Weight isn’t anything like a critical as one would assume. Weight distribution however is a different matter and this is where geometry, specifically the ratio of the front centre measurement to the chain stay length really comes into play. Battery placement is important too, and smaller batteries give an edge in the handling stakes while robbing the bike of range.
With different degrees of assistance at your fingertips, riders of varying fitness levels are easily accommodated on the same ride too. Which, depending on who’s setting the pace, can bring a social aspect back to big days out, because you can all ride together and the assistance from the motor makes it that much easier to string a coherent sentence together even on the steepest climbs.
Bosch’s flagship mountain bike system uses a mini drive ring with internal gearing to send its power to the drivetrain. There’s some resistance in the system over 25km/h, but when you first press down on the pedals there’s an impressive surge of power, and it offers good support over a wide cadence range. Its size has an impact on the width of the cranks (the Q-factor) as well as the chainstay length of the frame, and it’s not the lightest system on the market at 4kg for the motor. On the other hand, Bosch is the most established player on the market, and its system has proven itself over many years. 

With most ebikes the choice of motor defines aspects of the frame geometry and to a lesser degree the suspension characteristics of the bike. Not with new Rock Mountain Altitude Powerplay. With its bespoke motor Rocky has been able to design an ebike that reflects the ride quality of a highly evolved 150mm trail bike. With instant power pickup, extended battery life and streamline proportions it’s not just the handling of the Rocky that will get you charged up for riding. It’s the best bike in this test by some margin, but we had an issue with the motor momentarily cutting and raising questions over it’s reliability. 

My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.
A few days after receiving the bike I received an email from Homdox asking if everything arrived ok and how the bike was working out. I let them know about the broken handle on the gear shift and sent them pictures. They replied on the first business day that followed stating they'd send a replacement. So... impressions right now are good. Hopefully the part arrives quickly and is in fact the right part.
It is a nice bike for the money, it has some nice features. However the instructions did not fit the bike model. The given web sites noted in the instructions did not work. Went online and had to visit several other sites to get the instructions for this bike. No one site fit the bike. Very fustrating. It would be nice if the throttle also worked with the other modes. Seat is very uncomfortable. I will change that. Bike was not well packaged. I was glad to see bike was not damaged in shipment.
It is not a off-road motorbike with an electric engine and a throttle. Electric mountain bikes have motors that only work when you’re pedalling. The motor tops-up your pedalling input. It’s called ‘pedal assist’. There are differing levels of assistance (called things like ‘eco’ and ‘turbo’) that you select via a handlebar-mounted control unit. The motor also cuts out once you reach 25km/ph (or faster). There are strict limits on the power of electric mountain bikes; 250w is the maximum nominal power. More powerful than that and the bike requires tax and insurance (like a car/motorbike) and is also not allowed on bridleways at all.
My wife has a Scott, essentially a Contessa with a Bosch crank motor. Very heavy thing, bloody hard work with no assistance, but even with assist on progress surely depends on your effort. We don’t do a lot of trail centres, but it’s been fine round Rothie, up to Einich, in Inshriach and up the Corbett behind Kingussie, as well as onroad. Lets us ride together, which would be harder without assist, and is heling her recover from skiing injuries.
Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position. 

Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position. 

Ancheer specialise in a range of electrical and non electrical products, from simple trampolines to some high tech electric mountain bikes. All their products follow a theme of being reasonably well made and being on the lower end of the price range. Today we’ll look at and review the Ancheer Folding Electric Mountain bike. We’ve gathered all the information you need to help you decide whether it’s the right e-bike for you.
Overall, you’re not going to get a foldable electric mountain bike that’s better than this at the price that Ancheer are selling it for. It’s well built and designed, it’s easy to use and put together and it makes mountain biking so much more fun whilst opening it up to more people. If you’re looking for a versatile e-bike that is just at home on the mountain as it is on the morning commute, all for waaay less than $1000 then this might just be the bike for you.
Rented a pretty decent Scott. Did some nice mixed terrain but only for a day. Firstly it was great fun. Hard to get away from that. The pedalling felt good. It was like everything was a slight downhill. You can pootle or give it a few hard pedals and fly along at any time. On the flat, uphill, on bumpy grass, all felt like downs once you pedaled a lttle. Good connection between the pedalling and the movement. Smooth delivery. It just took the terrain and slope out of the equation. Could’ve easily got away with less power. It would be an expensive buy. This one was 3.5k but kitted out like a £500 halfords special. Once the price comes down they will be everywhere.
Why We Like It: This E-Bike handles sand and snow like a champ, delivering a great range and speed. NAKTO E-bikes has a very simple slogan, “Having Fun Riding for Everyone!”. It never really resonated with me until I tried out the NAKTO Fat Tire Electric Bicycle. The company sells directly to consumers to keep prices low and create happy customers.
Having a motor bolted to the bottom of a mountain bike that provides pedal assistance is an amazing leveller. The constant torque it applies to the chain rounds out the squarest of pedalling actions, which in turn helps stabilizes the rear suspension and counter pedal induced bob, seamlessly shifting your focus from pedalling efficiency to battery life.
I continued to have issues with the rear brakes. The rear disc brake was bending when I braked and I could not figure out how to get it from rubbing on the pads. I eventually took the bike over to REI and paid for a tune-up. Fantastic work by them, the bike has a better top speed by a couple mph now and shifting/braking are much smoother. I was also having issues with the chain jumping off the front derailleur on high torque (high gear from standstill). Looks like I just needed the experts to give it the tune.
I continued to have issues with the rear brakes. The rear disc brake was bending when I braked and I could not figure out how to get it from rubbing on the pads. I eventually took the bike over to REI and paid for a tune-up. Fantastic work by them, the bike has a better top speed by a couple mph now and shifting/braking are much smoother. I was also having issues with the chain jumping off the front derailleur on high torque (high gear from standstill). Looks like I just needed the experts to give it the tune.
Yep, there’s no getting away from the fact that i’m peddling a 21kg bike when the assist is switched off but with the massive battery & range there is no real need to switch it off, I can barely turn the pedals on a normal bike when i hit a hill so if i’m on the road and wanting as much range as possible to explore a few of the surrounding trails in my area of Galloway i’m quite happy using the eco mode to get myself around, the tour mode gives a bit more assist and is enough to tackle the majority of single track climbs with effort from myself, the sport mode is enough for all but the steepest of singletrack use and the turbo mode is just batshit mental for all out super steep climbs and so much fun.
I haven't quite figured the brakes out yet. The back brake has a lot of rubbing on one brake pad (outboard). I've gone through YouTube and have done everything short of taking the brake pads out and adjusting the springs. Not sure what I'm going to do about it yet. Disk brakes work great though. I do have some annoying squealing but it is probably on me for not having it adjusted right.
“The Ancheer Power Plus is a really nice e-bike.  It rides well and has lots of goodies including LED lights and a nice electric horn.  I like that it is pedal assist – all you have to do is set it to how much pedal assist you want and it does the rest without having to turn the throttle.  The only thing I found and maybe I’m missing something is that when the bike is folded there doesn’t appear to be a clasp which makes it difficult to carry.”

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