The 2019 Specialized Turbo Levo Comp returns to our electric mountain bike test and claims our Editor's Choice Award for the second year in a row. The new model has several notable changes over the previous version we tested including a new frame design, 29-inch wheels, 150mm of front and rear wheel travel, a new motor, and an updated battery charge and power output display. All these new changes have only helped to solidify the Turbo Levo Comp's position at the top of the podium. It still has the same well-rounded performance on the trail that makes it "feel the most like a mountain bike." It is more playful and agile than the competition, yet it still manages to charge the fall-line just as hard. Like previous Turbo Levo models, Specialized has very stealthily integrated the battery and motor into the frame giving it a low center of gravity and a very non-e-bike look. The new Specialized 2.1 motor is very quiet, plus it weighs less and has reduced the overall weight of the bike by more than 2 lbs.
Electric Hybrid Bikes- As the name suggests, these bikes combine the properties of mountain and fat-tire bikes. They are built to be fast and tough at the same time. They are lighter than electric mountain bikes, so you don’t have to deal with the excess weight when going up hills. You can use the bike to carry heavy luggage or cycle through rough trails.
It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
The 13amh battery is nestled at the down tube frame on a battery bracket, which you can remove quickly if required. The battery is powerful enough to provide life juice to the bike for a long distance. The trip distance is 25 miles in full electric mode and 50 miles on the assist pedal. The battery comes with a 48V 2.0A charger and it survives more than 500 times of recharge cycles.
So I think that we can agree that e-bikes are definitely not cheap. Why not just go for an electric scooter then? Well electric bikes do have a lot of advantages. First, most of the people have been familiar with the concept of riding a bicycle since they were kids. So there is basically no learning curve with electric bikes. And you don’t have to worry about looking stupid, or getting pulled over just so the policeman could see what the heck you are riding. Second, you can ride electric bike just like a regular bike, just turn off the electric motor/assistance. Third, unlike many electric scooters that are designed for flat surfaces, quality electric bicycles are often created with tires that can withstand a higher amount of roughness, for example electric dirt bikes.
Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.
The original Power Plus model was one of the most popular in its class, introducing the joy and practicalities of e-bikes to a huge audience around the world.  The CX1 builds on that success, adding a NEW more powerful brushless motor, a NEW upgraded battery, a 21-speed gear system, and improved reliability.  The steel frame, strong brakes, suspension and quick-shift gears offer all the qualities of a premium mountain bike with the added feature of three pedal assist modes.
Perhaps one of the most important factor to consider in a mountain bike is its ability to perform and deliver. The performance that one gets is dependent on the motor the bike comes with. How a motor transfers power to the drivetrain is crucial to the performance and will provide noticeable difference especially when scaling up a mountain or a steep road.
Each of these models comes with a highly capable Bafang Ultra mid-drive motor with torque sensor.  If you are looking for an eBike that can take you deep into nature where the major game are hiding, the Storm is for you!  With a 40 mile range, you will be able to reach areas you never thought possible!  The bike can also carry a ton of gear and has a load capacity of up to 300 pounds. 

With its steep seat tube angle and powerful motor, the Rotwild E+ Ultra masters even the steepest climbs. Its high centre of gravity, however, negatively effects downhill handling. The GIANT FULL E+ 0 is a very solid eMTB where what you see is what you get, although the rather slack seat tube and bulbous-belly isn’t exactly pretty. Not so with the FOCUS SAM²: With its clean silhouette it is a bike for design lovers. But only if you get by with the small integrated battery. As soon as you mount an additional battery, not only the appearance suffers, but also the handling. The BMC Trailfox AMP has minor weaknesses in the componentry, finish and downhill handling – at a price of € 12,000 we expected considerably more. The Thömus Lightrider E1 fares better, it’s no bargain either, but the handling is outstanding. It’s a pity that the bike isn’t available outside of Switzerland. Another exotic specimen is the FANTIC XF1 Integra Enduro 160. The bike from the Italian motorcycle brand can’t deny its roots, tremendously composed and capable on the descents, though it cannot keep up with the competition when going back up – the 180 mm version of the Fantic is significantly better overall.
“I’d like a Bosch bike!” This is what bicycle dealers hear several times a day from new customers – and it’s the biggest mistake you can make when buying an ebike. Sure, the motor is important. However, you don’t buy a car just because of its engine. If you want to be happy with your eMTB in the long term, you have to consider a bike as an overall concept. This group test will help you to find out which bike is best for which type of rider, terrain, and riding style. The motors of the big names in the industry all work extremely well, but differ in their purpose and functionality.
If you are looking for a combination of durability and affordability, then look no further than BackCountry eBikes.  BackCountry eBikes ( aka BAKCOU ) is newer to the electric hunting eBike market but they have done so much for the industry in a short amount of time.  Each bike that they produce is made from the highest quality materials and are more affordable than both Rambo Bikes and QuietKat. 
Its quiet motor is perfect for coming up on a kill without scaring animals away. You can travel up to 19 MPH on this bike, which means you’re not breaking a sweat zipping on and off roads (which is great for animals sensitive to human aromas). Not only that, but it can carry up to 300 lbs, which is great for hauling your hunt in without a car or dirt bike. At only 66lbs, the Rambo R750XP is one of the lightest yet hardest performing e-bikes we’ve seen- definitely consider this bike if you plan on carrying lots around with you on your next trip.
The 150mm (fork) and 140mm (shock) suspension allows you to hit double-track ruts without veering from your line. The motor is powerful and torquey, meaning you can stay in the lower two assist levels (of the five available) to save battery and still get enough kick to ascend just slightly faster than you could on a regular bike. The highest setting has serious oomph, with a little too much power to use on tight or technical trails. It’s better for fire road climbs or cruising on pavement to the trail head or back home after a ride. The Yamaha motor with 80 Nm of peak torque has generous kick to get over small rises or tough spots on the trail. And the boost can hit quickly; Liv says you get full boost (based on your power setting) in just 190 milliseconds and that that quick response time was noticeable, but not welcome in every situation, by our testers. The Liv feels lighter than other e-mountain bikes, so it’s a great option for women looking for a balance between power and maneuverability.
The electric mountain bikes are excellent bikes that deliver great speed and longer rides. This is due to the powerful battery that will assure you of longer runtime. The bikes also use the Shimano speeds, which allow you to easily shift the speeds. In addition to this, the electric mountain bike is also very safe due to the perfect braking system. This makes them safe for all riders. With the LED headlights, you will find them appropriate for night rides.

Weight isn’t anything like a critical as one would assume. Weight distribution however is a different matter and this is where geometry, specifically the ratio of the front centre measurement to the chain stay length really comes into play. Battery placement is important too, and smaller batteries give an edge in the handling stakes while robbing the bike of range.
After you decide which style of e-bike you want, consider the class. In the U.S., there are three classes defined by the type of assist and how fast the motor will propel you. Most electric bikes sold are class 1 or 3. Class 1 bikes have a motor (max 750w) that assists while you’re pedaling, up to 20 mph. Class 3, also known as “speed pedelec,” can also have up to a 750w motor, but it can assist you up to 28 mph. Both are allowed in most states and cities without requiring a license. Class 2 models have throttles that don’t require the rider to pedal in order to get a boost. They’re allowed on most streets, bike lanes, and paths, but are less popular than the other classes and not covered much here (because not only do we still love to pedal, we also prefer the greater distances that pedal-assist bikes can cover). What are the best electric mountain bikes?
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