They're not even announced yet so these are just kind of rumors the first off is this Cannondale e habit this was shed on emt-b forums it's running on the new Bosch motor I think that Bosch may have used this to show off their new motor as well this looks really really neat I loved it in this kind of colorway that's gotta be coming really really soon and finally it looks like Trek are about to release a new version of their power fly and in fact I think it's called something totally different the rumors are that it's gonna be called the trek rail hopefully it's based really similarly to the power fly which I've read recently which I really really enjoyed doing the Bosch emt-b challenge.
The Ancheer is powered by a 36V 8Ah battery system that is mounted on the front of the handlebars. This powers a 250 W brushless motor. How much power you want the bike to exert is dependant on which mode you set it to. It has 2 modes: assistive and e-bike. E-bike will power the entire thing for you so you don’t have to pedal at all, whereas assistive will give you a bit of power to help you out. This is all controlled by a small panel on the handlebars. The assistive mode has 3 settings so you can have as much control over the amount of work you do as you desire. 

Meeting at University whilst studying Electronic and Electrical Engineering, we realised that we were both active individuals with a shared interest in outdoor sports and anything with two wheels. Combining our engineering knowledge and our years of experience with skateboards, scooters, bikes and more, we feel that we’re in a great position to test and understand these products and provide you with an unbiased, accurate source of information. 
I've now had this bike for 6 months and have over 2,400 miles on the odometer. That said, considering what I know about this bike now, I'd buy it again today, in a heartbeat. It's an excellent bike and suites my needs exactly. Before finding this bike on Amazon I tried several bikes in local shops to understand the fundamental features. I got this bike for exercise and for my short commute to work. I needed a bike that could accommodate my bad knees, ruined by athletics and years of running on hard pavement. I am unable to effectively ride a regular bike in the area where I live, which is very hilly (Seattle area). On a normal bike (my 15-year old mountain bike) I can't transfer enough energy to the pedals to get up the final street to my house, my knees don't allow it. This bike takes the edge off the hills but still allows me to minimize or turn off the assist when I don't really need it. I don't use this bike off-road as a mountain bike. I use it for riding on paved roads and urban biking/walking trails.
Weight isn’t anything like a critical as one would assume. Weight distribution however is a different matter and this is where geometry, specifically the ratio of the front centre measurement to the chain stay length really comes into play. Battery placement is important too, and smaller batteries give an edge in the handling stakes while robbing the bike of range.
It is a nice bike for the money, it has some nice features. However the instructions did not fit the bike model. The given web sites noted in the instructions did not work. Went online and had to visit several other sites to get the instructions for this bike. No one site fit the bike. Very fustrating. It would be nice if the throttle also worked with the other modes. Seat is very uncomfortable. I will change that. Bike was not well packaged. I was glad to see bike was not damaged in shipment.
The gears don't seem to keep up on this bike. There are 21 gears, same as my other bike, but there is much more resistance at the highest gear on my other bike going 20mph than there is on this bike. The reason that is an issue is that during pedal assist, the bike goes pretty quick and I don't want to be pedaling air, I want some, just a little, resistance. I don't know the mechanics of it or how this would be the case, perhaps because this bike has smaller wheels than my other bike? The bike came pretty well adjusted on the derailleurs. I haven't touched the back but the front I've had to mess with a little. The chain fell off outboard once, so had to adjust. Chain guard did its job well. The chain got stuck pretty good, but once I loosed the chain guard everything was easily moved.
I think it looks pretty pretty sweet actually I'm really looking forward to testing this one they've also released more downhill orientated bike now this is the SX and it's got a 27 point five inch front and rear but 180 travel and a coil with 170 travel at the back that looks like a downhill bummer basically he doesn't know if you think about like the kinivo and more gravity orientated things like the perhaps the whitey decoy this looks like it fits really nicely in if you want a real long travel ebike so you just gonna be able to shuttle up to the top and blast it back down again so they're the new ones from comments ow they've just been announced next up we've got a couple of bikes from focus now these are using the all-new bosch generation 4 CX motor which is way more compact has a better distribution of power.

It was easy, good tools were shipped with the bike. The instructions are nearly useless, though. Like other reviews state, the front fork is backwards in the picture and shipped backwards. The disk brake should be on the port/left side. Flip the handlebar clasp around and leave the dirt guard facing forward. All the cables should flow naturally this way. Pedals were ok to put on, one of the pedals took a minute to get threaded but eventually got tightened.

Weight isn’t anything like a critical as one would assume. Weight distribution however is a different matter and this is where geometry, specifically the ratio of the front centre measurement to the chain stay length really comes into play. Battery placement is important too, and smaller batteries give an edge in the handling stakes while robbing the bike of range.
E-enduro bikes aren’t as different to regular bikes as one might imagine. All of the fundamentals are the same and by nailing the geometry and sizing Vitus has produced an amazing e-bike with the E-Sommet VR.Sure there are a couple of little things we’d probably change, like the STEPS Di2 mode shifter and rear tyre, but that’s about it. And given how much cheaper the Vitus is compared to the competition, you can easily afford to make these changes and even buy a spare battery. The E-Sommet VR is no golf buggy, but Vitus has it’s certainly hit a hole in one with this bike.
E-enduro bikes aren’t as different to regular bikes as one might imagine. All of the fundamentals are the same and by nailing the geometry and sizing Vitus has produced an amazing e-bike with the E-Sommet VR.Sure there are a couple of little things we’d probably change, like the STEPS Di2 mode shifter and rear tyre, but that’s about it. And given how much cheaper the Vitus is compared to the competition, you can easily afford to make these changes and even buy a spare battery. The E-Sommet VR is no golf buggy, but Vitus has it’s certainly hit a hole in one with this bike.
My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.
Not sure if there’s any in Southampton but there’s a couple of specialist electric bike shops in the Brighton area that sell them and they seem happy to let people do test rides. Probably the best way to decide if they’re the right thing for you and what you want to do. Would happily accompany you for a ride round Stanmer if you came over this way for a test.
My wife has a Scott, essentially a Contessa with a Bosch crank motor. Very heavy thing, bloody hard work with no assistance, but even with assist on progress surely depends on your effort. We don’t do a lot of trail centres, but it’s been fine round Rothie, up to Einich, in Inshriach and up the Corbett behind Kingussie, as well as onroad. Lets us ride together, which would be harder without assist, and is heling her recover from skiing injuries.
This Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike is absolutely great. I will gladly give it a 10 star if possible. However, one piece of advice for any intending buyer; make sure you dry the battery terminals after washing your bike. The bike will not power up once there is moisture at those interface.I have experienced this a few times over the last two months I've had my e-bike. It is annoying when you only find out, at the time you are rushing off to work.
I haven't quite figured the brakes out yet. The back brake has a lot of rubbing on one brake pad (outboard). I've gone through YouTube and have done everything short of taking the brake pads out and adjusting the springs. Not sure what I'm going to do about it yet. Disk brakes work great though. I do have some annoying squealing but it is probably on me for not having it adjusted right. 

Big Bird, you make some great points. One. Where is the line drawn between electric bike and motorcycle. Two. It would allow those who might not be able to enjoy the outdoors mobility. In my opinion I feel electric bikes lean more to the motorcycle side of things. Don't get me wrong, I ride and share certain trails with motos, however not all trails are open to them. Here is where I see the potential for conflict among other user groups with electric bikes. That being said your idea for stickers for the disabled seems to make sense. So now the question is, electric bike or electric motorcycle? How is it defined?



The suspension works, but there isn’t any true dampening. Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike - That means you’re just riding around on springs. On a real full suspension e-bike (i.e. a few thousand dollars) you get actual oil-dampened shocks. Those absorb bumps and dampen the shock. With springs, the bike bounces a few times after bumps, with the energy dissipating through the spring stretching and compressing.
I've now had this Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike for 6 months and have over 2,400 miles on the odometer. That said, considering what I know about this bike now, I'd buy it again today, in a heartbeat. It's an excellent bike and suites my needs exactly. Before finding this bike on Amazon I tried several bikes in local shops to understand the fundamental features. I got this bike for exercise and for my short commute to work. I needed a bike that could accommodate my bad knees, ruined by athletics and years of running on hard pavement. I am unable to effectively ride a regular bike in the area where I live, which is very hilly (Seattle area). On a normal bike (my 15-year old mountain bike) I can't transfer enough energy to the pedals to get up the final street to my house, my knees don't allow it. This bike takes the edge off the hills but still allows me to minimize or turn off the assist when I don't really need it. I don't use this bike off-road as a mountain bike. I use it for riding on paved roads and urban biking/walking trails.
Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).

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