If you really want to see the future take a look at the Fazua Evation, with a battery and motor this system weighs an incredible 4.7kg! The battery only has 250wh, but at 1.3kg you could easily carry a spare in a pack. The really interesting thing about this system though, is the motor and the battery can be removed from the frame, so you really do have two bikes in one.
Why We Like It: This E-Bike handles sand and snow like a champ, delivering a great range and speed. NAKTO E-bikes has a very simple slogan, “Having Fun Riding for Everyone!”. It never really resonated with me until I tried out the NAKTO Fat Tire Electric Bicycle. The company sells directly to consumers to keep prices low and create happy customers.

Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.

Why We Like It: This is a very capable mountain bike that just about anyone can ride and enjoy. It has great suspension, a smooth ride, and amazing tires that grip everything. The charge time and the battery’s odd position on the frame are our only gripes, but those things aside, you can’t argue with the power and quality of this fat electric bike. It makes a heck of a beach cruiser. You’ll love everything from the front hub to the back hub.


Meeting at University whilst studying Electronic and Electrical Engineering, we realised that we were both active individuals with a shared interest in outdoor sports and anything with two wheels. Combining our engineering knowledge and our years of experience with skateboards, scooters, bikes and more, we feel that we’re in a great position to test and understand these products and provide you with an unbiased, accurate source of information. 

For every post we write we have done hours of research and have had as much hands on experience with the product as possible. Our aim is to get a complete understanding of the item(s) we’re testing, but if we have any doubts or queries we have no hesitation in going straight to the manufacturer for information that might not be readily available to you, the customer.
This Foldable bike has super cool style, so you'll feel proud displaying it around town. Some assembly is required. The ANCHEER 26inch 36V Foldable Bike can Speed up to 25km/h,High speed brushless shock.This folding bike is easy to transport, saving space in the reserve compartment.The mountain bike is Shimano 7th gear transmission Disc Suspension Fork.
My wife has a Scott, essentially a Contessa with a Bosch crank motor. Very heavy thing, bloody hard work with no assistance, but even with assist on progress surely depends on your effort. We don’t do a lot of trail centres, but it’s been fine round Rothie, up to Einich, in Inshriach and up the Corbett behind Kingussie, as well as onroad. Lets us ride together, which would be harder without assist, and is heling her recover from skiing injuries. 

I have done a video check that out if you want more details on the new bosch system but these use the 625 watt hour Bosch into battery so you get around 25% extra on top of the 500 watt hour batteries in terms of range or battery life and personally to me that makes quite a big difference because if you're out for all-day adventures.

It is a nice bike for the money, it has some nice features. However the instructions did not fit the bike model. The given web sites noted in the instructions did not work. Went online and had to visit several other sites to get the instructions for this bike. No one site fit the bike. Very fustrating. It would be nice if the throttle also worked with the other modes. Seat is very uncomfortable. I will change that. Bike was not well packaged. I was glad to see bike was not damaged in shipment.
Yep, there’s no getting away from the fact that i’m peddling a 21kg bike when the assist is switched off but with the massive battery & range there is no real need to switch it off, I can barely turn the pedals on a normal bike when i hit a hill so if i’m on the road and wanting as much range as possible to explore a few of the surrounding trails in my area of Galloway i’m quite happy using the eco mode to get myself around, the tour mode gives a bit more assist and is enough to tackle the majority of single track climbs with effort from myself, the sport mode is enough for all but the steepest of singletrack use and the turbo mode is just batshit mental for all out super steep climbs and so much fun. 

Foldable – When you are not using the bike and want to store it at home, or want to carry it around, it can be folded up. This helps in saving a lot of space in your garage and also in the vehicle you are traveling in. now you don’t have to worry about bringing the bike back with you, just because you ran into a friend and want to hitch a ride in their car.
Bought Ancheer Power Plus mountain bike in Feb. Now in May the electrical portion of the bike went completely dead. Battery is fully charged but none of the e components work, display, horn, light and above all no rear wheel motor. what is the problem…..have tried Ancheer phone # contacts but never receive a call back after leaving message. Very disappointed!
The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.
Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).
The build quality, however, is generally fantastic. It feels sturdy and strong, the clip to hold the fold in place never feels like it’s coming loose and the wheels feel like they can conquer anything. Also the suspension system is quite impressive and isn’t even included on the non-folding Ancheer Electric Mountain Bike. This suspension system and the strong frame help give the Ancheer the ability to comfortably hold riders who weigh up to 150kg (330 lbs).
It was easy, good tools were shipped with the bike. The instructions are nearly useless, though. Like other reviews state, the front fork is backwards in the picture and shipped backwards. The disk brake should be on the port/left side. Flip the handlebar clasp around and leave the dirt guard facing forward. All the cables should flow naturally this way. Pedals were ok to put on, one of the pedals took a minute to get threaded but eventually got tightened.
Big Bird, you make some great points. One. Where is the line drawn between electric bike and motorcycle. Two. It would allow those who might not be able to enjoy the outdoors mobility. In my opinion I feel electric bikes lean more to the motorcycle side of things. Don't get me wrong, I ride and share certain trails with motos, however not all trails are open to them. Here is where I see the potential for conflict among other user groups with electric bikes. That being said your idea for stickers for the disabled seems to make sense. So now the question is, electric bike or electric motorcycle? How is it defined?
The suspension works, but there isn’t any true dampening. That means you’re just riding around on springs. On a real full suspension e-bike (i.e. a few thousand dollars) you get actual oil-dampened shocks. Those absorb bumps and dampen the shock. With springs, the bike bounces a few times after bumps, with the energy dissipating through the spring stretching and compressing.
M8 has had a cube with the Bosch motor, reduced from Europe but a solid spec & loves it, been cycling more because of it. It definitely brings a smile to your face, laughing at climbs that you’d normally slog up. Horrible muddy trails become a motocross frenzy, balance being more the issue than grip or momentum. He’s happy to lend it on rides, so three of us all different sizes, jump on it & it doesn’t mater that it not set up for you, the motor makes up for any details
My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.
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I haven't quite figured the brakes out yet. The back brake has a lot of rubbing on one brake pad (outboard). I've gone through YouTube and have done everything short of taking the brake pads out and adjusting the springs. Not sure what I'm going to do about it yet. Disk brakes work great though. I do have some annoying squealing but it is probably on me for not having it adjusted right.
Big Bird, you make some great points. One. Where is the line drawn between electric bike and motorcycle. Two. It would allow those who might not be able to enjoy the outdoors mobility. In my opinion I feel electric bikes lean more to the motorcycle side of things. Don't get me wrong, I ride and share certain trails with motos, however not all trails are open to them. Here is where I see the potential for conflict among other user groups with electric bikes. That being said your idea for stickers for the disabled seems to make sense. So now the question is, electric bike or electric motorcycle? How is it defined?
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my thoughts on Hucksauce's question (electric bike or electric motorcycle? How is it defined?). I own a Honda ruckus, its 50cc its max speed cant exceed 45mph and i don't need a motorcycle license. therefore no motorcycle. If the motor on a E-bike can carry you past 45mph i would consider it a motorcycle. made street legal a E-bike that Exceeds 45mph possible would need a motorcycle license. 

The bike comes partly disassembled for shipping, so you'll have to attach the handlebars, pedals, front light, quick-release saddle and front wheel. In all, it'll take you around 30 minutes including removing all the cable ties and packaging. The tools to do this are included, but you might prefer you use your own screwdriver and spanners as the supplied tools are poor quality.
What i’d really like is the ability to custom tune the standard speed settings with regard to the torque curve/output and perhaps have a top speed of 18mph or thereabouts, back when i could ride a normal bike under my own steam there were some sections of my local trails where i could easily maintain 20mph+ through the single track (allowing for acceleration out of the corners) as it was on a slight fall line. It’s all brain-farts at the moment so the tuning kit is still in my toolbox and it may stay in there.
I haven't given a full benchmark on battery life as I haven't gone without pedaling just using the motor. I live in a hilly place and I need to pedal to make it up some hills. But initial impressions are good. My hilly trip to the beach with kids in tow was about 13 miles round trip and I made it down to 3 of 5 bars on the battery. The battery does go down when the motor is under stress but levels itself when back on level ground. Battery is looking good.
The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.
I haven't quite figured the brakes out yet. The back brake has a lot of rubbing on one brake pad (outboard). I've gone through YouTube and have done everything short of taking the brake pads out and adjusting the springs. Not sure what I'm going to do about it yet. Disk brakes work great though. I do have some annoying squealing but it is probably on me for not having it adjusted right.
This bike is absolutely great. I will gladly give it a 10 star if possible. However, one piece of advice for any intending buyer; make sure you dry the battery terminals after washing your bike. The bike will not power up once there is moisture at those interface.I have experienced this a few times over the last two months I've had my e-bike. It is annoying when you only find out, at the time you are rushing off to work. 

Electric bikes have been around for years, but are just now gaining wide acceptance with the public. Brand names include Schwinn, Ancheer, Nakto, Swagtron, X-treme Ebike, Merax and many more. This market is forecasted to hit $23,831 million by the year 2025.(R) In some areas, these vehicles are even taking money away from the Taxi industry.(R) Proof that the number of E-bikes on the road will only increase.

It was easy, good tools were shipped with the bike. The instructions are nearly useless, though. Like other reviews state, the front fork is backwards in the picture and shipped backwards. The disk brake should be on the port/left side. Flip the handlebar clasp around and leave the dirt guard facing forward. All the cables should flow naturally this way. Pedals were ok to put on, one of the pedals took a minute to get threaded but eventually got tightened.
Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.

The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.


In our view, e-bikes are approaching a crossroads in concept and design. Heading off in one direction are longer travel, enduro-style e-bikes, which are largely designed for cruising up and then blasting back down. Plotting a slightly different course is the idea of a lightweight model that rides much more like a normal mountain bike, but requires more work from the rider. Of the two approaches, both have their benefits, but it’s the latter that gets us the most excited. Once the overall weight falls into the 16-17kg range (the lightest bikes are currently19-20kg) it’s going to be really hard to tell the difference between an e-bike and a regular trail bike on the descents and the flat, but you get the benefit of a gentle push up the climbs.
What i’d really like is the ability to custom tune the standard speed settings with regard to the torque curve/output and perhaps have a top speed of 18mph or thereabouts, back when i could ride a normal bike under my own steam there were some sections of my local trails where i could easily maintain 20mph+ through the single track (allowing for acceleration out of the corners) as it was on a slight fall line. It’s all brain-farts at the moment so the tuning kit is still in my toolbox and it may stay in there.

Why We Like It: This is the best electric folding bike for 2019. It has great features along with portability. The ANCHEER Folding Electric Bike is the bike that we tested. We love that the bikes battery can be removed. It performs great, has a comfortable speed, decent range and is light and durable. The only minor issues we had are that the headlight is made cheaply and for the speed/range we felt that it should charge just a bit faster.
Not sure if there’s any in Southampton but there’s a couple of specialist electric bike shops in the Brighton area that sell them and they seem happy to let people do test rides. Probably the best way to decide if they’re the right thing for you and what you want to do. Would happily accompany you for a ride round Stanmer if you came over this way for a test.
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