I've had the eBike for about a week now and figure it is time to post my impressions. Overall, I am satisfied with the bike, especially based on the price. It has not been without hiccups (see below) but after quite a bit of research online I am convinced for the price, nothing out there will compare. Not five stars based on a few pending issues which will hopefully be resolved. It is not perfect. I have no idea if the more expensive bikes are "perfect", though. I've spent some good time tinkering on this bike making adjustments so far, but that's normal for any new bike.
Everything arrived in perfect condition with minimal assembly. It took a moment to figure out where the headlight goes, and the rear reflector has a bike-seat (not a frame) mount, but I didn't even need the instructions. (Good thing, because the "instructions" suck. Find a video instead.) That said, if you buy this, pay attention: as others have noted, the front disc brake will be on your LEFT side when you're done (the fork is reversed for packaging purposes).
This bike is absolutely great. I will gladly give it a 10 star if possible. However, one piece of advice for any intending buyer; make sure you dry the battery terminals after washing your bike. The bike will not power up once there is moisture at those interface.I have experienced this a few times over the last two months I've had my e-bike. It is annoying when you only find out, at the time you are rushing off to work.
The RideControl Evo display features a button control on the grip and a readout on the stem, giving you control over ride time, distance and cadence. Best of all, it gives you as very accurate percentage readout of how much battery is remaining, so no excuses for running out of juice! The five rides mode are Eco, Basic, Active, Sport and Power and there’s also a walk assist button.

When it comes to the distance it can cover at a single charge, it really depends. For instance, if you live 13 miles from work and ride on a smooth, flat pavement, the bike has enough power to get you home. The battery level does decrease when the motor is under increased stress—like when you’re riding up a hilly terrain—but it quickly levels itself when you go back riding on a flat road surface.


The Ancheer is powered by a 36V 8Ah battery system that is mounted on the front of the handlebars. This powers a 250 W brushless motor. How much power you want the bike to exert is dependant on which mode you set it to. It has 2 modes: assistive and e-bike. E-bike will power the entire thing for you so you don’t have to pedal at all, whereas assistive will give you a bit of power to help you out. This is all controlled by a small panel on the handlebars. The assistive mode has 3 settings so you can have as much control over the amount of work you do as you desire.


My first instinct is that it's a horrible idea. We're cyclists because we are fit enough. We've earned our way to the top. Why should some couch surfer be able to meet me there to enjoy the downhill? (I'd beat him down of course because my bike is lighter and more nimble.) And also, where do you draw the line between an electric bike and an electric motorcycle? I'd hate to meet a Zero FX or MX coming up the downhill trail I'm riding.
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Before this test we thought more travel on an e-bike would obviously be better. After all, with the motor flattening out the climbs, why not have the extra suspension firepower to smooth out the descents? Sounds reasonable, doesn’t it? But in the case of the Specialized Turbo Kenevo Expert, the extra travel and weight make the bike less effective and less engaging on all but full-on downhill tracks. And if that’s your bread and butter, the Kenevo could well be the perfect topping. Here in the UK though, the Vitus proved more versatile, just as capable and way better value.
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