The Gazelle was made for city commutes - the riding position is relaxed yet so upright, you can look around, over car roofs and feel confident even in heavy traffic. The Orange is no fly-weight, though. With its rudimentary suspension fork, Post Moderne suspension seat-post, rack-mounted battery and "built for comfort" wheels, it’s 24.4kg weight (plus battery) excludes it from being regularly carried up-stairs or into flats for commuters who don’t have street-level entry or a bike store.

We found the Groove motor a little laggy in engagement, with often almost a full rotation of the cranks before the assist engaged - compared with the Gazelle and Vanmoof, the pick-up was frustrating. Putting our issues with the assist to one side, we couldn’t fault the aesthetic: we loves the semi-mixte frame style, a practical non-gender specific design.
Certainly not for the entry-level e-bike buyer, those who need to strap cargo to their back now have a new option with the Riese & Muller Load option, with full cargo space on the front of the bike. While over $6,000, the full-suspension bike has adjustability to allow for differing loads. Safety features include LED headlights and premium components abound.
Having never ridden one before, I took a few electric bikes out to review in Central London and was an instant convert. For a commuter, they're ideal. While you still feel you've done exercise, the assistance means you won't arrive at work in a hot and sweaty state. The power boost whenever you start from a standing position is ideal for a speedy getaway at a traffic light with buses and lorries right behind you. And you'll get a nice ego boost every time you effortlessly ride past a struggling regular cyclist.
Pedal Assist Electric Bikes, also known as "E-bikes," are bicycles that have an electric motor to assist riders. The motor is powered by a battery and only assists the cyclist when he/she is pedaling. Electric bikes come in many different styles including commuter, recreational, step-thru with low-entry frames, cargo and mountain. They all have one thing in common: e-bikes are very simple to ride – if you can ride a bike you can ride an electric bike!

This is list of the best performing, best value electric bikes for 2017 / 2018. For each category I list two models, the first recommendation is based on performance and the second is based on affordability. As you explore the list and get to know EBR, check out the ebike community forum for more personalized feedback. Share your height, weight, budget and intended use (along with bikes you like) to get advice from actual owners and moderators.


Our job is to make sure you enjoy your EVELO for many years to come. That’s why they are backed by a 4-year/20,000-mile warranty – double the industry average. If a problem comes up, you are just one call away from our U.S.-based customer service. Combined with our network of partner bike shops around the country for on-the-ground support, you are covered for anything a bike path can throw at you.

The first functioning electric motor was displayed in the early 19th century, though the device constructed by British scientist Michael Faraday did little more than swirl a wire around a magnet when an electric charge was introduced. Still, the concept proved that electricity could do work. Functional electric motors would follow in many forms after that achievement in 1821. Soon scientists and tinkerers around the world, including visionaries such as Nikola Tesla, were experimenting with all manner of electric motors -- some worked with DC power, others with AC. By the end of the century, myriad electric motors had been produced, capable of exerting enough force with enough reliable control that they were practical for use in myriad applications.

Some power-on-demand only e-bikes can hardly be confused with, let alone categorised as, bicycles. For example, the Noped is a term used by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario for e-bikes which do not have pedals or in which the pedals have been removed from their motorised bicycle. These are better categorised as electric mopeds or electric motorcycles.

The time or distance an electric bike battery will run between chargings is impossible to judge with much accuracy. There are too many variables: terrain, speed, rider weight, bike load (shopping, kids, luggage), and more. However, we can make a few generalizations about an e-bike’s recharge time and overall working life. These generalizations should be used for comparison purposes only.


The electric bike revolution has officially crossed into the arena of off-road motorbikes. For those who prefer riding in nature, Cake introduced a product which not only respects the environment but other riders, as well. Cake’s Kalk is a silent off-road motorbike that releases no emissions into the atmosphere. Additionally, its electric motor means no gear changing or clutching — a silent motorbike that won’t detract from the experience of others. Perhaps the best part is Cake avoided any sacrifice in performance. The Kalk reaches speeds of fifty miles per hour and features three distinct driving modes: Discover, Explore, and Excite.

You turn it on by pressing the green button on the battery once for low power and twice for high, although to be honest, there is not a lot of difference between them. After that, you just pedal. There are no gears, no chain to muck up your trousers (a motorbike-style carbon fibre belt is used instead) and not that much difference in feeling compared to riding a normal bike.
Motor: We have a blog post showing some motor differences: https://www.ebikekit.com/blogs/news/its-whats-inside-your-motor-that-counts Cabling is probably the #1 issue when something goes wrong. Good connectors, good cables, and good assembly (bike shop!) are crucial Strain reliefs on all cable joints! Where you have a junction box or a connector, the stress is concentrated over a small area near this stiff spot on the cable. This can cause small breaks on the internal...
On the road, it takes only a few turns of the pedals to activate the Vado’s motor and get it up to speed. In Turbo mode — the bike’s highest level of pedal-assist — the Vado reaches speeds of up to 28 miles per hour, after which the electric drive system automatically shuts off to conserve power (and abide by local law). A built-in LED readout on the handlebars allows riders to monitor battery life, check current speed, and track calories burned while also being able to glance at distance traveled. The Turbo Vado Mission Control app (iOS/Android) also connects to the bike via Bluetooth and allows riders to further tune their ride and adjust the bike’s settings.

The riding position is racy, and we suffered a numb left hand after 45 minutes of riding due to a combination of the Bullhorn bars and the narrow position adopted to cover the ‘sissy’ brakes in traffic (picking a flat bar model would be more practical for city commuting). The biggest drawback to the Soho is that on a single-speed the 15.5mph cut-off (for all e-bike motors in Europe) left us feeling like we’d been "deserted". Over the cut-off speed we found ourselves dragging that heavy back wheel with no alternate gears to reach for.
The environmental effects involved in recharging the batteries can of course be reduced. The small size of the battery pack on an e-bike, relative to the larger pack used in an electric car, makes them very good candidates for charging via solar power or other renewable energy resources. Sanyo capitalized on this benefit when it set up "solar parking lots", in which e-bike riders can charge their vehicles while parked under photovoltaic panels.[66]
A representative for Ancheer, a California-based e-bike company that sells some of the most affordable e-bikes in the US, expressed dismay over the tariffs in an interview with Electrek. Ancheer will regrettably be raising prices on their electric bicycles, but intends to try to absorb some of the cost to avoid passing on the entire 25% tariff to their customers.
But this bike isn’t just about the accessories. The powerful 48V 13Ah battery will allow you to pedal for longer, with some riders getting over 100 miles from one charge. The bike can be ridden as pedal-assist or throttle only and it’s equipped with full suspension and puncture-free Kenda tires. It folds up neatly to fit into the boot of a car or for commuting, though at 57 pounds, it’s heavy to cart around. A great value-for-money commuting bike with lots of features.
A Kalkhoff Pedelec is a lot more than simply bolting a motor onto a great bike. Their electric-assist bicycles utilize a brushless DC motor system that is lightweight, precisely-controlled, efficient, low-maintenance, and reliable. The Panasonic drive system is center drive, meaning that it's designed to be in the middle of the bike for a low center of gravity, stability and an easy integration with the drivetrain. The drive unit is more than just a motor; it also has a torque sensor and controller unit as well - all in the weatherproof casing, surrounding the motor. The torque sensor and the controller senses how hard you're pedaling and adjusts how much assistance the motor gives you through the drive sprocket.
A representative for Ancheer, a California-based e-bike company that sells some of the most affordable e-bikes in the US, expressed dismay over the tariffs in an interview with Electrek. Ancheer will regrettably be raising prices on their electric bicycles, but intends to try to absorb some of the cost to avoid passing on the entire 25% tariff to their customers.
One reason for doing so is the way it is powered, which works in a manner that would be familiar to someone accustomed to a manual transmission car. Like a car, you start in a low gear and work your way up as you gain speed. Since the motor runs through your transmission as opposed to applying power directly to the axle, the gear you’re in really matters. The importance of gearing connects you much more to the road and the terrain, which means you are a more active rider than when using throttle-controlled electric bikes.
We ran the C330 almost entirely in its speediest Turbo setting, switching back to Eco or Tour in heavy traffic for a more predictable assistance weaving between cars. Crucially, the display also displays how much assistance you’re getting as well as your speed, trip distance, etc. We used this to ease-back effort and stay in a light power sweet-spot, arriving at WIRED’s HQ without breaking a sweat.
The Dew-E packs functionality and fun into a rather traditional and conservative package. Front and rear fenders, integrated Busch & Müller front and rear lights, and a built-in Abus wheel lock make this a very practical commuter bike. An 11-34t 9-speed cassette and 1.75-inch tires provide versatility: You’ll stay smooth over rough city streets and zip down gravel bike paths with confidence. Front and rear rack mounts also give you the chance to outfit this bike for carrying more cargo or supplies for a longer day on the bike. Whichever way you think you’ll be riding an e-bike, this bike deserves a second look.
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