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My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs.
Tyres: Chayoyang 26in tyres Handlebars: Aluminum Alloy Lithium battery: 36V Charging time: 4-6 hours Motor: 250W high speed brushless gear motors Saddle tube: Aluminum Alloy seat tube Meter: 3-speed smart meter button Pedal: Aluminum Alloy Pedal Headlight: Bright LED headlamp and horn Front and rear wheels: Double layer Aluminum Alloy wheel (Rainbox DX-3000) Wheel Diameter: 26 inch Seat Height: 30.4-39 inch Handlebars length: 26.7 inch Vehicle weight: 20kg Battery weight: 2.2kg Mileage: 15-30 miles Load capacity: 150kg (over 120kg not recommended) Maximum speed of motor: 15.5mph

Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.
Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position.
Amazing bike, quick. On the flat average 21mph full power, after 3-4 miles average 18mph. A lot of hills in SoCal so this 1/3 hp motor does it’s job well with pedal assist on very steep grades. With electric only mode and heavy, steep, long hills this bike does its job pushing through a 16 mile commute with some energy to spare with a 190lb load of me and my gear. This bike could do much more with flat and pedal assist modes maybe twice as far. Recommend you use smaller tires 1.75 vs the standard 1.95 to achieve my results. Continental contact travels work great!
The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.
With 170mm travel, aggressive angles and Shimano’s superbly calibrated STEPS motor, the Focus Sam2 is an enduro bike with a built-in shuttle. With the bolt on TEC pack you really can climb to new heights, but without it the smaller capacity internal battery means you need to be ultra economical with your energy use. It’s also frustrating that the internal battery can’t be removed easily for charging. By far the biggest frustration with the Jam2 though is that the sizing isn’t very generous and standover clearance is limited. It’s still a great e-bike, but when you’re spending this much money, you can afford to be fussy.

I have the e-bike tuning kit for my Bosch Performance CX motor but i’ve not bothered to fit it yet, before i got the bike i thought that Yeah!, fit the kit and go ride but i’m unsure now – after having the bike for a month i’m quite happy with it as it is, obviously the increased speed will reduce the distance i can travel due to using more battery power and i kinda like the ability to do decent distances/ride all day at the moment.
Chip them, & your asking for a world of potential legal trouble if your evolved in an accident & giving fuel to those ppl frothing at the mouth for (all) MTB’s to be banned from share trails. That said if it’s chipped it shouldn’t be on legal MTB trails, as there classed as basically motorbikes (very simple overview), so suggesting you only use the ‘dongle’ off-road argument falls flat on its face
The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.

Weight isn’t anything like a critical as one would assume. Weight distribution however is a different matter and this is where geometry, specifically the ratio of the front centre measurement to the chain stay length really comes into play. Battery placement is important too, and smaller batteries give an edge in the handling stakes while robbing the bike of range.
A few days after receiving the bike I received an email from Homdox asking if everything arrived ok and how the bike was working out. I let them know about the broken handle on the gear shift and sent them pictures. They replied on the first business day that followed stating they'd send a replacement. So... impressions right now are good. Hopefully the part arrives quickly and is in fact the right part.
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