Tackle your daily commute with ease or go for a weekend cruise in style with the Gazelle CityZen T10 e-bike. And don’t worry about those thigh-burning hills; the Bosch motor offers four assist levels—Eco, Tour, Range Sport, Turbo—making hills a breeze and the Lithium-Ion battery provides a range of up to 85 miles in Eco mode. The bike is one of the first to use Bosch's new integrated battery, which is concealed in the downtube. The matte black paint and classic, step-through design give a classic look while fenders, pannier racks, and integrated lights add practical functionality. The bike is easy to maneuver in city streets, but still has assist up to 28mph so you can cover a lot of miles and power up steep hills. There's a suspension fork too. It's not at the level of something you'd find on a mountain bike (or even some better e-bikes) but it takes the edge of some potholes and curbs.
I picked this bike because it’s definitely one of the lowest cost 28mph bikes out there that is still high quality. Magura MT4 hydraulic disc brakes keep you good and safe. The geometry provides a comfortable ride. Personally, I don’t always think a suspension fork is totally necessary since they are less efficient. If you’ve got a pretty smooth road to ride this is a great option.

The Ancheer comes with outstanding Shimano Tourney gears in 6 x speeds. This gear system is one of the best in the business. Similarly the front-rear disc brakes are perfectly effective and will bring you to a safe stop even from speed. Speaking of speed, the maximum is 16mph and the bike will travel anywhere between 17-23 miles on a single charge. The battery charges up in 4-6 hours, which is the same for virtually all e-bikes.

Look at Bulls giving you options! Very similar bike, but with the Bosch Performance Speed motor. Why did I include if it’s so similar? Because I think Bulls has build super interesting commuters. They set you up with a adjustable stem so you can literally be as upright as you want, if you’re a posture freak. Underrated part of this bike: water bottle boss placement. Call me crazy, but it’s little touches like these that tip the scales on commuting bikes for me. It isn’t always easy to find places to put cages on e-bikes.
“At $500 apiece,” he says, “the company would be selling e-bikes at a loss, once they factored in product liability insurance, quality control, regulatory compliance, safety testing, and post-sales service and support. Chinese e-bikes could certainly ‘leak’ into the U.S. market near that cost, be sold as a loss leader, or be marketed directly on eBay, but a fully costed business model could potentially lose up to $250 per bike.”
Automated Transit Networks (ATN), and the small-vehicle subset of Personal Rapid Transit (PRT), are emerging technologies that can help solve the related problems of congestion, dependence on foreign oil, and planetary climate disruption. ATN/PRT offers clean, quiet, responsive public transit with automated non-stop service available 24 hours a day. In addition to these service benefits, PRT costs far less to build and operate than other transit options ¯ and is safer than walking and cycling on nearby busy streets.

Fat E-Trike from Sun and E-BikeKit™ at Interbike 2014 Fat bikes and electric bikes were all the rage this year at interbike in Las Vegas. It seemed almost every bike vendor at the show has at least one fat bike model in their booth this year. On top of the fats were the electric bikes. And I think it goes without saying that nobody wants to actually pedal a fat...
Is it worth $1700? I’ll let you be the judge. I don’t have a lot of experience with commuter ebikes so I don’t know how it compares. I do know that most of the ebike conversions I’ve seen look like science experiments. The Buffalo could pass for a normal bike, and look a little more accessible to a first time ebike user. So, although I’m not planning on riding this, I am planning on using it. So I’ll keep it around for a while and let you guys know what I think long term.
Controllers for brushless motors: E-bikes require high initial torque and therefore models that use brushless motors typically have Hall sensor commutation for speed and angle measurement. An electronic controller provides assistance as a function of the sensor inputs, the vehicle speed and the required force. The controllers generally allow input by means of potentiometer or Hall Effect twist grip (or thumb-operated lever throttle), closed-loop speed control for precise speed regulation, protection logic for over-voltage, over-current and thermal protection. Bikes with a pedal assist function typically have a disc on the crank shaft featuring a ring of magnets coupled with a Hall sensor giving rise to a series of pulses, the frequency of which is proportional to pedaling speed. The controller uses pulse width modulation to regulate the power to the motor. Sometimes support is provided for regenerative braking but infrequent braking and the low mass of bicycles limits recovered energy. An implementation is described in an application note for a 200 W, 24 V Brushless DC (BLDC) motor.[43]
The first regularly produced device resembling the modern bicycle was unveiled in 1818. It was called the Dandy Horse. The two-wheeled ride-on Dandy Horse was the brainchild of German inventor Baron Karl Drais, and it featured a handle bar, a padded seat, and two inline wheels of nearly equal size. What it did not feature were pedals; this was a "running machine," thus its name in German, Laufmachine. The Dandy Horse saw only a flicker of popularity, and was largely an historical footnote within a handful of years, though its design is nearly mimicked in the child's balance bike of today.

“The new tariffs that have hit our industry (and so many others) will be difficult to navigate. Not because they will hurt our business but because they hurt the American consumer. If the US were more manufacturing friendly I think most bike companies would be happy to manufacture here. However it is very expensive to manufacture in the US and overseas manufacturing is the only real way to offer the American consumer potentially life changing products.”
“Yamaha’s power assist motors provide the purest, most natural assist feel thanks in part to Yamaha’s Triple Sensor System that has been exclusively optimized for Yamaha’s U.S. power assist bikes. Through the Triple Sensor System, thousands of times per second, frictionless sensors measure the rider’s pedal-torque, bicycle speed, and crank arm cadence with tremendous precision.”
Designed for urban or suburban commutes, the A2B Octave (right picture) offers lightweight aluminum construction with full suspension. Add in its comfortable,oversized seat and you have a powerful ride that's easy to handle. When you don't feel like pedaling, the A2B offers unassisted power on demand for up to 20 miles at a cruising speed of 20mph. Plus, the A2B can be easily upgraded to double its range to 40 miles with the addition of a secondary battery pack and increase its carrying capacity with the addition of baskets and rear carrier bags.
Certainly not for the entry-level e-bike buyer, those who need to strap cargo to their back now have a new option with the Riese & Muller Load option, with full cargo space on the front of the bike. While over $6,000, the full-suspension bike has adjustability to allow for differing loads. Safety features include LED headlights and premium components abound.
This 48-volt mid-motor electric mountain bike is a great value. The X-Treme Summit is packed with top-of-the-line components from Shimano, Suntour, Tektro, Samsung, Kenda, Velo, and more. With a top speed of 28 mph and tremendous torque from the mid-frame mounted motor, it conquers rough terrain and inclines like a champ. Pull power from the motor by pedal assist and throttle.

Electric Bikes Are Now Legal on Pennsylvania Roadways! Breaking News... According to the Bicycle Access Council of PA in their November 2014 News and Digest, Electric-Assist bicycles are now legal on Pennsylvania roadways as part of Act 154. "Electric-Assist bicycles are now legal on Pennsylvania roadways as part of Act 154. In a convoluted way since first introduced in 2010, a last minute amendment was introduced by Representative Kevin Schreiber (D-95) with...
Featuring Bosch’s newest CX Drive motor, the Trekking has enormous torque (that equals acceleration) compared with the rest of the bikes on test. From a standing start the Haibike reaches the 15.5mph European speed limit in seconds. Pair this with mid-sized 27.5in wheels and laid-back mountain-bike geometry, and you have a grin-inducing almost motorbike-like riding experience. This is accentuated off-road, where a rider’s lower average speed is under the motor cut-off point for more of the time, so suddenly the hefty Trekking makes complete sense.

Standard front suspension is the 7” conventional single crown forks. With 2 dials to adjust compression and rebound adjustment and air adjustment for preload, these forks are light weight and versatile enough for most situations. For heavier or more adventurous riders, the forks can be upgraded. The rear suspension is adjustable for casual every day riding or more aggressive off road environments.
The Brose motor is definitely the most quiet ebike motor that I’ve used. The 28mph model is no different. I also find it to be pretty solid in terms of power. Generally speaking, Bosch motors are considered the most powerful, but with the Brose I actually think you get a lot of power with a more “real” feeling cycling experience. They also give you a 675 watt hour battery pack, which is still unrivaled in terms of a single battery system.
Features:Non-toxic,non-odor that is safe using.Widely using for electric bikes, bicycles,mountain bikes and more.High efficient electric core.Large capacity design.Professional replacement battery.Metal safety protective safety lock,easy disassembly and installation of battery.Repetitive discharge test,anti-collision and wrestling.Descriptions:It so lightweight which is so portable to be taken.Novel appearance and stable output.The input is more stable and the service life is longer.Specifications:Size:380*90*87mmPackage Size:410*190*140mmColor:silver & blackVoltage:36V Battery Capacity:10AH Max constant discharger current:15AMax current:45ACharger:2ABattery Type:Lithium batteryPackage included:1x Replacement Battery1x Battery holder1x Power Su.
Is it worth $1700? I’ll let you be the judge. I don’t have a lot of experience with commuter ebikes so I don’t know how it compares. I do know that most of the ebike conversions I’ve seen look like science experiments. The Buffalo could pass for a normal bike, and look a little more accessible to a first time ebike user. So, although I’m not planning on riding this, I am planning on using it. So I’ll keep it around for a while and let you guys know what I think long term.
Written by Gaston Daigle. Gaston is an admin and key contributor at the popular Endless Sphere Technology Forum Batteries and battery packs, the lifeblood of your electric bicycle Plug and play?... not always that easy and certainly not very simple for most of us.. or is it? A good Lithium battery pack can cost as much, and often even more than the rest of your electric bike kit. Picking the right...

The riding position is racy, and we suffered a numb left hand after 45 minutes of riding due to a combination of the Bullhorn bars and the narrow position adopted to cover the ‘sissy’ brakes in traffic (picking a flat bar model would be more practical for city commuting). The biggest drawback to the Soho is that on a single-speed the 15.5mph cut-off (for all e-bike motors in Europe) left us feeling like we’d been "deserted". Over the cut-off speed we found ourselves dragging that heavy back wheel with no alternate gears to reach for.


The Cyrusher doesn’t have the reliable Bosch motor that higher-end bikes sport and the Samsung battery is only good for around 500 recharges, which is less than you’d expect for a lithium battery. But with the low price point, there are bound to be some compromises. A great option if you want a decent, all-around model for easy trails or commuting.


Proud to assemble the first Stromer ST5 in the US for a very special customer! @vancityreynolds #Repost @stromerbike with @get_repost ・・・ Ryan Reynolds is since 5 years a happy user of Stromer. Today we delivered him the new ST5 personally. #stromer #ryanreynolds #commute #happy #st5 #electricbikes #ebike #car #futuremobility #cycling #thoemus #amazing 22.07.2018 - 22:06


Standard front suspension is the 7” conventional single crown forks. With 2 dials to adjust compression and rebound adjustment and air adjustment for preload, these forks are light weight and versatile enough for most situations. For heavier or more adventurous riders, the forks can be upgraded. The rear suspension is adjustable for casual every day riding or more aggressive off road environments.
This bike is named the GSD because with it you can Get Stuff Done. Twenty-inch wheels keep the center of gravity low so heavy payloads—it's rated up to 400lbs—are easy to balance and a short (for a cargo bike) 70-inch wheelbase, similar to a standard single bike, make the GSD easy to maneuver. Designed with the urban commuter in mind, the bike can easily break down to 60 percent of its original size to fit into the back of a car and the rear rack doubles as a stand that allows it to stand upright to minimize space inside tight apartments. Put two child seats on the back and take the family along, or drop the seat and let you kid take the bike out himself—anyone from 4'10" to 6'5" can ride this bike. Last but not least, the GSD gives you the option of adding a second battery to extend your range up to about 150 miles on a single charge.
×