my thoughts on Hucksauce's question (electric bike or electric motorcycle? How is it defined?). I own a Honda ruckus, its 50cc its max speed cant exceed 45mph and i don't need a motorcycle license. therefore no motorcycle. If the motor on a E-bike can carry you past 45mph i would consider it a motorcycle. made street legal a E-bike that Exceeds 45mph possible would need a motorcycle license.
What i’d really like is the ability to custom tune the standard speed settings with regard to the torque curve/output and perhaps have a top speed of 18mph or thereabouts, back when i could ride a normal bike under my own steam there were some sections of my local trails where i could easily maintain 20mph+ through the single track (allowing for acceleration out of the corners) as it was on a slight fall line. It’s all brain-farts at the moment so the tuning kit is still in my toolbox and it may stay in there.

Amazing bike, quick. On the flat average 21mph full power, after 3-4 miles average 18mph. A lot of hills in SoCal so this 1/3 hp motor does it’s job well with pedal assist on very steep grades. With electric only mode and heavy, steep, long hills this bike does its job pushing through a 16 mile commute with some energy to spare with a 190lb load of me and my gear. This bike could do much more with flat and pedal assist modes maybe twice as far. Recommend you use smaller tires 1.75 vs the standard 1.95 to achieve my results. Continental contact travels work great! 

The bike comes partly disassembled for shipping, so you'll have to attach the handlebars, pedals, front light, quick-release saddle and front wheel. In all, it'll take you around 30 minutes including removing all the cable ties and packaging. The tools to do this are included, but you might prefer you use your own screwdriver and spanners as the supplied tools are poor quality.


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Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.

I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good. 

Rented a pretty decent Scott. Did some nice mixed terrain but only for a day. Firstly it was great fun. Hard to get away from that. The pedalling felt good. It was like everything was a slight downhill. You can pootle or give it a few hard pedals and fly along at any time. On the flat, uphill, on bumpy grass, all felt like downs once you pedaled a lttle. Good connection between the pedalling and the movement. Smooth delivery. It just took the terrain and slope out of the equation. Could’ve easily got away with less power. It would be an expensive buy. This one was 3.5k but kitted out like a £500 halfords special. Once the price comes down they will be everywhere.
For every post we write we have done hours of research and have had as much hands on experience with the product as possible. Our aim is to get a complete understanding of the item(s) we’re testing, but if we have any doubts or queries we have no hesitation in going straight to the manufacturer for information that might not be readily available to you, the customer.
So it’s time to get yourself one of those fancy new electric bikes that are passing you by. You came to the right place. Whether you want a reliable electric bike to commute to work, an electric mountain bike for adventure, or a fat tire bike for trips to grandma’s house, our Best Electric Bikes For 2019 buyer’s guide will keep you in the right lane. 

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Why We Like It: This is the best electric folding bike for 2019. It has great features along with portability. The ANCHEER Folding Electric Bike is the bike that we tested. We love that the bikes battery can be removed. It performs great, has a comfortable speed, decent range and is light and durable. The only minor issues we had are that the headlight is made cheaply and for the speed/range we felt that it should charge just a bit faster.
Meeting at University whilst studying Electronic and Electrical Engineering, we realised that we were both active individuals with a shared interest in outdoor sports and anything with two wheels. Combining our engineering knowledge and our years of experience with skateboards, scooters, bikes and more, we feel that we’re in a great position to test and understand these products and provide you with an unbiased, accurate source of information. 
It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
For every post we write we have done hours of research and have had as much hands on experience with the product as possible. Our aim is to get a complete understanding of the item(s) we’re testing, but if we have any doubts or queries we have no hesitation in going straight to the manufacturer for information that might not be readily available to you, the customer.
Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).

my thoughts on Hucksauce's question (electric bike or electric motorcycle? How is it defined?). I own a Honda ruckus, its 50cc its max speed cant exceed 45mph and i don't need a motorcycle license. therefore no motorcycle. If the motor on a E-bike can carry you past 45mph i would consider it a motorcycle. made street legal a E-bike that Exceeds 45mph possible would need a motorcycle license.
I've now had this bike for 6 months and have over 2,400 miles on the odometer. That said, considering what I know about this bike now, I'd buy it again today, in a heartbeat. It's an excellent bike and suites my needs exactly. Before finding this bike on Amazon I tried several bikes in local shops to understand the fundamental features. I got this bike for exercise and for my short commute to work. I needed a bike that could accommodate my bad knees, ruined by athletics and years of running on hard pavement. I am unable to effectively ride a regular bike in the area where I live, which is very hilly (Seattle area). On a normal bike (my 15-year old mountain bike) I can't transfer enough energy to the pedals to get up the final street to my house, my knees don't allow it. This bike takes the edge off the hills but still allows me to minimize or turn off the assist when I don't really need it. I don't use this bike off-road as a mountain bike. I use it for riding on paved roads and urban biking/walking trails.

I've now had this Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike for 6 months and have over 2,400 miles on the odometer. That said, considering what I know about this bike now, I'd buy it again today, in a heartbeat. It's an excellent bike and suites my needs exactly. Before finding this bike on Amazon I tried several bikes in local shops to understand the fundamental features. I got this bike for exercise and for my short commute to work. I needed a bike that could accommodate my bad knees, ruined by athletics and years of running on hard pavement. I am unable to effectively ride a regular bike in the area where I live, which is very hilly (Seattle area). On a normal bike (my 15-year old mountain bike) I can't transfer enough energy to the pedals to get up the final street to my house, my knees don't allow it. This bike takes the edge off the hills but still allows me to minimize or turn off the assist when I don't really need it. I don't use this bike off-road as a mountain bike. I use it for riding on paved roads and urban biking/walking trails.


This is a good electric bike with all the features that you could ever desire from your model. It is affordable, high tech savvy and can accommodate a range of different body heights and shapes owing to its clever design and strong frame. Therefore, it really is very versatile. You don’t have to be a pro biker to purchase it, as it can be just as fun to ride around town or cycle out on your daily commute.
So whether you want to achieve physical fitness or just want to avoid daily traffic to work or school, the Ancheer Power Plus has got you covered. But of course, if you want to achieve maximum benefit out it as a workout tool, you will have to do more of the peddling than cruising. It also offers a convenient alternative when you want to hit the rough terrain or long distances where peddling all the way is not an option.
I haven't quite figured the brakes out yet. The back brake has a lot of rubbing on one brake pad (outboard). I've gone through YouTube and have done everything short of taking the brake pads out and adjusting the springs. Not sure what I'm going to do about it yet. Disk brakes work great though. I do have some annoying squealing but it is probably on me for not having it adjusted right. 

Yep, there’s no getting away from the fact that i’m peddling a 21kg bike when the assist is switched off but with the massive battery & range there is no real need to switch it off, I can barely turn the pedals on a normal bike when i hit a hill so if i’m on the road and wanting as much range as possible to explore a few of the surrounding trails in my area of Galloway i’m quite happy using the eco mode to get myself around, the tour mode gives a bit more assist and is enough to tackle the majority of single track climbs with effort from myself, the sport mode is enough for all but the steepest of singletrack use and the turbo mode is just batshit mental for all out super steep climbs and so much fun.
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