The Ancheer Power Plus is the kind of bike you go for when you need a versatile high-quality e bike that comes with all the premium features but at a pocket-friendly price. Apart from being one of the most affordable electric bikes on the market, it’s considered the best e bike for hills and off– road situations. The following part of this Ancheer Power Plus Electric Mountain Bike Review outlines the features to help you understand what you getting into.
E-enduro bikes aren’t as different to regular bikes as one might imagine. All of the fundamentals are the same and by nailing the geometry and sizing Vitus has produced an amazing e-bike with the E-Sommet VR.Sure there are a couple of little things we’d probably change, like the STEPS Di2 mode shifter and rear tyre, but that’s about it. And given how much cheaper the Vitus is compared to the competition, you can easily afford to make these changes and even buy a spare battery. The E-Sommet VR is no golf buggy, but Vitus has it’s certainly hit a hole in one with this bike.

Ancheer specialise in a range of electrical and non electrical products, from simple trampolines to some high tech electric mountain bikes. All their products follow a theme of being reasonably well made and being on the lower end of the price range. Today we’ll look at and review the Ancheer Folding Electric Mountain bike. We’ve gathered all the information you need to help you decide whether it’s the right e-bike for you.
Tyres: Chayoyang 26in tyres Handlebars: Aluminum Alloy Lithium battery: 36V Charging time: 4-6 hours Motor: 250W high speed brushless gear motors Saddle tube: Aluminum Alloy seat tube Meter: 3-speed smart meter button Pedal: Aluminum Alloy Pedal Headlight: Bright LED headlamp and horn Front and rear wheels: Double layer Aluminum Alloy wheel (Rainbox DX-3000) Wheel Diameter: 26 inch Seat Height: 30.4-39 inch Handlebars length: 26.7 inch Vehicle weight: 20kg Battery weight: 2.2kg Mileage: 15-30 miles Load capacity: 150kg (over 120kg not recommended) Maximum speed of motor: 15.5mph

Electric bikes have been around for years, but are just now gaining wide acceptance with the public. Brand names include Schwinn, Ancheer, Nakto, Swagtron, X-treme Ebike, Merax and many more. This market is forecasted to hit $23,831 million by the year 2025.(R) In some areas, these vehicles are even taking money away from the Taxi industry.(R) Proof that the number of E-bikes on the road will only increase.


Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.
The Hover-1 is a lightweight, portable folding electric scooter meant to add a little bit of fun in your daily transportation. Read our Hover-1 Folding Electric Scooter Review and see if this fun little commuter is for you.A quick glance may trick you into thinking this is a toy for kids, but it’s not. The scooter is designed for use by adults for ...
Merida has done an amazing job with the EOne-Sixty 900E. It has a fun, playfully ride quality that few ebikes can match, and the price is simply unbeatable. It’s also the only sub 50lb bike in this test, and that’s without a single strand of carbon. It could be even better though. With a two degree slacker head angle and a little more power from the Shimano motor the EOne-Sixty would be able to keep up on the climbs, only to drop the competition on every descent. The biggest issue though, is actually getting hold of one.
I should have bought one a few years ago but i dithered as i placed my faith in the Spinal team to repair me, or at least offer a solution that i could work with to enable me to continue riding off-road but i finally had to face the fact that i will never be able to ride like i used to on my Soulcraft SS, no more lapping Kirroughtree or climbing Heatrbreak Hill over n’ over just because i could which if i’m honest with myself was partly why i refused to entertain the idea of an electric assist bike – i kinda took the huff n’ sat in the corner with a petted lip due to my lack of leg muscle strength – I refused to admit i needed any help.
Having a motor bolted to the bottom of a mountain bike that provides pedal assistance is an amazing leveller. The constant torque it applies to the chain rounds out the squarest of pedalling actions, which in turn helps stabilizes the rear suspension and counter pedal induced bob, seamlessly shifting your focus from pedalling efficiency to battery life.
The build quality, however, is generally fantastic. It feels sturdy and strong, the clip to hold the fold in place never feels like it’s coming loose and the wheels feel like they can conquer anything. Also the suspension system is quite impressive and isn’t even included on the non-folding Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike. This suspension system and the strong frame help give the Ancheer the ability to comfortably hold riders who weigh up to 150kg (330 lbs).
Ancheer specialise in a range of electrical and non electrical products, from simple trampolines to some high tech electric mountain bikes. All their products follow a theme of being reasonably well made and being on the lower end of the price range. Today we’ll look at and review the Ancheer Folding Electric Mountain bike. We’ve gathered all the information you need to help you decide whether it’s the right e-bike for you.
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Had my first crash on this bike. Right at the 500 mile mark mid-November. Sand had blown all over the bike path and I took it too fast. The bike did ok, but when I picked it back up the motor wouldn't work. I pedaled the rest of my commute and got a ride home. I suspected (and was correct) that the left brake lever was bent and the motor was not able to engage because it thought I was braking. I was nervous muscling it back, but it wasn't bent too bad. So that's what I did. And I also took the time to replace both wheels, inner-tubes, and give the bike a cleaning. The front wheel was still ok on tread but the back wheel tread was completely gone. Changing the front wheel was easy. The back wheel was more challenging because the motor cables and disc brakes. Ended up leaving the wheel on the bike and just moving it slightly to get the tube and wheel in place. Ended up just being more annoying than difficult. The chain cleaned up nice with some Simple Green. I haven't ridden on the commute nearly as much with me feeling a little more cautious and it getting dark so early (I don't need to wipe out in the bike lane into traffic...) All is well though. Have had zero issues with the motor since bending the brake back to its (or close to its) rightful position. 

Yep, there’s no getting away from the fact that i’m peddling a 21kg bike when the assist is switched off but with the massive battery & range there is no real need to switch it off, I can barely turn the pedals on a normal bike when i hit a hill so if i’m on the road and wanting as much range as possible to explore a few of the surrounding trails in my area of Galloway i’m quite happy using the eco mode to get myself around, the tour mode gives a bit more assist and is enough to tackle the majority of single track climbs with effort from myself, the sport mode is enough for all but the steepest of singletrack use and the turbo mode is just batshit mental for all out super steep climbs and so much fun.
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