from work on them, used them to stock up on groceries and beer, tested their passenger-hauling capability, ridden them on questionable terrain to see how they handle, and run their batteries down to officially see how long they last on one charge. We evaluated them on performance, price, comfort, handling, value, reliability, fun, and overall e-factor to come up with this list of bikes that will best serve the needs of anyone looking to add a little pedal assist to their ride.

Cannondale has electrified a significant chunk of its bicycle lineup, and now it's determined to conquer the mountain biking world in earnest. The company has unveiled a redesigned Moterra e-bike for the harsher climbs and a brand new Habit NEO (below) that's designed for "fast and flowy" rides -- say, a trip through a winding forest instead of an arduous hill climb. Both bikes aim to make electric riding easier than before, including through raw power.
Merax Aluminum electric mountain bike is an excellent option if you are looking for a lightweight frame bike and a good suspension for smooth riding. This mountain ebike has standard Shimano 7 speed gears. Merax Aluminum electric mountain bike can develop the speed of maximum 32 km/h. The electric bike has a 350W high-speed motor and removable 36V 8.8Ah Lithium Battery. The battery allows you to ride a bike for up to 28 miles with a single charge of it. This electric mountain bike is also an excellent choice for those who are looking for an ergonomic design.

The Rad Power Bikes RadWagon is a remarkable value proposition: It sports a powerful 750-watt direct-drive hub motor, a 7-speed Shimano Altus drivetrain, a throttle, fenders, and integrated lights. After a couple months of testing, we can report that it hauls just as well as competitors that cost thousands more. Cost-saving measures include mechanical disc brakes and a cadence sensor (rather than a torque sensor). We got about 35 miles of range from the battery and discovered that changing the wheel size to 28 inches on the display unit increases the top (e-assisted) speed to 24 mph.
This powerful eBike was designed with the hunter in mind and comes in several different colors including matte black, gloss red and Special Edition Kuiu Verde 2.0 for those looking to blend in with nature.  Stopping quickly on the trail won't be an issue with the Mule because it comes standard with a pair of 203MM hydraulic disc brakes.  A set of aggressive skid-proof pedals help hunters power past even the toughest off-road challenges. 
Most brands list their bike's power, but avoid putting too much emphasis on the number— there is no standard for measuring this, so the performance can vary wildly. Every motor on our list is rated to a continuous, or nominal, power output of 250 watts. But even this number isn't always accurate. Instead, look for torque, which measures how much rotational force is being applied to move the motor. It's the oomph, grunt, or kick you feel when you step on the pedals. More torque means faster acceleration and increased assistance.
The 150mm (fork) and 140mm (shock) suspension allows you to hit double-track ruts without veering from your line and are tuned for the added weight of the motor and battery. That makes the bike easier to handle than a bike this heavy might otherwise. The motor is powerful and torquey meaning you can stay in the lower two assist levels of the five available to save battery and still get enough kick to ascend just slightly faster than on a regular bike. The highest setting really has some oomph, with a little too much power to use on tight or technical trails. It’s better for fire road climbs or cruising on pavement to the trail head or back home after a ride.

With mountain bikes already sporting hefty price tags, the cost of adding an electric pedal-assist motor might be enough to send the value-conscious rider's head spinning. In many cases, you get what you pay for and the most expensive models are the highest performing. This isn't always the case, however, and bikes like our Best Buy Award winner, the Giant Trance E+ 2 Pro cost less and perform nearly as well as the more expensive competition. Who makes the best electric mountain bike?
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