The 150mm (fork) and 140mm (shock) suspension allows you to hit double-track ruts without veering from your line and are tuned for the added weight of the motor and battery. That makes the bike easier to handle than a bike this heavy might otherwise. The motor is powerful and torquey meaning you can stay in the lower two assist levels of the five available to save battery and still get enough kick to ascend just slightly faster than on a regular bike. The highest setting really has some oomph, with a little too much power to use on tight or technical trails. It’s better for fire road climbs or cruising on pavement to the trail head or back home after a ride.
Now that we have learned all about the amazing eBikes that are perfect for hunting, we will take a look at some handy bike trailers.  As a hunter, you know all too well that you probably can’t fit all your gear on your eBike so having a bike trailer to help bring your gear up the trail is vital.  Additionally, these trailers made by QuietKat and Rambo are great for bringing back big game such as deer. 

This is fantastic and, oddly, mindblowing to me.A decade ago I was working at a local college in IT, and one of the my duties was building/maintaining and monitoring the distance learning rooms, which were equipped with queued cameras tied directly to microphones on each desk, and blah blah blah, those classes connected via hardware codec to other classroom across the state (or in some cases, country) to broadcast a live class to multiple classrooms. Our head end had 30 hardware codecs, a 128in/128out AV router, and required a central bridge to connect multiple endpoints and designate the main source and corresponding layout. Dozens of miles of copper were spread around the campus tied to hundreds of miles of fiber connecting our satellite campuses, all costing literally millions of dollars to create.Now they can do it on Twitch with a basic internet connection and free software. In HD. Holy crap, I am an old man with an onion on my belt, but the progress we have made in a short amount of time is awesome.
The 13amh battery is nestled at the down tube frame on a battery bracket, which you can remove quickly if required. The battery is powerful enough to provide life juice to the bike for a long distance. The trip distance is 25 miles in full electric mode and 50 miles on the assist pedal. The battery comes with a 48V 2.0A charger and it survives more than 500 times of recharge cycles.
The Blix Vika+ is a folding e-bike with a utilitarian execution: At nearly 50 pounds, it’s heavy for its size, and the folding mechanism isn’t as slick as other folding bikes we’ve tested. That said, it does fold into a small package and feels sturdy enough for riding between errands. The geared hub motor is adequately powerful and an included throttle makes it easier to get off the line. A rear rack, front and rear lights, and a kickstand come with the bike—it’s everything you need for zippy urban commuting.

E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque, and others, like Bosch’s Active Line, are nearly silent. But, generally, all four make good options. Look for motor output (in torque), which will give you an idea of total power. Just like car engines, more torque equals more power off the line and more boost to your pedaling. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a more important figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a more accurate reflection of power (higher Wh equals bigger range).
Firstly this is not a motorcycle. I bought this to use as a daily commuter.I now have 1000 + miles on it. The pedal assist works fine and may be ok for leisurely riding but I just use the throttle and pedal. This is a great bike. Strong frame and wheels. Been in two crashes and no damage. The tires are nice off road tires and now live on my daughters mountain bike. I switched them out for high pressure road tires. Forget about the horn and light. They don't work. I am 6'1" 32" inseam and had to buy a longer seatpost($30) to fit this frame. 13miles each way commute. Battery life is fine. After the 26 mile round trip it has a little juice left but not enough for another ride to work. I would buy again.
At 42 pounds for a size medium frame (exceptionally light for an urban e-bike), this step-through model’s silent, mid-drive Bosch Active Line motor provides pedal assist up to 20 mph. And its 400Wh battery lasts a (claimed) 30 miles to a whopping 110 miles, depending on e-assist mode, speed, terrain, rider weight, and cargo. With 26-inch wheels, 2-inch tires, round aluminum tubes, a swept-back handlebar, Shimano Sora 9-speed components, and an 11-32 cassette, the Parkway looks like an everyday, non-motorized city bike at first glance. But with an array of Bosch e-components—motor, battery, and Purion display—it has the zip to take you farther, faster.
The Pivot Shuttle breaks the e-mountain bike mold. It’s Shimano Di2-equipped and features a carbon fiber frame with 140mm of rear travel, a 150mm fork, and a 150mm dropper post. A Shimano STePS e8000 drive unit, paired with a 500Wh battery, provides 20 mph of pedal assist, so you can skip the lift line when you hit the bike park and zip right to the good stuff. The 27.5-inch wheels are nimble and eat up nearly anything in their path, and the massive 2.8-inch tires have huge knobs that grip the trail like Velcro. 

The Super Commuter is aptly named. The 350w Bosch motor sustains speeds up to 28mph, and the burly, 2.4-inch-wide Schwalbe Super Moto-X 650b tires keep you secure on even the roughest city streets. Shimano Deore hydraulic brakes provide ample stopping power. Fenders protect you from road spray so you arrive at your destination fresh. Integrated lights are critical for post-sunset riding, and a side-view mirror hanging on the left side of the handlebar gives a great view of traffic around you. Best of all, you can ride at the speed of urban traffic on the Super Commuter.
There is a one year warranty, but it only covers some of the parts of the bike so you might want to consider still taking out your own insurance. The bike works like a pedal bike, an electric bike and a combination of both it is up to you and how you assemble it. The tires are strong and durable and built for rougher terrain and the charge time takes around four hours.

It used to be you’d have to shell out a pretty penny to grab a piece of the e-bike fun. And while high-priced models still and always will exist—you can own a Specialized S-Works Turbo Levo mountain bike for a mere 12 grand—there are now some very affordable options that weren’t available a year ago. If you’re in it more for the fun than you are for high performance, you likely won’t notice where that extra money is being saved. For example, every bike on this list uses a hub-drive motor versus a mid-drive type, is designed with less integration (think battery and lights), mixes in some lower-quality parts, and has a top speed of 20 mph (save for the Aventon Pace 500 that boosts up to 28 mph). The trade-off: Every bike on this list—save the $1,699, which we included for its relatively high value—is sub-$1,500. Here’s what you’ll typically get with an e-bike in this price range.
The RadCity is a bike that’s been optimized to help you conquer the urban landscape. A big 48V battery gives you an estimated range of between 25 and 45 miles of e-assist from the 750-watt motor, which packs enough acceleration to get you out of dicey situations in traffic. There’s also a wattmeter to help you manage your power consumption on the LCD display. A welded-on rear rack holds up to 60 pounds of cargo, and puncture-resistant Kenda K-Rad tires keep you rolling over precarious debris. Commuting essentials include lights (the tail light also functions as a brake light), fenders, and a rear-mount kickstand.
The bikes we tested all use a different e-bike motor system, and the controls, the primary user interface, are an important element we rated but didn't weight as heavily as some of the others. Each motor system and its associated controls are slightly different. Our primary interest is in how user-friendly is it to interact with the system, how intuitive and ergonomic are the shifters, how good and easy to read is the display, and how easy is it to charge the battery? Each drive system also has a smartphone app that is intended to allow the user to fine-tune the motor's support settings, create custom settings, monitor battery charge and health, and a whole lot more. We don't feel the apps are necessary for the use of any of these e-MTB's, but those with an affinity for technology or personalizing your ride may be inclined to use them.
As you can see, both of these eBike brands are great for hunting.  Each of their models offers something different but they all are made from durable materials. Each bike on this list was designed to travel long distances under rough conditions without making noise.  If you are thinking of getting a new eBike for the purpose of hunting, you really can’t go wrong with either of these brands!  So check them out for yourself to see which might be right for you.    How much do electric mountain bikes cost?
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