Electric mountain bikes are here, growing in popularity, and despite some access concerns—and perhaps because of them—continue to get better, more enjoyable to ride. Their small motors help you ride faster, farther, and can making challenging climbs less daunting. We tested 10 of the most exciting new models to help you find the right one for you. Read quick reviews of top five options below, or scroll deeper for helpful buying advice and longer reviews of every option.

Giant is a household name when it comes to traditional mountain biking applications, and with a name that’s as respected as theirs, you’re right to think that the company’s Trance E+ 2 Pro is one of the most well-rounded e-bike offerings on the market. To ensure that riders preserve their stamina throughout each and every ride, the E+ features an assisted SyncDrive Pro motor, Maestro suspension, and 27.5-inch wheels for exceptional trail traversal. A tunable power output allows for bespoke customization, while the bike’s high-end Shimano XT and SLX groupset keeps things in perfect operating order. On the front and rear of the E+, you’ll find a capable Fox suspension, along with an e-bike optimized fork that’s been built for use alongside this platform. To keep things relatively lightweight, Giant has opted to create the bike’s frame from durable ALUXX SL aluminum, complementing the company’s dependable 36-volt lithium-ion battery.
When you need a great electric mountain bike that will assure you of a longer runtime, you need to get this. The Cyclamatic Power Plus Electric bike comes with a powerful 36V lithium-ion battery. This works for up to 28 miles range; hence very convenient. Besides this, the e-bike also has a stylish design, which makes it ideal for riders. It can be used by 14 years and above. The bike also has large wheels, which makes it move with a lot of ease. It can maneuver easily on all terrains to assure you of an excellent and smooth ride.
Electric bikes are here in a big way. Liberated from some of the normal constraints of standard bike design like weight and gearing, e-bike design has exploded; if you can imagine it, someone has built it. From cargo bikes to city bikes, messenger bikes to mountain bikes, road bikes, folding bikes, and even beach cruisers, there is something for everyone. The beauty of e-bikes is that they make the joy of cycling accessible to so many people in so many ways. See at-a-glance reviews below of five of our top-rated e-bikes, or scroll deeper for full reviews of these and other high-ranking options, plus more buying info.
On a trip to Palo Alto we had the chance to ride Specialized’s pedal-assisted Turbo Vado, and the model is still our favorite ebike on the market. With a 350-watt motor and 604-watt-hour lithium-ion battery, the Turbo Vado is capable of traveling a whopping 80 miles on a single charge, which should be more than enough for any daily commute with plenty of miles left over.
Great for fitness and fun Don’t think that eBikes won’t allow for exercise. You still get all the exercise you decide you want.  The more you pedal, they farther yu can go. Plus, it feels great to pedal when it’s so easy to, so most electric bicycle riders actually pedal a lot. Some people even ride eco-friendly bikes as much for fun and staying fit as they do for normal transportation. It’s great knowing that you can head out for a long ride without being concerned that you might tire out and not be able to pedal home. Never a problem! Just let the motor assist lend a helping hand!
One of the primary purposes of an e-bike is transferring power from the motor to the drivetrain to "support" your regular pedal stroke. All of the different drive units do this in relatively the same way, although subtle differences in their power output make them all feel slightly different. It is important to note that all of these systems work pretty well; the differences between them are relatively subtle but noticeable. We tested this metric primarily based on feel, as opposed to any sort of scientific measurement, and our testers could all notice the differences between the various models. All of the e-bikes we tested have several support modes offering varying levels of pedal assist support.
After you decide which style of e-bike you want, consider the class. In the U.S., there are three classes defined by the type of assist and how fast the motor will propel you. Most electric bikes sold are class 1 or 3. Class 1 bikes have a motor (max 750w) that assists while you’re pedaling, up to 20 mph. Class 3, also known as “speed pedelec,” can also have up to a 750w motor, but it can assist you up to 28 mph. Both are allowed in most states and cities without requiring a license. Class 2 models have throttles that don’t require the rider to pedal in order to get a boost. They’re allowed on most streets, bike lanes, and paths, but are less popular than the other classes and not covered much here (because not only do we still love to pedal, we also prefer the greater distances that pedal-assist bikes can cover). What are the best electric mountain bikes?

Built around a heavy-duty alloy frame, the GSD eschews many of the traits of other cargo bikes: long wheelbases, bigger wheels, and especially, an unwieldy ride. Yet it boasts an extensive capacity, nimble handling—even fully loaded, thanks to a short wheelbase and 20-inch wheels—and enduring range in a package not much bigger than most non-cargo e-bikes. The stout frame holds a 250-watt Bosch motor that gives up to 275 percent of your power back to the pedals and reaches 20 mph. The GSD has room for two battery packs, extending the batteries’ combined range to a claimed 150 miles and making the Tern one of the longest-lasting e-bikes on the market. A laundry list of accessories and a (claimed) 396-pound carrying capacity round out the GSD’s status as an epic day-tripper. 

Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.
In the end, the Specialized Turbo Levo Comp proved to be the tester favorite, offering the most versatile downhill performance that felt the "most like a mountain bike" that the other models couldn't match. The Specialized proved to be the most nimble and agile by far, yet still managed to be confident and stable at speed. We were also thoroughly impressed by the versatility and confidence-inspiring manners of our Best Buy winner, the Giant Trance E+ 2 Pro. The Trance's modern geometry and quality component spec are the primary factors that help it outperform some of the competition. The Bulls E-Stream has a more one dimensional downhill performance, a stable and planted feel that absolutely charges downhill and excels as the speeds increase. The enduro-oriented YT Decoy CF Pro is also very impressive on the descents. The modern geometry, low bottom bracket, generous travel, and quality component spec all combine to make this a hard-charging beast on the descents. The Decoy can't match the versatility or well-rounded nature of the Levo, but it crushes downhill with authority.

As someone who owns both a Quest and Rift S I think this article misses the mark in a few areas: While the Quest technically has a higher resolution, it is a pentile display and as such is is more prone to godrays, glare and SDE. The overall resolution of the Rift S is lower but it has an RGB stripe display with more subpixels so side by side it actually looks sharper. Quest has 4 tracking cameras, Rift S has 5 so the overall area it can scan is greater and this makes a difference, especially in games where you lift your arms up and above your head. In order to move the data over the USB C wire the image will be compressed at the sides so it won't be as sharp or well defined as what you will see in the Rift S. In my experience, the Rift S refresh rate of 80hz is really the bottom end for comfortable VR experiences. When playing games that support cross buy or watching videos, I still experience discomfort on the Quest (especially during fast movement) whereas the same content feels perfect comfortable on my Rift S and even PSVR. This is more of a personal preference thing but I find the Rift S halo design far, far more comfortable to extended sessions that the Quest scuba mask design. So while it's impressive that the Quest will soon become a hybrid VR headset, let's not get carried away and just ignore its shortcomings and limitations. For the best PCVR experience a dedicated PCVR headset is still the way to go.


It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
Firstly this is not a motorcycle. I bought this to use as a daily commuter.I now have 1000 + miles on it. The pedal assist works fine and may be ok for leisurely riding but I just use the throttle and pedal. This is a great bike. Strong frame and wheels. Been in two crashes and no damage. The tires are nice off road tires and now live on my daughters mountain bike. I switched them out for high pressure road tires. Forget about the horn and light. They don't work. I am 6'1" 32" inseam and had to buy a longer seatpost($30) to fit this frame. 13miles each way commute. Battery life is fine. After the 26 mile round trip it has a little juice left but not enough for another ride to work. I would buy again.
Yes, there are less expensive ebikes on the market but most come with a few serious caveats. The Espin Sport delivers on the full promise of an electric bike, but in a more affordable fashion. This bike isn’t going to tow you around for a 60-mile round-trip endeavor but those seeking their first ebike will get plenty of return on their investment with this model.
The Ultra Mid Drive Bafang motor is the best motor there is and due to it’s high cost most other brands have not adopted it yet. The ‘Ultra’ has torque sensors built in so it knows how much power to give you based on how much pressure you are applying to the pedals, so it intelligently gives you the right amount of power when you need it most and not a predetermined power regardless of what terrain you’re tackling, so you have more control.

The kind of motor that is found in the electric bike is one consideration to look out for when buying the bike. Here is a very powerful and convenient E-bike that delivers great speed. This is because the bike is powered by the 350W high-speed motor. Apart from this, it has 10Ah lithium-ion battery, which provides a longer runtime; hence the best pick for you.
Bottom Line The Specialized Turbo Levo Comp returns to our e-bike test with a well rounded performance that earns it our Editor's Choice Award, again. The Bulls E-Stream Evo AM 4 is a brawler on the descents with an impressive distance range thanks to its large battery storage capacity. The YT Decoy is an aggressive e-bike with an enduro attitude. The Giant Trance E+ 2 Pro is well rounded and reasonably priced earning it our Best Buy Award. The Instinct Powerplay Alloy 50 is close to greatness but is held back by its controls and components.
The above electric mountain bikes are the best selections on the market today. They are safe and durable bikes that will guarantee safe rides. They are also built from strong and sturdy metallic frames to offer long-term service. In addition to this, the electric bikes are ideal for riding on different terrains. This is due to large wheels, which provide smooth rides. They are also user-friendly electric bikes that are
The Remote CTRL is a playful ride that’s great for varied trails with rock gardens and flow sections, and that excels on fast trails with steep, punchy climbs and tight, twisty descents. It isn’t just for riders who may need a little assistance; the E-MTB mode creates an organic riding experience that allows you to take the skills you already have and ride faster and harder. It has a 150mm RockShox Yari fork and a 132mm RockShox Monarch Plus R shock with good mid-stroke support and a progressive finish to help prevent bottoming out on big hits. The 27.5x2.8-inch Maxxis Recon tires offer plenty of traction and also help to absorb smaller hits. The Remote CTRL's excellent Bosch motor accelerates smoothly to be more manageable when pedaling through rocky sections and has more oomph at low cadence than other motors, so you can more easily ride out of tough situations if you get bogged down.
The Surly Big Easy is the Cadillac of the bike lane. The company’s new longtail e-cargo bike exudes a “they don’t make ’em like this anymore” stature, thanks to a beefed-up chromoly steel frame rolling on tough 26x2.5-inch tires. And because it’s a class 1 e-bike, you can actually ride it in the bike lane, too. The 7-foot-long, 67-pound bike won’t play well with your third-floor walk-up, so it’s best to think of it as a car supplement or replacement—that’s what Surly intended, anyway, as evidenced by the $5,000 price tag. However, if you’re ready to commit to the cargo bike life, you’ll struggle to find a stronger platform for achieving bike commuter nirvana.
Scott’s Genius eRIDE 920 is another bike with Shimano’s excellent Steps E8000 motor. The narrow width of this motor—same as a standard Shimano mountain bike crank—is a nice feature, as is the support and customization offered by Shimano’s e-Tube apps. Boost mode lets you cruise comfortably at up to 20 miles per hour on pavement, while Trail mode doles out torque more smoothly and increases range. But compared to the Bosch in e-mtb mode (comparable to Shimano's Trail mode), Shimano’s faster and harder-hitting torque is less desirable for navigating technical terrain. The 29-inch wheels and 150mm of travel provide the ability to straight-line some really gnarly stuff. This bike is meant for riding big and riding hard. The big travel, long trail, and slack head angle give you a bike that loves to go straight and gobble up rowdy trails. And despite being such a long bike, it still handles technical terrain well.
We have customer service centers in both Nevada and North Carolina to assist with any questions or problems you may have. What's more, our dual East/West coast distribution centers mean we can get products to you quicker, and save on the shipping too, passing on the savings for even lower prices. Most products will reach most of the US within just 3 working days!
This combination will give you a maximum unassisted speed of up to 19 MPH. Carrying a lot of gear will not be an issue with this eBike because it has a 300 pound weight capacity. This model also comes with an easy to read digital display that will give you better control of your eBike. Available in two different colors, black or camo will give hunters more options to choose from. 

It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.


Achesin electric mountain bike is designed with an ergonomic design that makes it very stable and easy to ride. Like most of the mountain bikes, this one is built with a good double-layered aluminum alloy wheel which makes it easy to maneuver, lightweight and durable. With its powerful motor and battery system, you can easily cover between 25 to 50 kilometers depending on the nature of the terrain.
This utilitarian Class 3 (28 mph) road e-bike is smooth and torquey thanks to its Bosch Performance Speed motor. With a drop bar and traditional road-bike position and handling, the CrossRip+ is more suited to long rides on mixed terrain than navigating congested city streets. It comes with a rear rack—for mounting bags, not for attaching cargo directly—full fenders, a kickstand, and integrated front and rear lights (which are powered by the Bosch 500Wh battery). It features a SRAM Force 1x11 drivetrain, hydraulic disc brakes, and wide 700x38mm tires.
The Domane+ e-road bike is the electric version of Trek’s popular Domane. It’s designed for riders who appreciate that bike’s reliable comfort and IsoSpeed technology but want the added fun and function of e-assist. It’s also the ideal companion for anyone coming back from injury, slower riders who want to mix it up with a speedy group, and couples with different fitness levels. A Bosch Performance Line Speed motor provides a very welcome 28 mph of pedal assist, and the 500Wh Powertube battery sleekly integrates into the down tube. Also integrated: front and rear lights, which are powered by the battery—no charging required.
Prodeco V5 Phantom X2 8 Speed Folding Electric Bicycle is constructed and tested in the USA. Travelling on a bike is sometimes very comfortable to get some fresh air. This bike is the one that is designed by keeping your needs in mind. It allows you to fold the bike in a compact form and can carry it in the office, basements, flats, etc. The Prodeco V5 Phantom X2 bicycle has avid BB7 disc brakes, 500-watt motor, 12Ah battery, and rigid frame. The manufacturers offer a lifetime warranty on the frame and 2 years on components.
On the road, it takes only a few turns of the pedals to activate the Vado’s motor and get it up to speed. In Turbo mode — the bike’s highest level of pedal-assist — the Vado reaches speeds of up to 28 miles per hour, after which the electric drive system automatically shuts off to conserve power (and abide by local law). A built-in LED readout on the handlebars allows riders to monitor battery life, check current speed, and track calories burned while also being able to glance at distance traveled. The Turbo Vado Mission Control app (iOS/Android) also connects to the bike via Bluetooth and allows riders to further tune their ride and adjust the bike’s settings.

Most brands list their bike's power, but avoid putting too much emphasis on the number— there is no standard for measuring this, so the performance can vary wildly. Every motor on our list is rated to a continuous, or nominal, power output of 250 watts. But even this number isn't always accurate. Instead, look for torque, which measures how much rotational force is being applied to move the motor. It's the oomph, grunt, or kick you feel when you step on the pedals. More torque means faster acceleration and increased assistance.
The Ranger’s also got lots of features that make it a safe, comfortable ride when you’re on the hunt. Its huge 4.5in wide wheels paired with a 7-speed Shimano hub will help you go uphill and back on any terrain easily. The hydraulic suspension on this ride will have you riding like a champ, and in those times you need to stop on a dime, the disc brakes will kick in without hesitation and won’t slip even in the wettest conditions. Hands down, the Quiet Kat 750w Ranger is the best choice for any hunter.
Let’s face it, at this price you likely won’t get a bike that hides its battery with any sort of elegance. Except for the Blix Vika+ folding e-bike on this list that tucks its battery behind the seat tube and the Propella that passes its battery off as a water bottle, most are stuck to the top of the down tube. Don’t expect to ride across the state on these, either. The highest range in this list is 50 miles, but most average about 30 to 35. Check the bike’s battery range before you buy to make sure it fits your daily needs.
The motor is powerful enough to allow you to hit up to 35kmh on a 10.4ah battery that stays alive for 50km. With the fat Kenda tires and suspension fork, the bike does not need any pedal assistance to smoothly roll on even surfaces. The PAS provides five levels of assistance and even the first level is quite powerful. The fifth level will just blow you away with speed and torque and there is no way that you can pedal fast enough to meet any resistance.
One thing that separates these two are their warranties.  Rambo offer a 1 year limited warranty.  While Quietkat offer a 1 year limited warranty on all it's components including the battery, but each frame is covered by a lifetime warranty.  Quietkat have been around longer and are a proven, reliable manufacturer.  They've got it figured out and this year's catalog shows just how good they are.  Rambo is a new, small company with big ambitions and a quality product that they can stand behind.
A few days after receiving the bike I received an email from Homdox asking if everything arrived ok and how the bike was working out. I let them know about the broken handle on the gear shift and sent them pictures. They replied on the first business day that followed stating they'd send a replacement. So... impressions right now are good. Hopefully the part arrives quickly and is in fact the right part.
The Domane+ e-road bike is the electric version of Trek’s popular Domane. It’s designed for riders who appreciate that bike’s reliable comfort and IsoSpeed technology but want the added fun and function of e-assist. It’s also the ideal companion for anyone coming back from injury, slower riders who want to mix it up with a speedy group, and couples with different fitness levels. A Bosch Performance Line Speed motor provides a very welcome 28 mph of pedal assist, and the 500Wh Powertube battery sleekly integrates into the down tube. Also integrated: front and rear lights, which are powered by the battery—no charging required.
Every bike on this list has been thoroughly evaluated and vetted by our team of test editors. We research the market, survey user reviews, speak with product managers and engineers, and use our own experience riding these bikes to determine the best options. Our team of experienced testers spent many hours and miles using these bikes for their intended purpose. We’ve commuted to and from work on them, used them to stock up on groceries and beer, tested their passenger-hauling capability, ridden them on questionable terrain to see how they handle, and run their batteries down to officially see how long they last on one charge. We evaluated them on performance, price, comfort, handling, value, reliability, fun, and overall e-factor to come up with this list of bikes that will best serve the needs of anyone looking to add a little pedal assist to their ride.
Living life on the edge is certainly respectable, but there comes a time in every rider’s life where they want to enjoy their favorite trail without all of the work that’s typically associated with a trip up the mountain. Luckily, the electronically-assisted mountain bike has become insanely popular in recent years, thanks to an entire subset of riders who want to spend less time pedaling and more time enjoying their hard-earned therapy hours. Below, we’ll outline a handful of this year’s most capable cycles, and give you some elaborate insight as to why they’re the best of the best when it comes to hybrid traversal.

On the road, it takes only a few turns of the pedals to activate the Vado’s motor and get it up to speed. In Turbo mode — the bike’s highest level of pedal-assist — the Vado reaches speeds of up to 28 miles per hour, after which the electric drive system automatically shuts off to conserve power (and abide by local law). A built-in LED readout on the handlebars allows riders to monitor battery life, check current speed, and track calories burned while also being able to glance at distance traveled. The Turbo Vado Mission Control app (iOS/Android) also connects to the bike via Bluetooth and allows riders to further tune their ride and adjust the bike’s settings.
Advice E-Bikes Buying Guide E-Bike FAQs Commuting with an e-bike E-Bikes make commuting easier How e-bikes work Are Electric Bikes Cheating? E bikes: 14 myths busted for 2017 Why e-bikes are simply brilliant bikes E-bikes and Body Geometry E-bikes vs. Regular Bikes How e-MTBs are tearing up trail centres E-bikes help cyclists go the distance See all E-Bike advice...
Visit Adventure Electric Bicycles of Arlington and join the new revolution of electric bicycles. We combine twice fun, at 10% of the effort and a fraction of the cost of other forms of transportation. Whether you’re a daily bike commuter or just ride for fun & fitness you’ll love the feeling of riding your electric bike. If you talk to many eBike riders they will tell you that today’s eBikes are “Fun. Fast & Convenient”. Adventure Electric Bicycles has many models that offer great range, charge quickly and are extremely reliable. eBikes are absolutely the most cost-efficient form of personal power-assisted transportation available. 

I bought this bike with intended use on my hunting farms. I’ve ridden it now off road several times, and to say I’m blown away, is an understatement. This bike simply blew me away on all fronts. The motor is super strong and pulls me around great. I’m 6’2 210 so I’m not a small guy either. Like others have said, if this thing doesn’t make you smile the first time you ride it, you’re just not a happy person!!!! 

I’ve been wanting to get an electric hunting bike for a while but I’m curious about charging the batteries while out hunting. How long would I need to run a generator for to top off a battery? Would a solar panel even get the job done? Seems like extra batteries might make the most sense. How long would one of these batteries take to charge from empty?
The bike is powered by a Bafang 750-watt hub drive motor that is rather impressive for its size.  A large digital display will give you all the vital readouts that you need while blazing down the trail.  A 300-pound carrying capacity will let you bring home big game without slowing you down.  This eBike comes in two different colors that includes charcoal or camo.  This model has a rigid front fork.

This electric tricycle features an all electric mode which allows you to ride the trike without the need to pedal, this trike will zip along and get you home in no time, or if you want to pedal it like a traditional tricycle you can switch off the power or select between the 5 progressive power assist modes which add electric power to your pedal power.


Update: I've had the bike about 4 months now and ride it almost everyday, it is my primary form of transportation, and I have been pleased with it's overall performance, the battery is holding up pretty well and I've never not made it home without juice to spare, the only issue I've had is with flat tires so I wanted to highly recommend putting green slime in the tires, you do not want to have to deal with getting the back tire off for a flat, but other than that the bike is running great, as others have said it is a little less powerful than you may expect but I am very satisfied with the build quality and quality of components. For saddle bags I got the type of bracket that wraps around the seat post and saddle bags meant for that kind of bracket and they have worked well for me, so I can carry my shopping and groceries easily on the bike now . http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0030RS5CA?redirect=true&ref_=cm_cr_ryp_prd_ttl_sol_18 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00K6CEPGM?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s01


Received the Ancheer 250watt bike and my friend (bike fan and repair guy) has been riding it on flats and moderate hills here in So Cal. He made some initial adjustments, but so far … so good, 2 months in. I have no idea how long the battery will last (lifetime recharge 500 times ?) but hoping it will keep going. I have read many reviews on this ebike … and there is nothing consistent here. Everyone belongs to the good, bad, or ugly … category. I am looking for buyer reviews that have had the bike for more than 6 months. And there is really not much anyone can do except to ride it and see what happens. I have learned a lot on the way … for sure. My buddy now has a 350 watt Mtn ebike he is also testing out. Initially he was very happy with 250 watt, and did not want to buy a 350. But he is enjoying the wee bit more power … esp up hills. Thanks for your write up … as I can appreciate y,all input !!!

You'll have to wait until the fall to pick up one of Cannondale's new offerings, and it's clear that high-performance mountain e-bikes don't come cheap. The Habit NEO ranges from $5,500 to $7,000, and you're looking at between $6,000 to $9,000 for the Moterra line (the Moterra SE costs $8,500). These are for riders determined to overcome most any terrain and don't mind paying a premium.
I’ve been wanting to get an electric hunting bike for a while but I’m curious about charging the batteries while out hunting. How long would I need to run a generator for to top off a battery? Would a solar panel even get the job done? Seems like extra batteries might make the most sense. How long would one of these batteries take to charge from empty?

Electric bikes are here in a big way. Liberated from some of the normal constraints of standard bike design like weight and gearing, e-bike design has exploded; if you can imagine it, someone has built it. From cargo bikes to city bikes, messenger bikes to mountain bikes, road bikes, folding bikes, and even beach cruisers, there is something for everyone. The beauty of e-bikes is that they make the joy of cycling accessible to so many people in so many ways. See at-a-glance reviews below of five of our top-rated e-bikes, or scroll deeper for full reviews of these and other high-ranking options, plus more buying info.
To help the rider find the perfect fit, the stem is adjustable. The bike also boasts dynamo powered lights alongside hydraulic disc brakes. The bike will suit riders from 4 ft 10 to 6 ft 5, and also integrates with a child seat. The total weight is 22.5kg, making it admittedly a fairly hefty folder – but that’s fairly uniform across electric versions.

The Altitude Powerplay is one of three bikes on this list (Specialized Turbo Levo and Liv Intrigue E+ are the others) to use a custom motor. The Dyname 3.0 motor offers 100Nm of torque and is also compact enough that Rocky can use the same geometry and suspension-pivot placement as an unplugged Altitude, so the Powerplay feels more like an unplugged bike than most e-bikes. With the motor off it rides like a standard, albeit heavy, trail bike. The motor responds more quickly than some of the more popular systems and the increased torque offers increased acceleration, which, depending on the trail situation, can be welcome or a hindrance.


I’ve been wanting to get an electric hunting bike for a while but I’m curious about charging the batteries while out hunting. How long would I need to run a generator for to top off a battery? Would a solar panel even get the job done? Seems like extra batteries might make the most sense. How long would one of these batteries take to charge from empty?

All Cannondale E-bikes have one thing in common — pure, visceral cycling performance. Our goal is to create bikes that are so rider-focused, so seamlessly integrated and so much damn fun to ride, that you forget you've got power assist, forget you're on an electric bike, forget everything except how good it feels to be on that bike, in that moment. If that sounds like your cup of tea, power up. Let's Ride.
It is a great e-bike which has a PAS feature. This means, that the bike is secure enough for riding for beginners and the motor is adjustable to your needs. It is a lightweight and simple e-bike.  The price is really astonishing for normal size electric bicycle. Another thing to mention Jasscol has disc brakes which are not so common on cheap bicycles. Read the full review here.
Prodeco V5 Phantom X Lite 9 Speed Folding Electric Bicycle is a lightweight and well-balanced bike that is suitable for all adventurers, campers, and sports enthusiasts. It gives an outstanding and smooth performance with a 300-watt motor. It is an eye-catching bike that looks fabulous in black color. Plus, you can carry it with you by simply folding it.

Nakto electric bike comes with two styles of frame, both for man and a step-though frame for women. Equipped with Shimano 6 speed derailleur, the 6-speed gear system allows you to reach up to a 25mph top speed. Nakto City E-Bike is affordable, but it’s got a lot of features that are found on more expensive models. You can switch between pedal assist and twist-and-go settings and engage the motor with just a flip of a switch when you need an extra push.
Nakto City Electric Bike is designed for urban commuting, it is fast, comfortable and convenient. This is a perfect utility bike; you can use it to run errands, go to the grocery store, go to work, or just a leisure ride. It is equipped with all the features you would want for riding around town, such as LED headlight, a rear cargo rack, a cargo basket and a kickstand.
Moreover, the E-bike has an LCD display panel for easy and quick control of the bike. With the LED headlight, you will find it excellent for cycling even at night hours. It also features the 160 disc brakes system that provides the best all-weather stopping power. It is a great bike that features the 21- speed gear to boost the hill climbing power. The electric bike also has two working modes that include the pedal assistant mode and E-bike mode.
The Moterra Neo is one of the shorter travel e-bikes we’ve tested. It has a 140mm Rockshox Pike fork and 130mm of rear travel. That was enough travel to handle everything we encountered on the trail and the shorter travel was welcome on less technical terrain. It uses a Bosch Performance Line CX motor with 500 Wh battery integrated into the downtube. In testing, we’ve found Bosch's E-MTB mode works very well, offering a quick and hearty kick when you need to accelerate quickly, but gentle assistance in tricky sections. The lower travel stopped the bike from bogging down in technical uphill rock gardens, making them easier to ride through, and the 160mm cranks also help to reduce pedal strikes so you can keep the power on. The agile handling and stable ride make it one of the easier e-bikes to adapt to, and one of the most versatile.
Today’s electric bikes come in a variety of sizes and styles,  many of which don’t look all that much different from traditional non-electric bikes. When you consider it alongside the annual costs of fueling, insuring, and maintaining an automobile, an ebike literally pays for itself over time. Here are five of the best electric bikes currently on the market — and one “just for fun” pick.
The Class 3 Aventon Pace 500 urban e-bike has five levels of pedal assist and tops out at 28 mph. But the Pace has something not found on a lot of modern e-bikes. In addition to pedal power, it also has a throttle—in the case of the Pace, a small thumb paddle on the left side of the handlebar next to the control unit that holds a steady 20 mph, no pedaling required. The bike itself has an aluminum frame, a swept-back handlebar, ergo grips, a sturdy kickstand, hydraulic disc brakes, 8-speed Shimano Altus shifting and gearing, 27.5x2.2-inch Kenda e-bike-rated tires, a saddle the size of Texas, and good ol’ classic city/commuter-bike geometry. It doesn’t come equipped with fenders or a rear rack, but you can add them. Power comes in the form of a 500-watt rear-hub motor and a semi-integrated battery on the down tube (with a range of up to 50 miles); a backlit display unit mounted on the stem shows your speed and distance and tells you how much juice you have left.
The Bulls motor is claimed to have 90Nm of torque, but it was so smooth and quiet that it didn't feel outrageously powerful. The assistance came on smooth and strong thanks to the belt-driven system. The Rocky Mountain Instinct Powerplay Alloy 50 uses a drive system that claims to have up to 108Nm of torque. While their system felt quite powerful, it didn't feel stronger than the Bulls, and we noticed that it seemed to modulate its output in a way that the others didn't. The Rocky Mountain makes you work for it a little more than the rest. The Trek, Giant, and the Specialized motor systems felt slightly less powerful, still offering plenty of pedal-assist support mind you, but that also resulted in efficient motors and longer distance ranges than the models with more brute power. Despite having the same Shimano Steps E8000 pedal-assist motor, the Ghost felt less powerful than the YT Decoy. The YT felt as if it delivered more power more consistently and smoothly than the Ghost could.
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